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Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction in HIV-Infected Individuals in North America Compared With the General Population.
Drozd DR, Kitahata MM, Althoff KN, Zhang J, Gange SJ, Napravnik S, Burkholder GA, Mathews WC, Silverberg MJ, Sterling TR, Heckbert SR, Budoff MJ, Van Rompaey S, Delaney JAC, Wong C, Tong W, Palella FJ, Elion RA, Martin JN, Brooks JT, Jacobson LP, Eron JJ, Justice AC, Freiberg MS, Klein DB, Post WS, Saag MS, Moore RD, Crane HM
(2017) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 75: 568-576
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Comorbidity, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, North America, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Previous studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected individuals have been limited by the inability to validate and differentiate atherosclerotic type 1 myocardial infarctions (T1MIs) from other events. We sought to define the incidence of T1MIs and risk attributable to traditional and HIV-specific factors among participants in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) and compare adjusted incidence rates (IRs) to the general population Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort.
METHODS - We ascertained and adjudicated incident MIs among individuals enrolled in 7 NA-ACCORD cohorts between 1995 and 2014. We calculated IRs, adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRRs), and 95% confidence intervals of risk factors for T1MI using Poisson regression. We compared aIRRs of T1MIs in NA-ACCORD with those from ARIC.
RESULTS - Among 29,169 HIV-infected individuals, the IR for T1MIs was 2.57 (2.30 to 2.86) per 1000 person-years, and the aIRR was significantly higher compared with participants in ARIC [1.30 (1.09 to 1.56)]. In multivariable analysis restricted to HIV-infected individuals and including traditional CVD risk factors, the rate of T1MI increased with decreasing CD4 count [≥500 cells/μL: ref; 350-499 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.32 (0.98 to 1.77); 200-349 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.37 (1.01 to 1.86); 100-199 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.60 (1.09 to 2.34); <100 cells/μL: aIRR = 2.19 (1.44 to 3.33)]. Risk associated with detectable HIV RNA [<400 copies/mL: ref; ≥400 copies/mL: aIRR = 1.36 (1.06 to 1.75)] was significantly increased only when CD4 was excluded.
CONCLUSIONS - The higher incidence of T1MI in HIV-infected individuals and increased risk associated with lower CD4 count and detectable HIV RNA suggest that early suppressive antiretroviral treatment and aggressive management of traditional CVD risk factors are necessary to maximally reduce MI risk.
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17 MeSH Terms
Sex, Race, and HIV Risk Disparities in Discontinuity of HIV Care After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in the United States and Canada.
Rebeiro PF, Abraham AG, Horberg MA, Althoff KN, Yehia BR, Buchacz K, Lau BM, Sterling TR, Gange SJ
(2017) AIDS Patient Care STDS 31: 129-144
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Canada, Cohort Studies, HIV Infections, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk, Sex Factors, Substance Abuse, Intravenous, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Disruption of continuous retention in care (discontinuity) is associated with HIV disease progression. We examined sex, race, and HIV risk disparities in discontinuity after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among patients in North America. Adults (≥18 years of age) initiating ART from 2000 to 2010 were included. Discontinuity was defined as first disruption of continuous retention (≥2 visits separated by >90 days in the calendar year). Relative hazard ratio (HR) and times from ART initiation until discontinuity by race, sex, and HIV risk were assessed by modeling of the cumulative incidence function (CIF) in the presence of the competing risk of death. Models were adjusted for cohort site, baseline age, and CD4 cell count within 1 year before ART initiation; nadir CD4 cell count after ART, but before a study event, was assessed as a mediator. Among 17,171 adults initiating ART, median follow-up time was 3.97 years, and 49% were observed to have ≥1 discontinuity of care. In adjusted regression models, the hazard of discontinuity for patients was lower for females versus males [HR: 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-0.89] and higher for blacks versus nonblacks (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12-1.23) and persons with injection drug use (IDU) versus non-IDU risk (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.25-1.41). Sex, racial, and HIV risk differences in clinical retention exist, even accounting for access to care and known competing risks for discontinuity. These results point to vulnerable populations at greatest risk for discontinuity in need of improved outreach to prevent disruptions of HIV care.
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19 MeSH Terms
Rising Obesity Prevalence and Weight Gain Among Adults Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in the United States and Canada.
Koethe JR, Jenkins CA, Lau B, Shepherd BE, Justice AC, Tate JP, Buchacz K, Napravnik S, Mayor AM, Horberg MA, Blashill AJ, Willig A, Wester CW, Silverberg MJ, Gill J, Thorne JE, Klein M, Eron JJ, Kitahata MM, Sterling TR, Moore RD, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD)
(2016) AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 32: 50-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Body Mass Index, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Canada, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nutrition Surveys, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, United States, Weight Gain
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
The proportion of overweight and obese adults in the United States and Canada has increased over the past decade, but temporal trends in body mass index (BMI) and weight gain on antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected adults have not been well characterized. We conducted a cohort study comparing HIV-infected adults in the North America AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) to United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) controls matched by sex, race, and age over the period 1998 to 2010. Multivariable linear regression assessed the relationship between BMI and year of ART initiation, adjusting for sex, race, age, and baseline CD4(+) count. Temporal trends in weight on ART were assessed using a generalized least-squares model further adjusted for HIV-1 RNA and first ART regimen class. A total of 14,084 patients from 17 cohorts contributed data; 83% were male, 57% were nonwhite, and the median age was 40 years. Median BMI at ART initiation increased from 23.8 to 24.8 kg/m(2) between 1998 and 2010 in NA-ACCORD, but the percentage of those obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) at ART initiation increased from 9% to 18%. After 3 years of ART, 22% of individuals with a normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) at baseline had become overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), and 18% of those overweight at baseline had become obese. HIV-infected white women had a higher BMI after 3 years of ART as compared to age-matched white women in NHANES (p = 0.02), while no difference in BMI after 3 years of ART was observed for HIV-infected men or non-white women compared to controls. The high prevalence of obesity we observed among ART-exposed HIV-infected adults in North America may contribute to health complications in the future.
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21 MeSH Terms
Impact of risk factors for specific causes of death in the first and subsequent years of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected patients.
Ingle SM, May MT, Gill MJ, Mugavero MJ, Lewden C, Abgrall S, Fätkenheuer G, Reiss P, Saag MS, Manzardo C, Grabar S, Bruyand M, Moore D, Mocroft A, Sterling TR, D'Arminio Monforte A, Hernando V, Teira R, Guest J, Cavassini M, Crane HM, Sterne JA, Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration
(2014) Clin Infect Dis 59: 287-97
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Europe, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, North America, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
BACKGROUND - Patterns of cause-specific mortality in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are changing dramatically in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART).
METHODS - Sixteen cohorts from Europe and North America contributed data on adult patients followed from the start of ART. Procedures for coding causes of death were standardized. Estimated hazard ratios (HRs) were adjusted for transmission risk group, sex, age, year of ART initiation, baseline CD4 count, viral load, and AIDS status, before and after the first year of ART.
RESULTS - A total of 4237 of 65 121 (6.5%) patients died (median, 4.5 years follow-up). Rates of AIDS death decreased substantially with time since starting ART, but mortality from non-AIDS malignancy increased (rate ratio, 1.04 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.1). Higher mortality in men than women during the first year of ART was mostly due to non-AIDS malignancy and liver-related deaths. Associations with age were strongest for cardiovascular disease, heart/vascular, and malignancy deaths. Patients with presumed transmission through injection drug use had higher rates of all causes of death, particularly for liver-related causes (HRs compared with men who have sex with men: 18.1 [95% CI, 6.2-52.7] during the first year of ART and 9.1 [95% CI, 5.8-14.2] thereafter). There was a persistent role of CD4 count at baseline and at 12 months in predicting AIDS, non-AIDS infection, and non-AIDS malignancy deaths. Lack of viral suppression on ART was associated with AIDS, non-AIDS infection, and other causes of death.
CONCLUSIONS - Better understanding of patterns of and risk factors for cause-specific mortality in the ART era can aid in development of appropriate care for HIV-infected individuals and inform guidelines for risk factor management.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
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Genomewide association study of atazanavir pharmacokinetics and hyperbilirubinemia in AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202.
Johnson DH, Venuto C, Ritchie MD, Morse GD, Daar ES, McLaren PJ, Haas DW
(2014) Pharmacogenet Genomics 24: 195-203
MeSH Terms: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Adult, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Atazanavir Sulfate, Bilirubin, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Glucuronosyltransferase, HIV Protease Inhibitors, Humans, Hyperbilirubinemia, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Oligopeptides, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Pyridines, Ritonavir
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2015
BACKGROUND - Atazanavir-associated hyperbilirubinemia can cause premature discontinuation of atazanavir and avoidance of its initial prescription. We used genomewide genotyping and clinical data to characterize determinants of atazanavir pharmacokinetics and hyperbilirubinemia in AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202.
METHODS - Plasma atazanavir pharmacokinetics and indirect bilirubin concentrations were characterized in HIV-1-infected patients randomized to atazanavir/ritonavir-containing regimens. A subset had genomewide genotype data available.
RESULTS - Genomewide assay data were available from 542 participants, of whom 475 also had data on estimated atazanavir clearance and relevant covariates available. Peak bilirubin concentration and relevant covariates were available for 443 participants. By multivariate analysis, higher peak on-treatment bilirubin levels were found to be associated with the UGT1A1 rs887829 T allele (P=6.4×10(-12)), higher baseline hemoglobin levels (P=4.9×10(-13)), higher baseline bilirubin levels (P=6.7×10(-12)), and slower plasma atazanavir clearance (P=8.6×10(-11)). For peak bilirubin levels greater than 3.0 mg/dl, the positive predictive value of a baseline bilirubin level of 0.5 mg/dl or higher with hemoglobin concentrations of 14 g/dl or higher was 0.51, which increased to 0.85 with rs887829 TT homozygosity. For peak bilirubin levels of 3.0 mg/dl or lower, the positive predictive value of a baseline bilirubin level less than 0.5 mg/dl with a hemoglobin concentration less than 14 g/dl was 0.91, which increased to 0.96 with rs887829 CC homozygosity. No polymorphism predicted atazanavir pharmacokinetics at genomewide significance.
CONCLUSION - Atazanavir-associated hyperbilirubinemia is best predicted by considering UGT1A1 genotype, baseline bilirubin level, and baseline hemoglobin level in combination. Use of ritonavir as a pharmacokinetic enhancer may have abrogated genetic associations with atazanavir pharmacokinetics.
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Sex differences in HIV outcomes in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era: a systematic review.
Castilho JL, Melekhin VV, Sterling TR
(2014) AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 30: 446-56
MeSH Terms: Anti-Retroviral Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Disease Progression, Global Health, HIV Infections, Humans, Sex Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
To assess sex disparities in AIDS clinical and laboratory outcomes in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on mortality, disease progression, and laboratory outcomes among persons living with HIV and starting HAART. We performed systematic PubMed and targeted bibliographic searches of observational studies published between January, 1998, and November, 2013, that included persons starting HAART and reported analyses of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Risk ratios (relative risks, odd ratios, and hazard ratios) and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Sixty-five articles were included in this review. Thirty-nine studies were from North America and Europe and 26 were from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Forty-four studies (68%) showed no statistically significant difference in risk of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Decreased risk of death among females compared to males was observed in 24 of the 25 articles that included mortality analyses [pooled risk ratio 0.72 (95% confidence interval=0.69-0.75)], and decreased risk of death or AIDS was observed in 9 of the 13 articles that examined the composite outcome [pooled risk ratio=0.91 (0.84-0.98)]. There was no significant effect of sex on the risk of progression to AIDS [pooled risk ratio=1.15 (0.99-1.31)]. In this systematic review, females starting HAART appeared to have improved survival compared to males. However, this benefit was not associated with decreased progression to either AIDS or to differences in virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes.
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8 MeSH Terms
The other genome: a systematic review of studies of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and outcomes of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.
Hart AB, Samuels DC, Hulgan T
(2013) AIDS Rev 15: 213-20
MeSH Terms: Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, DNA, Mitochondrial, Genome, Viral, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Haplotypes, Humans, Phylogeny, Polymorphism, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added December 12, 2013
Mitochondrial toxicity is implicated in some treatment-limiting antiretroviral therapy complications, and reports of mitochondrial dysfunction in untreated HIV infection suggest antiretroviral therapy independent effects of HIV. Several studies have explored associations between mtDNA haplogroups (patterns of mtDNA polymorphisms) and outcomes of HIV infection and/or antiretroviral therapy, but findings have been inconsistent. We systematically reviewed published studies examining mtDNA haplogroups in HIV-infected persons to summarize reported outcome associations, and to highlight potential future research directions. We identified 21 articles published from 2005-2013. Multiple different phenotypes were studied; most were antiretroviral therapy associated metabolic outcomes (e.g. lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia). Haplogroup H was associated with the most outcomes, including AIDS progression, CD4 T-cell recovery, cirrhosis (in hepatitis C coinfection), and metabolic outcomes. This review is the first to focus on the emerging area of mtDNA haplogroups in HIV, and summarizes the published literature on associations between mtDNA haplogroups and clinical outcomes in populations of European and African descent. Several reported associations require replication and ideally biological verification before definitive conclusions can be drawn, but research in this area has the potential to explain outcome disparities and impact clinical management of patients.
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10 MeSH Terms
Mitochondrial DNA variation and changes in adiponectin and endothelial function in HIV-infected adults after antiretroviral therapy initiation.
Hulgan T, Stein JH, Cotter BR, Murdock DG, Ritchie MD, Dube MP, Gerschenson M, Haas DW, Torriani FJ, Aids Clinical Trials Group A5152s And Dacs 252 Study Teams
(2013) AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 29: 1293-9
MeSH Terms: Adiponectin, Adult, Anti-Retroviral Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, DNA, Mitochondrial, Dilatation, Pathologic, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2015
Studies in persons of European descent have suggested that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups influence antiretroviral therapy (ART) toxicity. We explored associations between mtDNA variants and changes in endothelial function and biomarkers among non-Hispanic white, ART-naive subjects starting ART. A5152s was a substudy of A5142, a randomized trial of initial class-sparing ART regimens that included efavirenz or lopinavir/ritonavir with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), or both without NRTIs. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiovascular biomarker assessments were performed at baseline and at weeks 4 and 24. Ten haplogroup-defining mtDNA polymorphisms were determined. FMD and biomarker changes from baseline to week 24 by mtDNA variant were assessed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Thirty-nine non-Hispanic white participants had DNA and 24-week data. The nonsynonymous m.10398A>G mtDNA polymorphism (N=8) was associated with higher median baseline adiponectin (5.0 vs. 4.2 μg/ml; p=0.003), greater absolute (-1.9 vs. -0.2 μg/ml) and relative (-33% vs. -3%) adiponectin decreases (p<0.001 for both), and lower week 24 brachial artery FMD (3.6% vs. 5.4%; p=0.04). Individual mtDNA haplogroups, including haplogroups H (N=13) and U (N=6), were not associated with adiponectin or FMD changes. In this small pilot study, adiponectin and brachial artery FMD on ART differed in non-Hispanic whites with a nonsynonymous mtDNA variant associated with several human diseases. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that mtDNA variation influences metabolic ART effects. Validation studies in larger populations and in different racial/ethnic groups that include m.10398G carriers are needed.
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Higher rates of AIDS during the first year of antiretroviral therapy among migrants: the importance of tuberculosis.
Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC), Shepherd BE, Jenkins CA, Parrish DD, Glass TR, Cescon A, Masabeu A, Chene G, de Wolf F, Crane HM, Jarrin I, Gill J, del Amo J, Abgrall S, Khaykin P, Lehmann C, Ingle SM, May MT, Sterne JA, Sterling TR
(2013) AIDS 27: 1321-9
MeSH Terms: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Cohort Studies, Developed Countries, Developing Countries, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Survival Rate, Time Factors, Transients and Migrants, Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
OBJECTIVE - In lower-income countries rates of AIDS-defining events (ADEs) and death are high during the first year of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). We investigated differences between foreign-born (migrant) and native-born (nonmigrant) patients initiating ART in Europe, the US and Canada, and examined rates of the most common ADEs and mortality during the first year of ART.
DESIGN - Observational cohort study.
METHODS - We studied HIV-positive adults participating in one of 12 cohorts in the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).
RESULTS - Of 48 854 patients, 25.6% were migrants: 16.1% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.6% Latin America, 2.3% North Africa/Middle East, and 1.6% Asia. Incidence of ADEs during the first year of ART was 60.8 per 1000 person-years: 69.9 for migrants and 57.7 for nonmigrants [crude hazard ratio (HR) 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.29], adjusted HR (for sex, age, CD4, HIV-1 RNA, ART regimen, prior ADE, probable route of infection and year of initiation, and stratified by cohort) 1.21 (95% CI 1.09-1.34). Rates of tuberculosis were substantially higher in migrants than nonmigrants (14.3 vs. 6.3; adjusted HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.53-2.46). In contrast, mortality was higher among nonmigrants than migrants (crude HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.61-0.84), although excess mortality was partially explained by patient characteristics at start of ART (adjusted HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.76-1.09).
CONCLUSIONS - During the first year of ART, HIV-positive migrants had higher rates of ADEs than nonmigrants. Tuberculosis was the most common ADE among migrants, highlighting the importance of screening for tuberculosis prior to ART initiation in this population.
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15 MeSH Terms
Durability of first ART regimen and risk factors for modification, interruption or death in HIV-positive patients starting ART in Europe and North America 2002-2009.
Abgrall S, Ingle SM, May MT, Costagliola D, Mercie P, Cavassini M, Reekie J, Samji H, Gill MJ, Crane HM, Tate J, Sterling TR, Antinori A, Reiss P, Saag MS, Mugavero MJ, Phillips A, Manzardo C, Wasmuth JC, Stephan C, Guest JL, Gomez Sirvent JL, Sterne JA, Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)
(2013) AIDS 27: 803-13
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Benzoxazines, Cohort Studies, Deoxycytidine, Dideoxynucleosides, Drug Combinations, Emtricitabine, Europe, HIV Infections, HIV Protease Inhibitors, HIV Seropositivity, HIV-1, Humans, Lamivudine, Lopinavir, Nevirapine, Organophosphonates, Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors, Risk Factors, Tenofovir, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
OBJECTIVES - To estimate the incidence of and risk factors for modifications to first antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen, treatment interruption and death.
METHODS - A total of 21 801 patients from 18 cohorts in Europe and North America starting ART on regimens including at least two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and boosted protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor during 2002-2009 were included. Incidence of modifications (change of drug class, substitution/addition within class, or switch to nonstandard regimen), interruption or death and associations with patient characteristics were estimated using competing-risks methods.
RESULTS - During median 28 months follow-up, 8786 (40.3%) patients modified first ART, 2346 (10.8%) interrupted and 427 (2.0%) died before changing regimen. Three-year cumulative percentages of modification, interruption and death were 47, 12 and 2%, respectively. After adjustment, rates of interruption were highest for IDUs and lowest for MSM, and higher for patients starting ART with CD4 cell count above 350 cells/μl than other patients. Compared to efavirenz, patients on lopinavir and other protease inhibitors had higher rates of modification and interruption, on atazanavir had lower rates of class change, and on nevirapine higher rates of interruption. Those on tenofovir/emtricitabine backbone had lowest rates of substitutions and switches to nonstandard regimen, and on abacavir/lamivudine lowest rates of interruption. Rates of substitution and switches to nonstandard regimen were lower in 2006-2009.
CONCLUSION - Rates of modification and interruption were high, particularly in the first year of ART. Decreased rates of substitutions or switches to nonstandard regimen in recent years may be linked to greater use of well tolerated once-daily drugs.
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24 MeSH Terms