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Platelet transfusion does not improve outcomes in patients with brain injury on antiplatelet therapy.
Holzmacher JL, Reynolds C, Patel M, Maluso P, Holland S, Gamsky N, Moore H, Acquista E, Carrick M, Amdur R, Hancock H, Metzler M, Dunn J, Sarani B
(2018) Brain Inj 32: 325-330
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aspirin, Brain Injuries, Clopidogrel, Female, Humans, Injury Severity Score, Length of Stay, Male, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Platelet Transfusion, Statistics, Nonparametric, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Platelet dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with worse outcomes. The efficacy of platelet transfusion to reverse antiplatelet medication (APM) remains unknown. Thrombelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) assesses platelet function. We hypothesize that platelet transfusion can reverse the effects of APM but does not improve outcomes following TBI.
METHODS - An observational study at six US trauma centres was performed. Adult patients on APM with CT evident TBI after blunt injury were enrolled. Demographics, brain CT and TEG-PM results before/after platelet transfusion, length of stay (LOS), and injury severity score (ISS) were abstracted.
RESULTS - Sixty six patients were enrolled (89% aspirin, 50% clopidogrel, 23% dual APM) with 23 patients undergoing platelet transfusion. Transfused patients had significantly higher ISS and admission CT scores. Platelet transfusion significantly reduced platelet inhibition due to aspirin (76.0 ± 30.2% to 52.7 ± 31.5%, p < 0.01), but had a non-significant impact on clopidogrel-associated inhibition (p = 0.07). Platelet transfusion was associated with longer length of stay (7.8 vs. 3.5 days, p < 0.01), but there were no differences in mortality.
CONCLUSION - Platelet transfusion significantly decreases platelet inhibition due to aspirin but is not associated with change in outcomes in patients on APM following TBI.
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14 MeSH Terms
Aspirin for Sepsis Prophylaxis: An Ounce of Prevention?
Casey JD, Semler MW, Bastarache JA
(2017) Crit Care Med 45: 1959-1960
MeSH Terms: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Aspirin, Humans, Sepsis
Added May 31, 2018
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4 MeSH Terms
Use of common analgesic medications and ovarian cancer survival: results from a pooled analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.
Dixon SC, Nagle CM, Wentzensen N, Trabert B, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Schildkraut JM, Moysich KB, deFazio A, Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group, Risch HA, Rossing MA, Doherty JA, Wicklund KG, Goodman MT, Modugno F, Ness RB, Edwards RP, Jensen A, Kjær SK, Høgdall E, Berchuck A, Cramer DW, Terry KL, Poole EM, Bandera EV, Paddock LE, Anton-Culver H, Ziogas A, Menon U, Gayther SA, Ramus SJ, Gentry-Maharaj A, Pearce CL, Wu AH, Pike MC, Webb PM
(2017) Br J Cancer 116: 1223-1228
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Adult, Aged, Analgesics, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Anticarcinogenic Agents, Aspirin, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Ovarian Neoplasms, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with improved survival in some cancers, but evidence for ovarian cancer is limited.
METHODS - Pooling individual-level data from 12 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies, we evaluated the association between self-reported, pre-diagnosis use of common analgesics and overall/progression-free/disease-specific survival among 7694 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (4273 deaths).
RESULTS - Regular analgesic use (at least once per week) was not associated with overall survival (pooled hazard ratios, pHRs (95% confidence intervals): aspirin 0.96 (0.88-1.04); non-aspirin NSAIDs 0.97 (0.89-1.05); acetaminophen 1.01 (0.93-1.10)), nor with progression-free/disease-specific survival. There was however a survival advantage for users of any NSAIDs in studies clearly defining non-use as less than once per week (pHR=0.89 (0.82-0.98)).
CONCLUSIONS - Although this study did not show a clear association between analgesic use and ovarian cancer survival, further investigation with clearer definitions of use and information about post-diagnosis use is warranted.
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Inhibition of the Biosynthesis of Prostaglandin E2 By Low-Dose Aspirin: Implications for Adenocarcinoma Metastasis.
Boutaud O, Sosa IR, Amin T, Oram D, Adler D, Hwang HS, Crews BC, Milne G, Harris BK, Hoeksema M, Knollmann BC, Lammers PE, Marnett LJ, Massion PP, Oates JA
(2016) Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 9: 855-865
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Aspirin, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dinoprostone, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Invasiveness
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
Meta-analyses have demonstrated that low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of developing adenocarcinoma metastasis, and when colon cancer is detected during aspirin treatment, there is a remarkable 83% reduction in risk of metastasis. As platelets participate in the metastatic process, the antiplatelet action of low-dose aspirin likely contributes to its antimetastatic effect. Cycloxooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E (PGE) also contributes to metastasis, and we addressed the hypothesis that low-dose aspirin also inhibits PGE biosynthesis. We show that low-dose aspirin inhibits systemic PGE biosynthesis by 45% in healthy volunteers (P < 0.0001). Aspirin is found to be more potent in colon adenocarcinoma cells than in the platelet, and in lung adenocarcinoma cells, its inhibition is equivalent to that in the platelet. Inhibition of COX by aspirin in colon cancer cells is in the context of the metastasis of colon cancer primarily to the liver, the organ exposed to the same high concentrations of aspirin as the platelet. We find that the interaction of activated platelets with lung adenocarcinoma cells upregulates COX-2 expression and PGE biosynthesis, and inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin inhibits PGE production by the platelet-tumor cell aggregates. In conclusion, low-dose aspirin has a significant effect on extraplatelet cyclooxygenase and potently inhibits COX-2 in lung and colon adenocarcinoma cells. This supports a hypothesis that the remarkable prevention of metastasis from adenocarcinomas, and particularly from colon adenocarcinomas, by low-dose aspirin results from its effect on platelet COX-1 combined with inhibition of PGE biosynthesis in metastasizing tumor cells. Cancer Prev Res; 9(11); 855-65. ©2016 AACR.
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Cardiovascular Effects of Androgen Deprivation Therapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: ABCDE Steps to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Prostate Cancer.
Bhatia N, Santos M, Jones LW, Beckman JA, Penson DF, Morgans AK, Moslehi J
(2016) Circulation 133: 537-41
MeSH Terms: Aged, Androgen Antagonists, Aspirin, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, Diabetes Mellitus, Exercise, Humans, Male, Prostatic Neoplasms, Treatment Outcome
Added February 4, 2016
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CYP2C19 and CES1 polymorphisms and efficacy of clopidogrel and aspirin dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.
Hoh BL, Gong Y, McDonough CW, Waters MF, Royster AJ, Sheehan TO, Burkley B, Langaee TY, Mocco J, Zuckerman SL, Mummareddy N, Stephens ML, Ingram C, Shaffer CM, Denny JC, Brilliant MH, Kitchner TE, Linneman JG, Roden DM, Johnson JA
(2016) J Neurosurg 124: 1746-51
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aspirin, Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases, Clopidogrel, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C19, Female, Gene Frequency, Genotyping Techniques, Heterozygote, Humans, Intracranial Arteriosclerosis, Ischemic Attack, Transient, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Myocardial Infarction, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Stroke, Ticlopidine
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
OBJECT Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) has a high risk of recurrent stroke. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP2C19 and CES1 are associated with adverse outcomes in cardiovascular patients, but have not been studied in ICAD. The authors studied CYP2C19 and CES1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in symptomatic ICAD patients. METHODS Genotype testing for CYP2C19*2, (*)3, (*)8, (*)17 and CES1 G143E was performed on 188 adult symptomatic ICAD patients from 3 medical centers who were medically managed with clopidogrel and aspirin. Testing was performed prospectively at 1 center, and retrospectively from a DNA sample biorepository at 2 centers. Multiple logistic regression and Cox regression analysis were performed to assess the association of these SNPs with the primary endpoint, which was a composite of transient ischemic attack (TIA), stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 12 months. RESULTS The primary endpoint occurred in 14.9% of the 188 cases. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the presence of the CYP2C19 loss of function (LOF) alleles *2, *3, and *8 in the medically managed patients was associated with lower odds of primary endpoint compared with wild-type homozygotes (odds ratio [OR] 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.62, p = 0.0101). Cox regression analysis demonstrated the CYP2C19 LOF carriers had a lower risk for the primary endpoint, with hazard ratio (HR) of 0.27 (95% CI 0.08-0.95), p = 0.041. A sensitivity analysis of a secondary composite endpoint of TIA, stroke, or death demonstrated a significant trend in multiple logistic regression analysis of CYP2C19 variants, with lower odds of secondary endpoint in patients carrying at least 1 LOF allele (*2, *3, *8) than in wild-type homozygotes (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.06-1.16, p = 0.078). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the carriers of CYP2C19 LOF alleles had a lower risk forthe secondary composite endpoint (HR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-1.04, p = 0.056). CONCLUSIONS This is the first study examining genetic variants and their effects in symptomatic ICAD. Variant alleles of CYP2C19 (*2, *3, *8) were associated with lower odds of the primary and secondary composite endpoints. However, the direction of the association was opposite of what is expected based on this SNP. This may reflect an incomplete understanding of this genetic variation and its effect in symptomatic ICAD and warrants further investigations.
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20 MeSH Terms
Urinary metabolites of prostanoids and risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas in the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study (AFPPS).
Fedirko V, Bradshaw PT, Figueiredo JC, Sandler RS, Barry EL, Ahnen DJ, Milne GL, Bresalier RS, Baron JA
(2015) Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 8: 1061-8
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Administration, Oral, Aged, Aspirin, Chromatography, Gas, Chromatography, Liquid, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Double-Blind Method, Female, Folic Acid, Humans, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Poisson Distribution, Prostaglandins
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2016
Aspirin has been shown to protect against colorectal neoplasms; however, the optimal chemopreventive dose and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We aimed to study the relationship between prostanoid metabolites and aspirin's effect on adenoma occurrence. We used data from the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study, in which 1,121 participants with a recent adenoma were randomized to placebo or two doses of aspirin (81 or 325 mg/d) to be taken until the next surveillance colonoscopy, anticipated about 3 years later. Urinary metabolites of prostanoids (PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2) were measured using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or GC/NICI-MS in 876 participants near the end of treatment follow-up. Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 levels were 28%, 37%, and 60% proportionately lower, respectively, in individuals who took 325 mg of aspirin compared with individuals who took placebo (all P < 0.001). Similarly, among individuals who took 81 mg of aspirin, PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 were, respectively, 18%, 30%, and 57% proportionally lower compared with placebo (all P < 0.005). None of the metabolites or their ratios were statistically significantly associated with the risk of adenoma occurrence. The effect of aspirin in reducing adenoma risk was independent of prostanoid levels. Aspirin use is associated with lower levels of urinary prostanoid metabolites. However, our findings do not support the hypothesis that these metabolites are associated with adenoma occurrence, suggesting that COX-dependent mechanisms may not completely explain the chemopreventive effect of aspirin on colorectal neoplasms.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Platelet response to increased aspirin dose in patients with persistent platelet aggregation while treated with aspirin 81 mg.
Gengo F, Westphal ES, Rainka MM, Janda M, Robson MJ, Hourihane JM, Bates V
(2016) J Clin Pharmacol 56: 414-21
MeSH Terms: Aspirin, Blood Coagulation Tests, Blood Platelets, Collagen, Drug Resistance, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Platelet Function Tests
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2015
This study demonstrates that patients who are taking 81 mg of aspirin and are nonresponsive benefit from a dose of 162 mg or greater vs a different antiplatelet therapy. We identified 100 patients who were nonresponsive to aspirin 81 mg via whole blood aggregometry and observed how many patients became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or greater. Platelet nonresponsiveness was defined as >10 Ω of resistance to collagen 1 µg/mL and/or an ohms ratio of collagen 1 µg/mL to collagen 5 µg/mL >0.5 and/or >6 Ω to arachidonate. Borderline response was defined as an improvement in 1 but not both of the above criteria. Of the initial 100 patients who were nonresponsive to an aspirin dose of 81 mg, 79% became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or >162 mg. Only 6% did not respond to any increase in dose. We believe that patients treated with low-dose aspirin who have significant risk for secondary vascular events should be individually assessed to determine their antiplatelet response. Those found to have persistent platelet aggregation despite treatment with 81 mg of aspirin have a higher likelihood of obtaining an adequate antiplatelet response at a higher aspirin dose.
© 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.
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12 MeSH Terms
Aromatic hydroxylation of salicylic acid and aspirin by human cytochromes P450.
Bojić M, Sedgeman CA, Nagy LD, Guengerich FP
(2015) Eur J Pharm Sci 73: 49-56
MeSH Terms: Aspirin, Benzaldehydes, Biotransformation, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, Deferoxamine, Enzyme Inhibitors, Humans, Hydroxylation, Isoenzymes, Microsomes, Liver, NADP, Organophosphates, Oxidation-Reduction, Reactive Oxygen Species, Recombinant Proteins, Salicylic Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a well-known and widely-used analgesic. It is rapidly deacetylated to salicylic acid, which forms two hippuric acids-salicyluric acid and gentisuric acid-and two glucuronides. The oxidation of aspirin and salicylic acid has been reported with human liver microsomes, but data on individual cytochromes P450 involved in oxidation is lacking. In this study we monitored oxidation of these compounds by human liver microsomes and cytochrome P450 (P450) using UPLC with fluorescence detection. Microsomal oxidation of salicylic acid was much faster than aspirin. The two oxidation products were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid, documented by its UV and mass spectrum) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Formation of neither product was inhibited by desferrioxamine, suggesting a lack of contribution of oxygen radicals under these conditions. Although more liphophilic, aspirin was oxidized less efficiently, primarily to the 2,5-dihydroxy product. Recombinant human P450s 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4 all catalyzed the 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid. Inhibitor studies with human liver microsomes indicated that all six of the previously mentioned P450s could contribute to both the 5- and 3-hydroxylation of salicylic acid and that P450s 2A6 and 2B6 have contributions to 5-hydroxylation. Inhibitor studies indicated that the major human P450 involved in both 3- and 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid is P450 2E1.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Association between Regular Aspirin Use and Circulating Markers of Inflammation: A Study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.
Lang Kuhs KA, Hildesheim A, Trabert B, Kemp TJ, Purdue MP, Wentzensen N, Katki HA, Pinto LA, Loftfield E, Safaeian M, Chaturvedi AK, Shiels MS
(2015) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 24: 825-32
MeSH Terms: Aged, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Aspirin, Biomarkers, Colorectal Neoplasms, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Ibuprofen, Inflammation, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Ovarian Neoplasms, Prostatic Neoplasms, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2017
BACKGROUND - Regular aspirin use may decrease cancer risk by reducing chronic inflammation. However, associations between aspirin use and circulating markers of inflammation have not been well studied.
METHODS - Serum levels of 78 inflammatory markers were measured in 1,819 55- to 74-year-old men and women in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Data were combined from three completed case-control studies and reweighted to the PLCO screening arm. Self-reported aspirin and ibuprofen use (number of tablets taken per day/week/month) over the previous 12 months was collected at baseline. Associations between (i) nonregular (<4 tablets/month), (ii) low (1-4 tablets/week), (iii) moderate (1 tablet/day), or (iv) high (2+ tablets/day) regular aspirin or ibuprofen use and marker levels were assessed with weighted logistic regression.
RESULTS - Aspirin use was nominally associated with (Ptrend across categories ≤ 0.05) decreased levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 15 [CCL15; OR, 0.5; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.3-0.8; moderate versus nonregular use]; soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2; OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0); soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1; OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) and increased levels of CCL13 (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.8-2.1); CCL17 (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.7-1.9) and interleukin 4 (IL4; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.8). Trends were not statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Likewise, no statistically significant associations were observed between ibuprofen use and marker levels.
CONCLUSIONS - No significant associations were observed between regular aspirin use and the inflammatory markers assessed.
IMPACT - Additional studies are needed to better understand the relationship between aspirin use, chronic inflammation, and cancer risk.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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