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Retrograde Degenerative Signaling Mediated by the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Requires p150 Deacetylation by Axonal HDAC1.
Pathak A, Stanley EM, Hickman FE, Wallace N, Brewer B, Li D, Gluska S, Perlson E, Fuhrmann S, Akassoglou K, Bronfman F, Casaccia P, Burnette DT, Carter BD
(2018) Dev Cell 46: 376-387.e7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axonal Transport, Axons, Dynactin Complex, Histone Deacetylase 1, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Neurons, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
During development, neurons undergo apoptosis if they do not receive adequate trophic support from tissues they innervate or when detrimental factors activate the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) at their axon ends. Trophic factor deprivation (TFD) or activation of p75NTR in distal axons results in a retrograde degenerative signal. However, the nature of this signal and the regulation of its transport are poorly understood. Here, we identify p75NTR intracellular domain (ICD) and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) as part of a retrograde pro-apoptotic signal generated in response to TFD or ligand binding to p75NTR in sympathetic neurons. We report an unconventional function of HDAC1 in retrograde transport of a degenerative signal and its constitutive presence in sympathetic axons. HDAC1 deacetylates dynactin subunit p150, which enhances its interaction with dynein. These findings define p75NTR ICD as a retrograde degenerative signal and reveal p150 deacetylation as a unique mechanism regulating axonal transport.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Optic Nerve Regeneration After Crush Remodels the Injury Site: Molecular Insights From Imaging Mass Spectrometry.
Stark DT, Anderson DMG, Kwong JMK, Patterson NH, Schey KL, Caprioli RM, Caprioli J
(2018) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 59: 212-222
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Cell Count, Cell Survival, Disease Models, Animal, Gliosis, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Microscopy, Confocal, Nerve Crush, Nerve Regeneration, Neuronal Plasticity, Optic Nerve, Optic Nerve Injuries, Rats, Rats, Inbred F344, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Purpose - Mammalian central nervous system axons fail to regenerate after injury. Contributing factors include limited intrinsic growth capacity and an inhibitory glial environment. Inflammation-induced optic nerve regeneration (IIR) is thought to boost retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic growth capacity through progrowth gene expression, but effects on the inhibitory glial environment of the optic nerve are unexplored. To investigate progrowth molecular changes associated with reactive gliosis during IIR, we developed an imaging mass spectrometry (IMS)-based approach that identifies discriminant molecular signals in and around optic nerve crush (ONC) sites.
Methods - ONC was performed in rats, and IIR was established by intravitreal injection of a yeast cell wall preparation. Optic nerves were collected at various postcrush intervals, and longitudinal sections were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS and data mining. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to compare discriminant molecular features with cellular features of reactive gliosis.
Results - IIR increased the area of the crush site that was occupied by a dense cellular infiltrate and mass spectral features consistent with lysosome-specific lipids. IIR also increased immunohistochemical labeling for microglia and macrophages. IIR enhanced clearance of lipid sulfatide myelin-associated inhibitors of axon growth and accumulation of simple GM3 gangliosides in a spatial distribution consistent with degradation of plasma membrane from degenerated axons.
Conclusions - IIR promotes a robust phagocytic response that improves clearance of myelin and axon debris. This growth-permissive molecular remodeling of the crush injury site extends our current understanding of IIR to include mechanisms extrinsic to the RGC.
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17 MeSH Terms
Immediate Enhancement of Nerve Function Using a Novel Axonal Fusion Device After Neurotmesis.
Riley DC, Boyer RB, Deister CA, Pollins AC, Cardwell NL, Kelm ND, Does MD, Dortch RD, Bamba R, Shack RB, Thayer WP
(2017) Ann Plast Surg 79: 590-599
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Delivery Systems, Electromyography, Female, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Nerve Regeneration, Neurosurgical Procedures, Peripheral Nerve Injuries, Polyethylene Glycols, Random Allocation, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Recovery of Function, Sciatic Nerve, Trauma, Nervous System
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2018
BACKGROUND - The management of peripheral nerve injuries remains a large challenge for plastic surgeons. With the inability to fuse axonal endings, results after microsurgical nerve repair have been inconsistent. Our current nerve repair strategies rely upon the slow and lengthy process of axonal regeneration (~1 mm/d). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been investigated as a potential axonal fusion agent; however, the percentage of axonal fusion has been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to identify a PEG delivery device to standardize outcomes after attempted axonal fusion with PEG.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We used a rat sciatic nerve injury model in which we completely transected and repaired the left sciatic nerve to evaluate the efficacy of PEG fusion over a span of 12 weeks. In addition, we evaluated the effectiveness of a delivery device's ability to optimize results after PEG fusion.
RESULTS - We found that PEG rapidly (within minutes) restores axonal continuity as assessed by electrophysiology, fluorescent retrograde tracer, and diffusion tensor imaging. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that motor axon counts are significantly increased at 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks postoperatively in PEG-treated animals. Furthermore, PEG restored behavioral functions up to 50% compared with animals that received the criterion standard epineurial repair (control animals).
CONCLUSIONS - The ability of PEG to rapidly restore nerve function after neurotmesis could have vast implications on the clinical management of traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves.
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A critical period for the trophic actions of leptin on AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.
Kamitakahara A, Bouyer K, Wang CH, Simerly R
(2018) J Comp Neurol 526: 133-145
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Agouti-Related Protein, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus, Axons, ELAV-Like Protein 3, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Female, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Integrases, Leptin, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neurons, Neuropeptide Y, Receptors, Leptin, STAT3 Transcription Factor
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2019
In the developing hypothalamus, the fat-derived hormone leptin stimulates the growth of axons from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) to other regions that control energy balance. These projections are significantly reduced in leptin deficient (Lep ) mice and this phenotype is largely rescued by neonatal leptin treatments. However, treatment of mature Lep mice is ineffective, suggesting that the trophic action of leptin is limited to a developmental critical period. To temporally delineate closure of this critical period for leptin-stimulated growth, we treated Lep mice with exogenous leptin during a variety of discrete time periods, and measured the density of Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP) containing projections from the ARH to the ventral part of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMHv), and to the medial parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus (PVHmp). The results indicate that leptin loses its neurotrophic potential at or near postnatal day 28. The duration of leptin exposure appears to be important, with 9- or 11-day treatments found to be more effective than shorter (5-day) treatments. Furthermore, leptin treatment for 9 days or more was sufficient to restore AgRP innervation to both the PVHmp and DMHv in Lep females, but only to the DMHv in Lep males. Together, these findings reveal that the trophic actions of leptin are contingent upon timing and duration of leptin exposure, display both target and sex specificity, and that modulation of leptin-dependent circuit formation by each of these factors may carry enduring consequences for feeding behavior, metabolism, and obesity risk.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Embryonic Mutant Huntingtin Aggregate Formation in Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease.
Osmand AP, Bichell TJ, Bowman AB, Bates GP
(2016) J Huntingtons Dis 5: 343-346
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Brain, Disease Models, Animal, Huntingtin Protein, Huntington Disease, Immunohistochemistry, Mice, Transgenic, Protein Aggregation, Pathological
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The role of aggregate formation in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD) remains uncertain. However, the temporal appearance of aggregates tends to correlate with the onset of symptoms and the numbers of neuropil aggregates correlate with the progression of clinical disease. Using highly sensitive immunohistochemical methods we have detected the appearance of diffuse aggregates during embryonic development in the R6/2 and YAC128 mouse models of HD. These are initially seen in developing axonal tracts and appear to spread throughout the cerebrum in the early neonate.
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9 MeSH Terms
Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration.
Byrne AB, McWhirter RD, Sekine Y, Strittmatter SM, Miller DM, Hammarlund M
(2016) Elife 5:
MeSH Terms: ADP Ribose Transferases, Animals, Axons, Caenorhabditis elegans, Glycoside Hydrolases, Poly ADP Ribosylation, Regeneration
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration.
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KCC3 deficiency-induced disruption of paranodal loops and impairment of axonal excitability in the peripheral nervous system.
Sun YT, Tzeng SF, Lin TS, Hsu KS, Delpire E, Shen MR
(2016) Neuroscience 335: 91-102
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Axons, Genotype, Mice, Knockout, Peripheral Nervous System, Symporters
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
The autosomal recessive Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum (HMSN/ACC) is associated with the dysfunction of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter type 3 (KCC3), which is an electroneutral cotransporter. We previously found that the inhibition of KCC3 cotransporter activity reduces the propagation of action potentials in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, the pathogenesis by which KCC3 deficiency impairs peripheral nerve function remains to be examined. Thus, we conducted imaging and electrophysiological studies in the peripheral nerves of KCC3(-/-) mice at various ages. Analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an age-dependent progressive swelling of microvilli and disorganization of paranodal loops in KCC3(-/-) nerves. Yet, no mislocated voltage-dependent channels were observed between the nodes and juxtaparanodes of KCC3(-/-) nerves. However, electrophysiological studies using the threshold tracking technique indicated a reduced stimulus-response curve slope with an elevated rheobase, a decreased strength-duration time constant, diminished persistent Na(+) currents, and an outward deviation of threshold electrotonus in KCC3(-/-) nerves compared to wild-type nerves. These functional changes indicate an overall reduction in axonal excitability and suggest an increase in paranodal conductance, which was relevant to the pathology at the paranode. Altogether, our findings highlight the importance of KCC3 in maintaining paranodal integrity and in optimizing the propagation of action potentials along peripheral nerves.
Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
Fast and simplified mapping of mean axon diameter using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.
Xu J, Li H, Li K, Harkins KD, Jiang X, Xie J, Kang H, Dortch RD, Anderson AW, Does MD, Gore JC
(2016) NMR Biomed 29: 400-10
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Axons, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Female, Humans, Male, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 25, 2016
Mapping axon diameter is of interest for the potential diagnosis and monitoring of various neuronal pathologies. Advanced diffusion-weighted MRI methods have been developed to measure mean axon diameters non-invasively, but suffer major drawbacks that prevent their direct translation into clinical practice, such as complex non-linear data fitting and, more importantly, long scanning times that are usually not tolerable for most human subjects. In the current study, temporal diffusion spectroscopy using oscillating diffusion gradients was used to measure mean axon diameters with high sensitivity to small axons in the central nervous system. Axon diameters have been found to be correlated with a novel metric, DDR⊥ (the rate of dispersion of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient with gradient frequency), which is a model-free quantity that does not require complex data analyses and can be obtained from two diffusion coefficient measurements in clinically relevant times with conventional MRI machines. A comprehensive investigation including computer simulations and animal experiments ex vivo showed that measurements of DDR⊥ agree closely with histological data. In humans in vivo, DDR⊥ was also found to correlate well with reported mean axon diameters in human corpus callosum, and the total scan time was only about 8 min. In conclusion, DDR⊥ may have potential to serve as a fast, simple and model-free approach to map the mean axon diameter of white matter in clinics for assessing axon diameter changes.
Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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9 MeSH Terms
Glial coverage in the optic nerve expands in proportion to optic axon loss in chronic mouse glaucoma.
Bosco A, Breen KT, Anderson SR, Steele MR, Calkins DJ, Vetter ML
(2016) Exp Eye Res 150: 34-43
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Axons, Chronic Disease, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Glaucoma, Gliosis, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, Microscopy, Confocal, Neuroglia, Optic Nerve, Optic Nerve Diseases, Photomicrography, Retinal Ganglion Cells
Show Abstract · Added February 8, 2016
Within the white matter, axonal loss by neurodegeneration is coupled to glial cell changes in gene expression, structure and function commonly termed gliosis. Recently, we described the highly variable expansion of gliosis alebosco@neuro.utah.edu in degenerative optic nerves from the DBA/2J mouse model of chronic, age-related glaucoma. Here, to estimate and compare the levels of axonal loss with the expansion of glial coverage and axonal degeneration in DBA/2J nerves, we combined semiautomatic axon counts with threshold-based segmentation of total glial/scar areas and degenerative axonal profiles in plastic cross-sections. In nerves ranging from mild to severe degeneration, we found that the progression of axonal dropout is coupled to an increase of gliotic area. We detected a strong correlation between axon loss and the aggregate coverage by glial cells and scar, whereas axon loss did not correlate with the small fraction of degenerating profiles. Nerves with low to medium levels of axon loss displayed moderate glial reactivity, consisting of hypertrophic astrocytes, activated microglia and normal distribution of oligodendrocytes, with minimal reorganization of the tissue architecture. In contrast, nerves with extensive axonal loss showed prevalent rearrangement of the nerve, with loss of axon fascicle territories and enlarged or almost continuous gliotic and scar domains, containing reactive astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and activated microglia. These findings support the value of optic nerve gliotic expansion as a quantitative estimate of optic neuropathy that correlates with axon loss, applicable to grade the severity of optic nerve damage in mouse chronic glaucoma.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Early astrocyte redistribution in the optic nerve precedes axonopathy in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma.
Cooper ML, Crish SD, Inman DM, Horner PJ, Calkins DJ
(2016) Exp Eye Res 150: 22-33
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Axons, Disease Models, Animal, Glaucoma, Open-Angle, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, Nerve Degeneration, Optic Nerve, Optic Nerve Diseases, Photomicrography, Retinal Ganglion Cells, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 8, 2016
Glaucoma challenges the survival of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve through processes dependent on both aging and ocular pressure. Relevant stressors likely include complex interplay between axons and astrocytes, both in the retina and optic nerve. In the DBA/2J mouse model of pigmentary glaucoma, early progression involves axonopathy characterized by loss of functional transport prior to outright degeneration. Here we describe novel features of early pathogenesis in the DBA/2J nerve. With age the cross-sectional area of the nerve increases; this is associated generally with diminished axon packing density and survival and increased glial coverage of the nerve. However, for nerves with the highest axon density, as the nerve expands mean cross-sectional axon area enlarges as well. This early expansion was marked by disorganized axoplasm and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated neurofilamants indicative of axonopathy. Axon expansion occurs without loss up to a critical threshold for size (about 0.45-0.50 μm(2)), above which additional expansion tightly correlates with frank loss of axons. As well, early axon expansion prior to degeneration is concurrent with decreased astrocyte ramification with redistribution of processes towards the nerve edge. As axons expand beyond the critical threshold for loss, glial area resumes an even distribution from the center to edge of the nerve. We also found that early axon expansion is accompanied by reduced numbers of mitochondria per unit area in the nerve. Finally, our data indicate that both IOP and nerve expansion are associated with axon enlargement and reduced axon density for aged nerves. Collectively, our data support the hypothesis that diminished bioenergetic resources in conjunction with early nerve and glial remodeling could be a primary inducer of progression of axon pathology in glaucoma.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms