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Lipoxygenase-catalyzed transformation of epoxy fatty acids to hydroxy-endoperoxides: a potential P450 and lipoxygenase interaction.
Teder T, Boeglin WE, Brash AR
(2014) J Lipid Res 55: 2587-96
MeSH Terms: 8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic Acid, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase, Biocatalysis, Blood Platelets, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Eicosanoids, Epoxy Compounds, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Hydroxylation, Linolenic Acids, Lipid Peroxides, Lipoxygenase, Mice, Molecular Structure, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Recombinant Proteins, Soybean Proteins, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Stereoisomerism
Show Abstract · Added January 21, 2015
Herein, we characterize a generally applicable transformation of fatty acid epoxides by lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes that results in the formation of a five-membered endoperoxide ring in the end product. We demonstrated this transformation using soybean LOX-1 in the metabolism of 15,16-epoxy-α-linolenic acid, and murine platelet-type 12-LOX and human 15-LOX-1 in the metabolism of 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET). A detailed examination of the transformation of the two enantiomers of 15,16-epoxy-α-linolenic acid by soybean LOX-1 revealed that the expected primary product, a 13S-hydroperoxy-15,16-epoxide, underwent a nonenzymatic transformation in buffer into a new derivative that was purified by HPLC and identified by UV, LC-MS, and ¹H-NMR as a 13,15-endoperoxy-16-hydroxy-octadeca-9,11-dienoic acid. The configuration of the endoperoxide (cis or trans side chains) depended on the steric relationship of the new hydroperoxy moiety to the enantiomeric configuration of the fatty acid epoxide. The reaction mechanism involves intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SNi) between the hydroperoxy (nucleophile) and epoxy group (electrophile). Equivalent transformations were documented in metabolism of the enantiomers of 14,15-EET by the two mammalian LOX enzymes, 15-LOX-1 and platelet-type 12-LOX. We conclude that this type of transformation could occur naturally with the co-occurrence of LOX and cytochrome P450 or peroxygenase enzymes, and it could also contribute to the complexity of products formed in the autoxidation reactions of polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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23 MeSH Terms
The importance of the lipoxygenase-hepoxilin pathway in the mammalian epidermal barrier.
Muñoz-Garcia A, Thomas CP, Keeney DS, Zheng Y, Brash AR
(2014) Biochim Biophys Acta 1841: 401-8
MeSH Terms: 8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic Acid, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Ceramides, Epidermis, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Lipoxygenase
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
This review covers the background to discovery of the two key lipoxygenases (LOX) involved in epidermal barrier function, 12R-LOX and eLOX3, and our current views on their functioning. In the outer epidermis, their consecutive actions oxidize linoleic acid esterified in ω-hydroxy-ceramide to a hepoxilin-related derivative. The relevant background to hepoxilin and trioxilin biochemistry is briefly reviewed. We outline the evidence that linoleate in the ceramide is the natural substrate of the two LOX enzymes and our proposal for its importance in construction of the epidermal water barrier. Our hypothesis is that the oxidation promotes hydrolysis of the oxidized linoleate moiety from the ceramide. The resulting free ω-hydroxyl of the ω-hydroxyceramide is covalently bound to proteins on the surface of the corneocytes to form the corneocyte lipid envelope, a key barrier component. Understanding the role of the LOX enzymes and their hepoxilin products should provide rational approaches to ameliorative therapy for a number of the congenital ichthyoses involving compromised barrier function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.
© 2013.
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8 MeSH Terms
12-lipoxygenase activity plays an important role in PAR4 and GPVI-mediated platelet reactivity.
Yeung J, Apopa PL, Vesci J, Stolla M, Rai G, Simeonov A, Jadhav A, Fernandez-Perez P, Maloney DJ, Boutaud O, Holman TR, Holinstat M
(2013) Thromb Haemost 110: 569-81
MeSH Terms: 12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Blood Platelets, Cyclooxygenase 1, Eicosanoids, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Platelet Activation, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Thrombin, Thrombosis, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Following initial platelet activation, arachidonic acid is metabolised by cyclooxygenase-1 and 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX). While the role of 12-LOX in the platelet is not well defined, recent evidence suggests that it may be important for regulation of platelet activity and is agonist-specific in the manner in which it regulates platelet function. Using small molecule inhibitors selective for 12-LOX and 12-LOX-deficient mice, the role of 12-LOX in regulation of human platelet activation and thrombosis was investigated. Pharmacologically inhibiting 12-LOX resulted in attenuation of platelet aggregation, selective inhibition of dense versus alpha granule secretion, and inhibition of platelet adhesion under flow for PAR4 and collagen. Additionally, 12-LOX-deficient mice showed attenuated integrin activity to PAR4-AP and convulxin compared to wild-type mice. Finally, platelet activation by PARs was shown to be differentially dependent on COX-1 and 12-LOX with PAR1 relying on COX-1 oxidation of arachidonic acid while PAR4 being more dependent on 12-LOX for normal platelet function. These studies demonstrate an important role for 12-LOX in regulating platelet activation and thrombosis. Furthermore, the data presented here provide a basis for potentially targeting 12-LOX as a means to attenuate unwanted platelet activation and clot formation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Crystal structure of 12-lipoxygenase catalytic-domain-inhibitor complex identifies a substrate-binding channel for catalysis.
Xu S, Mueser TC, Marnett LJ, Funk MO
(2012) Structure 20: 1490-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Biocatalysis, Catalytic Domain, Coordination Complexes, Crystallography, X-Ray, Hydrogen Bonding, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Iron, Lipoxygenase Inhibitors, Models, Molecular, Oxygen, Phenylpropionates, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Sus scrofa
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2014
Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 Å) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Protein kinase C regulation of 12-lipoxygenase-mediated human platelet activation.
Yeung J, Apopa PL, Vesci J, Kenyon V, Rai G, Jadhav A, Simeonov A, Holman TR, Maloney DJ, Boutaud O, Holinstat M
(2012) Mol Pharmacol 81: 420-30
MeSH Terms: Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Blood Platelets, Blotting, Western, Calcium, Enzyme Activation, Flow Cytometry, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Lipoxygenase Inhibitors, Platelet Activation, Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex, Protein Kinase C, Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Platelet activation is important in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis. Uncontrolled activation of platelets may lead to arterial thrombosis, which is a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke. After activation, metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) may play a significant role in regulating the degree and stability of platelet activation because inhibition of 12-LOX significantly attenuates platelet aggregation in response to various agonists. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is also known to be an important regulator of platelet activity. Using a newly developed selective inhibitor for 12-LOX and a pan-PKC inhibitor, we investigated the role of PKC in 12-LOX-mediated regulation of agonist signaling in the platelet. To determine the role of PKC within the 12-LOX pathway, a number of biochemical endpoints were measured, including platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and integrin activation. Inhibition of 12-LOX or PKC resulted in inhibition of dense granule secretion and attenuation of both aggregation and αIIbβ(3) activation. However, activation of PKC downstream of 12-LOX inhibition rescued agonist-induced aggregation and integrin activation. Furthermore, inhibition of 12-LOX had no effect on PKC-mediated aggregation, indicating that 12-LOX is upstream of PKC. These studies support an essential role for PKC downstream of 12-LOX activation in human platelets and suggest 12-LOX as a possible target for antiplatelet therapy.
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13 MeSH Terms
Lipoxygenases mediate the effect of essential fatty acid in skin barrier formation: a proposed role in releasing omega-hydroxyceramide for construction of the corneocyte lipid envelope.
Zheng Y, Yin H, Boeglin WE, Elias PM, Crumrine D, Beier DR, Brash AR
(2011) J Biol Chem 286: 24046-56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Ceramides, Epidermis, Fatty Acids, Essential, Lipoxygenase, Mice, Oxidation-Reduction, Swine
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
A barrier to water loss is vital to maintaining life on dry land. Formation of the mammalian skin barrier requires both the essential fatty acid linoleate and the two lipoxygenases 12R-lipoxygenase (12R-LOX) and epidermal lipoxygenase-3 (eLOX3), although their roles are poorly understood. Linoleate occurs in O-linoleoyl-ω-hydroxyceramide, which, after hydrolysis of the linoleate moiety, is covalently attached to protein via the free ω-hydroxyl of the ceramide, forming the corneocyte lipid envelope, a scaffold between lipid and protein that helps seal the barrier. Here we show using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, GC-MS, and (1)H NMR that O-linoleoyl-ω-hydroxyceramide is oxygenated in a regio- and stereospecific fashion by the consecutive actions of 12R-LOX and eLOX3 and that these products occur naturally in pig and mouse epidermis. 12R-LOX forms 9R-hydroperoxy-linoleoyl-ω-hydroxyceramide, further converted by eLOX3 to specific epoxyalcohol (9R,10R-trans-epoxy-11E-13R-hydroxy) and 9-keto-10E,12Z esters of the ceramide; an epoxy-ketone derivative (9R,10R-trans-epoxy-11E-13-keto) is the most prominent oxidized ceramide in mouse skin. These products are absent in 12R-LOX-deficient mice, which crucially display a near total absence of protein-bound ω-hydroxyceramides and of the corneocyte lipid envelope and die shortly after birth from transepidermal water loss. We conclude that oxygenation of O-linoleoyl-ω-hydroxyceramide is required to facilitate the ester hydrolysis and allow bonding of the ω-hydroxyceramide to protein, providing a coherent explanation for the roles of multiple components in epidermal barrier function. Our study uncovers a hitherto unknown biochemical pathway in which the enzymic oxygenation of ceramides is involved in building a crucial structure of the epidermal barrier.
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9 MeSH Terms
Protease-activated receptor signaling in platelets activates cytosolic phospholipase A2α differently for cyclooxygenase-1 and 12-lipoxygenase catalysis.
Holinstat M, Boutaud O, Apopa PL, Vesci J, Bala M, Oates JA, Hamm HE
(2011) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31: 435-42
MeSH Terms: 1-Butanol, 12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Arachidonic Acid, Blood Platelets, Calcium, Chromones, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cytosol, Eicosanoids, Enzyme Inhibitors, Group IV Phospholipases A2, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Morpholines, Propranolol, Protein Kinase C, Receptors, Proteinase-Activated, Signal Transduction, Thromboxane A2, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
OBJECTIVE - The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) by platelets is activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2α) (cPLA(2α)), which releases arachidonic acid, which is the substrate for cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and 12-lipoxygenase. We evaluated signaling via the human platelet thrombin receptors, protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4, to the activation of cPLA(2α), which provides a substrate for the biosynthesis of TxA(2) and 12-HETE.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Stimulating washed human platelets resulted in delayed biosynthesis of 12-HETE, which continues after maximal formation of TxA(2) is completed, suggesting that 12-HETE is not formed by the same pool of arachidonic acid that provides a substrate to COX-1. PAR1-induced formation of TxA(2) was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol kinase inhibitor LY294002, whereas this inhibitor did not block 12-HETE biosynthesis. Both 1-butanol and propranolol also blocked TxA(2) biosynthesis but did not inhibit 12-HETE formation.
CONCLUSIONS - The concerted evidence indicates that the platelet thrombin receptors signal activation of cPLA(2α) coupled to COX-1 by a pathway different from that signaling activation of the cPLA(2α) coupled to 12-lipoxygenase.
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21 MeSH Terms
EPR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry reveal distinctive features of the iron site in leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase.
Rapp J, Xu S, Sharp AM, Griffith WP, Kim YW, Funk MO
(2009) Arch Biochem Biophys 490: 50-6
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Escherichia coli, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Iron, Leukocytes, Lipid Peroxides, Molecular Weight, Oxidation-Reduction, Recombinant Proteins, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Sus scrofa, Temperature, Transformation, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added April 14, 2017
The procedure for the expression and purification of recombinant porcine leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase using Escherichia coli [K.M. Richards, L.J. Marnett, Biochemistry 36 (1997) 6692-6699] was updated to make it possible to produce enough protein for physical measurements. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the amino acid sequence. The redox properties of the cofactor iron site were examined by EPR spectroscopy at 25K following treatment with a variety of fatty acid hydroperoxides. Combination of the enzyme in a stoichiometric ratio with the hydroperoxides led to a g4.3 signal in EPR spectra instead of the g6 signal characteristic of similarly treated soybean lipoxygenase-1. Native 12-lipoxygenase was also subjected to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. There was evidence for loss of the mass of an iron atom from the protein as the pH was lowered from 5 to 4. Native ions in these samples indicated that iron was lost without the protein completely unfolding.
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16 MeSH Terms
Oxidative metabolism of a fatty acid amide hydrolase-regulated lipid, arachidonoyltaurine.
Turman MV, Kingsley PJ, Rouzer CA, Cravatt BF, Marnett LJ
(2008) Biochemistry 47: 3917-25
MeSH Terms: Amidohydrolases, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase, Arachidonic Acids, Chromatography, Liquid, Cyclooxygenase 2, Female, Humans, Kinetics, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Oxidation-Reduction, Taurine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
A novel class of lipids, N-acyltaurines, was recently discovered in fatty acid amide hydrolase knockout mice. In some peripheral tissues, such as liver and kidney, N-acyltaurines with long, polyunsaturated acyl chains are most prevalent. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are converted to a variety of signaling molecules by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenases (LOXs). The ability of COXs and LOXs to oxygenate arachidonoyltaurine was evaluated to gain insight into the potential metabolic fate of N-acyltaurines. Although arachidonoyltaurine was a poor substrate for COXs, mammalian 12 S- and 15 S-LOXs oxygenated arachidonoyltaurine with similar or better efficiency than arachidonic acid. Products of arachidonoyltaurine oxygenation were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The positional specificity of single oxygenation was retained for 15 S-LOXs. However, platelet-type 12 S-LOX produced 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoyltaurines (HETE-Ts). Furthermore, LOXs generated dihydroxyeicosatetraenoyltaurines (diHETE-Ts). Metabolism of arachidonoyltaurine by murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPMs) was also profiled. Arachidonoyltaurine was rapidly taken up and converted primarily to 12-HETE-T. Over prolonged incubations, RPMs also generated small amounts of diHETE-T. Oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated N-acyltaurines may represent a pathway for the generation or termination of novel signaling molecules.
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15 MeSH Terms
A mouse mutation in the 12R-lipoxygenase, Alox12b, disrupts formation of the epidermal permeability barrier.
Moran JL, Qiu H, Turbe-Doan A, Yun Y, Boeglin WE, Brash AR, Beier DR
(2007) J Invest Dermatol 127: 1893-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Codon, Nonsense, Epidermis, Genotype, Ichthyosiform Erythroderma, Congenital, Mice, Permeability
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE) is a nonsyndromic form of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis characterized by hyperkeratosis and a disruption in the epidermal permeability barrier. Identification of mutations in two lipoxygenases (LOXs), ALOX12B (12R-LOX) and ALOXE3 (eLOX3), and further functional studies implicate ALOX12B and ALOXE3 in the etiology of NCIE. Here, we report a mutation in Alox12b in the recessive ethylnitrosurea-induced mouse mutant, mummy (Alox12b(mmy-Bei)). mummy mutants have red, scaly skin and die perinatally. Histologically, mummy mutants display defects in the epidermis. We mapped mummy to a 1.9 Mb interval on Chr. 11 containing Alox12b (12R-LOX), Aloxe3 (eLOX3) and Alox15b (8-LOX). Sequencing of all three genes identified a nonsense mutation in the catalytic domain of Alox12b. We demonstrate that mummy mutants have a disrupted epidermal permeability barrier and that the nonsense mutation in mummy abolishes the enzyme activity of 12R-LOX. The mummy mutant provides a mouse model for LOX-mediated NCIE and is the first described mouse mutant affecting epidermal barrier formation identified by forward genetics.
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8 MeSH Terms