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Reconstructing the Backbone of the Saccharomycotina Yeast Phylogeny Using Genome-Scale Data.
Shen XX, Zhou X, Kominek J, Kurtzman CP, Hittinger CT, Rokas A
(2016) G3 (Bethesda) 6: 3927-3939
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Computational Biology, Genetic Markers, Genome, Fungal, Genomics, Phylogeny, Workflow
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Understanding the phylogenetic relationships among the yeasts of the subphylum Saccharomycotina is a prerequisite for understanding the evolution of their metabolisms and ecological lifestyles. In the last two decades, the use of rDNA and multilocus data sets has greatly advanced our understanding of the yeast phylogeny, but many deep relationships remain unsupported. In contrast, phylogenomic analyses have involved relatively few taxa and lineages that were often selected with limited considerations for covering the breadth of yeast biodiversity. Here we used genome sequence data from 86 publicly available yeast genomes representing nine of the 11 known major lineages and 10 nonyeast fungal outgroups to generate a 1233-gene, 96-taxon data matrix. Species phylogenies reconstructed using two different methods (concatenation and coalescence) and two data matrices (amino acids or the first two codon positions) yielded identical and highly supported relationships between the nine major lineages. Aside from the lineage comprised by the family Pichiaceae, all other lineages were monophyletic. Most interrelationships among yeast species were robust across the two methods and data matrices. However, eight of the 93 internodes conflicted between analyses or data sets, including the placements of: the clade defined by species that have reassigned the CUG codon to encode serine, instead of leucine; the clade defined by a whole genome duplication; and the species Ascoidea rubescens These phylogenomic analyses provide a robust roadmap for future comparative work across the yeast subphylum in the disciplines of taxonomy, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, ecology, and biotechnology. To further this end, we have also provided a BLAST server to query the 86 Saccharomycotina genomes, which can be found at http://y1000plus.org/blast.
Copyright © 2016 Shen et al.
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7 MeSH Terms
Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts.
Riley R, Haridas S, Wolfe KH, Lopes MR, Hittinger CT, Göker M, Salamov AA, Wisecaver JH, Long TM, Calvey CH, Aerts AL, Barry KW, Choi C, Clum A, Coughlan AY, Deshpande S, Douglass AP, Hanson SJ, Klenk HP, LaButti KM, Lapidus A, Lindquist EA, Lipzen AM, Meier-Kolthoff JP, Ohm RA, Otillar RP, Pangilinan JL, Peng Y, Rokas A, Rosa CA, Scheuner C, Sibirny AA, Slot JC, Stielow JB, Sun H, Kurtzman CP, Blackwell M, Grigoriev IV, Jeffries TW
(2016) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113: 9882-7
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Biotechnology, Evolution, Molecular, Fungal Proteins, Genetic Code, Genome, Fungal, Genomics, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Phylogeny, Species Specificity, Yeasts
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Ascomycete yeasts are metabolically diverse, with great potential for biotechnology. Here, we report the comparative genome analysis of 29 taxonomically and biotechnologically important yeasts, including 16 newly sequenced. We identify a genetic code change, CUG-Ala, in Pachysolen tannophilus in the clade sister to the known CUG-Ser clade. Our well-resolved yeast phylogeny shows that some traits, such as methylotrophy, are restricted to single clades, whereas others, such as l-rhamnose utilization, have patchy phylogenetic distributions. Gene clusters, with variable organization and distribution, encode many pathways of interest. Genomics can predict some biochemical traits precisely, but the genomic basis of others, such as xylose utilization, remains unresolved. Our data also provide insight into early evolution of ascomycetes. We document the loss of H3K9me2/3 heterochromatin, the origin of ascomycete mating-type switching, and panascomycete synteny at the MAT locus. These data and analyses will facilitate the engineering of efficient biosynthetic and degradative pathways and gateways for genomic manipulation.
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11 MeSH Terms
Clustering of two genes putatively involved in cyanate detoxification evolved recently and independently in multiple fungal lineages.
Elmore MH, McGary KL, Wisecaver JH, Slot JC, Geiser DM, Sink S, O'Donnell K, Rokas A
(2015) Genome Biol Evol 7: 789-800
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Carbon-Nitrogen Lyases, Carbonic Anhydrases, Cyanates, Evolution, Molecular, Fusarium, Gene Duplication, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genes, Fungal, Multigene Family, Phylogeny
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC's closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture.
© The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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11 MeSH Terms
The evolution of fungal metabolic pathways.
Wisecaver JH, Slot JC, Rokas A
(2014) PLoS Genet 10: e1004816
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Duplication, Gene Regulatory Networks, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genes, Fungal, Genome, Fungal, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Multigene Family, Phylogeny
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters represent hotspots for the generation of fungal metabolic diversity.
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10 MeSH Terms
Ecology drives the distribution of specialized tyrosine metabolism modules in fungi.
Greene GH, McGary KL, Rokas A, Slot JC
(2014) Genome Biol Evol 6: 121-32
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Ecosystem, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genes, Fungal, Gentisates, Multigene Family, Stilbenes, Tyrosine
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
Gene clusters encoding accessory or environmentally specialized metabolic pathways likely play a significant role in the evolution of fungal genomes. Two such gene clusters encoding enzymes associated with the tyrosine metabolism pathway (KEGG #00350) have been identified in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The l-tyrosine degradation (TD) gene cluster encodes a functional module that facilitates breakdown of the phenolic amino acid, l-tyrosine through a homogentisate intermediate, but is also involved in the production of pyomelanin, a fungal pathogenicity factor. The gentisate catabolism (GC) gene cluster encodes a functional module likely involved in phenolic compound degradation, which may enable metabolism of biphenolic stilbenes in multiple lineages. Our investigation of the evolution of the TD and GC gene clusters in 214 fungal genomes revealed spotty distributions partially shaped by gene cluster loss and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Specifically, a TD gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between the extremophilic, melanized fungi Exophiala dermatitidis and Baudoinia compniacensis, and a GC gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between Sordariomycete and Dothideomycete grass pathogens. These results suggest that the distribution of specialized tyrosine metabolism modules is influenced by both the ecology and phylogeny of fungal species.
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9 MeSH Terms
Multiple GAL pathway gene clusters evolved independently and by different mechanisms in fungi.
Slot JC, Rokas A
(2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107: 10136-41
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Base Sequence, Biological Evolution, Candida, Cryptococcus, DNA, Fungal, Evolution, Molecular, Fungi, Galactose, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genes, Fungal, Models, Genetic, Multigene Family, Phylogeny, Saccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
A notable characteristic of fungal genomes is that genes involved in successive steps of a metabolic pathway are often physically linked or clustered. To investigate how such clusters of functionally related genes are assembled and maintained, we examined the evolution of gene sequences and order in the galactose utilization (GAL) pathway in whole-genome data from 80 diverse fungi. We found that GAL gene clusters originated independently and by different mechanisms in three unrelated yeast lineages. Specifically, the GAL cluster found in Saccharomyces and Candida yeasts originated through the relocation of native unclustered genes, whereas the GAL cluster of Schizosaccharomyces yeasts was acquired through horizontal gene transfer from a Candida yeast. In contrast, the GAL cluster of Cryptococcus yeasts was assembled independently from the Saccharomyces/Candida and Schizosaccharomyces GAL clusters and coexists in the Cryptococcus genome with unclustered GAL paralogs. These independently evolved GAL clusters represent a striking example of analogy at the genomic level. We also found that species with GAL clusters exhibited significantly higher rates of GAL pathway loss than species with unclustered GAL genes. These results suggest that clustering of metabolic genes might facilitate fungal adaptation to changing environments both through the acquisition and loss of metabolic capacities.
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16 MeSH Terms
Cytotoxic cytochalasin metabolites of endophytic Endothia gyrosa.
Xu S, Ge HM, Song YC, Shen Y, Ding H, Tan RX
(2009) Chem Biodivers 6: 739-45
MeSH Terms: Ascomycota, Cell Line, Tumor, Cytochalasins, Dipterocarpaceae, Humans, K562 Cells, Plant Leaves, Symbiosis
Show Abstract · Added April 14, 2017
In addition to the known metabolites cytochalasin H (1), cytochalasin J (2), and epoxycytochalasin H (3), two new 10-phenyl-(11)-cytochalasans, named cytochalasin Z10 and Z11 (4 and 5, resp.) were isolated from the solid substrate culture of Endothia gyrosa IFB-E023, an endophytic fungus residing inside the healthy leaf of Vatica mangachapo (Dipterocarpaceae). The structure determination of 4 and 5 was accomplished through correlative analyses of their spectral data (UV, ESI-MS, IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, COSY, NOESY, HMQC, and HMBC). Metabolites 1-5 were demonstrated to be substantially cytotoxic to the human leukaemia K562 cell line with the IC(50) values of 10.1, 1.5, 24.5, 28.3, and 24.4 microM, respectively, which are comparable to that of 5-fluorouracil (33.0 microM), co-assayed as the positive reference.
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8 MeSH Terms