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N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, does not improve bone mechanical properties in a rat model of progressive chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.
Allen MR, Wallace J, McNerney E, Nyman J, Avin K, Chen N, Moe S
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0230379
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Antioxidants, Caseins, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Oxidative Stress, Parathyroid Hormone, Rats, Tibia, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Individuals with chronic kidney disease have elevated levels of oxidative stress and are at a significantly higher risk of skeletal fracture. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in bone and compromise mechanical properties, are known to be driven in part by oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to study effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reducing oxidative stress and improving various bone parameters, most specifically mechanical properties, in an animal model of progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ (CKD) rats and unaffected littermates were untreated (controls) or treated with NAC (80 mg/kg, IP) from 30 to 35 weeks of age. Endpoint measures included serum biochemistries, assessments of systemic oxidative stress, bone morphology, and mechanical properties, and AGE levels in the bone. CKD rats had the expected phenotype that included low kidney function, elevated parathyroid hormone, higher cortical porosity, and compromised mechanical properties. NAC treatment had mixed effects on oxidative stress markers, significantly reducing TBARS (a measure of lipid peroxidation) while not affecting 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA oxidation) levels. AGE levels in the bone were elevated in CKD animals and were reduced with NAC although this did not translate to a benefit in bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, NAC failed to significantly improve bone architecture/geometry/mechanical properties in our rat model of progressive CKD.
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Activation of Nrf2 attenuates delayed gastric emptying in obesity induced diabetic (T2DM) female mice.
Sampath C, Sprouse JC, Freeman ML, Gangula PR
(2019) Free Radic Biol Med 135: 132-143
MeSH Terms: Acrolein, Animals, Antioxidants, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Gastric Emptying, Gastroparesis, Humans, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mice, Muscle Relaxation, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I, Obesity, Stomach, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Diabetic gastroparesis (GP) is a clinical syndrome characterized by delayed gastric emptying (DGE). Loss of Nrf2 (Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2) led to reduced nNOSα mediated gastric motility and DGE. The molecular signaling of cinnamaldehyde (CNM) mediated Nrf2 activation and its mechanistic role on DGE were further investigated in obese/T2D female mice. Adult female homozygous Nfe2l2 (C57BL/6J) and their wild-type (WT) littermates (Nfe2l2) mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD; Obese/T2D model), or normal diet (ND) with or without CNM (50 mg/kg b.w; i.p). Supplementation of CNM attenuated (p < 0.05) DGE in WT female but not in Nrf2 KO Obese/T2D mice. CNM (1) normalized serum estradiol-17β levels, (2) induced gastric Nrf2 and phase II antioxidant enzymes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase, (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), (3) reduced glucose synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and this was associated with (4) increased estrogen receptor expression, BH (Cofactor of nNOS) biosynthesis enzyme GCH-1 and nNOSα dimerization in WT Obese/T2 diabetic female mice. In addition, CNM restored impaired nitrergic relaxation in hyperglycemic conditions. These findings emphasize the importance of Nrf2 in maintaining nNOSα mediated GE and may have a translational relevance to treat obese/diabetic gastroparesis in women.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Antioxidants prevent inflammation and preserve the optic projection and visual function in experimental neurotrauma.
Bernardo-Colón A, Vest V, Clark A, Cooper ML, Calkins DJ, Harrison FE, Rex TS
(2018) Cell Death Dis 9: 1097
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Axons, Diet, Ketogenic, Disease Models, Animal, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Inflammasomes, Inflammation, Interleukin-1alpha, Interleukin-1beta, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Optic Nerve Injuries, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Retina, Superoxides, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
We investigated the role of oxidative stress and the inflammasome in trauma-induced axon degeneration and vision loss using a mouse model. The left eyes of male mice were exposed to over-pressure air waves. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice were fed normal, high-vitamin-E (VitE), ketogenic or ketogenic-control diets. Mice lacking the ability to produce vitamin C (VitC) were maintained on a low-VitC diet. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and retinal superoxide levels were measured in vivo. Tissue was collected for biochemical and histological analysis. Injury increased retinal superoxide, decreased SOD2, and increased cleaved caspase-1, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 levels. Low-VitC exacerbated the changes and the high-VitE diet mitigated them, suggesting that oxidative stress led to the increase in IL-1α and activation of the inflammasome. The injury caused loss of nearly 50% of optic nerve axons at 2 weeks and astrocyte hypertrophy in mice on normal diet, both of which were prevented by the high-VitE diet. The VEP amplitude was decreased after injury in both control-diet and low-VitC mice, but not in the high-VitE-diet mice. The ketogenic diet also prevented the increase in superoxide levels and IL-1α, but had no effect on IL-1β. Despite this, the ketogenic diet preserved optic nerve axons, prevented astrocyte hypertrophy, and preserved the VEP amplitude. These data suggest that oxidative stress induces priming and activation of the inflammasome pathway after neurotrauma of the visual system. Further, blocking the activation of the inflammasome pathway may be an effective post-injury intervention.
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Association Between Early Postoperative Acetaminophen Exposure and Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.
Van Driest SL, Jooste EH, Shi Y, Choi L, Darghosian L, Hill KD, Smith AH, Kannankeril PJ, Roden DM, Ware LB
(2018) JAMA Pediatr 172: 655-663
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Acute Kidney Injury, Antioxidants, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Child, Preschool, Creatinine, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Postoperative Care, Postoperative Complications, Postoperative Period, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Importance - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious complication for pediatric cardiac surgery patients associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and length of stay. Current strategies focus on risk reduction and early identification because there are no known preventive or therapeutic agents. Cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass lyse erythrocytes, releasing free hemoglobin and contributing to oxidative injury. Acetaminophen may prevent AKI by reducing the oxidation state of free hemoglobin.
Objective - To test the hypothesis that early postoperative acetaminophen exposure is associated with reduced risk of AKI in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery.
Design, Setting, and Participants - In this retrospective cohort study, the setting was 2 tertiary referral children's hospitals. The primary and validation cohorts included children older than 28 days admitted for cardiac surgery between July 1, 2008, and June 1, 2016. Exclusion criteria were postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and inadequate serum creatinine measurements to determine AKI status.
Exposures - Acetaminophen exposure in the first 48 postoperative hours.
Main Outcomes and Measures - Acute kidney injury based on Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes serum creatinine criteria (increase by ≥0.3 mg/dL from baseline or at least 1.5-fold more than the baseline [to convert to micromoles per liter, multiply by 88.4]) in the first postoperative week.
Results - The primary cohort (n = 666) had a median age of 6.5 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.9-44.7) months, and 341 (51.2%) had AKI. In unadjusted analyses, those with AKI had lower median acetaminophen doses than those without AKI (47 [IQR, 16-88] vs 78 [IQR, 43-104] mg/kg, P < .001). In logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, cardiopulmonary bypass time, red blood cell distribution width, postoperative hypotension, nephrotoxin exposure, and Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, acetaminophen exposure was protective against postoperative AKI (odds ratio, 0.86 [95% CI, 0.82-0.90] per each additional 10 mg/kg). Findings were replicated in the validation cohort (n = 333), who had a median age of 14.1 (IQR, 3.9-158.2) months, and 162 (48.6%) had AKI. Acetaminophen doses were 60 (95% CI, 40-87) mg/kg in those with AKI vs 70 (95% CI, 45-94) mg/kg in those without AKI (P = .03), with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.84-0.99) for each additional 10 mg/kg.
Conclusions and Relevance - These results indicate that early postoperative acetaminophen exposure may be associated with a lower rate of AKI in pediatric patients who undergo cardiac surgery. Further analysis to validate these findings, potentially through a prospective, randomized trial, may establish acetaminophen as a preventive agent for AKI.
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Antioxidant supplementation and atrial arrhythmias in critically ill trauma patients.
Mirhoseini MF, Hamblin SE, Moore WP, Pouliot J, Jenkins JM, Wang W, Chandrasekhar R, Collier BR, Patel MB
(2018) J Surg Res 222: 10-16
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antioxidants, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Ascorbic Acid, Critical Care, Critical Illness, Dietary Supplements, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Retrospective Studies, Selenium, Trauma Centers, Vitamin D, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - The purpose of this study is to determine if antioxidant supplementation influences the incidence of atrial arrhythmias in trauma intensive care unit (ICU) patients.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - In this retrospective pre-post study, critically ill injured patients aged ≥18 years, admitted to a single-center trauma ICU for ≥48 hours were eligible for inclusion. The control group consists of patients admitted from January 2000 to September 2005, before routine antioxidant supplementation in our ICU. The antioxidant group consists of patients admitted from October 2005 to June 2011 who received an antioxidant protocol for ≥48 hours. The primary outcome is the incidence of atrial arrhythmias in the first 2 weeks of hospitalization or before discharge.
RESULTS - Of the 4699 patients, 1622 patients were in the antioxidant group and 2414 patients were in the control group. Adjusted for age, sex, year, injury severity, past medical history, and medication administration, the unadjusted incidence of atrial arrhythmias was 3.02% in the antioxidant group versus 3.31% in the control group, with no adjusted difference in atrial arrhythmias among those exposed to antioxidants (odds ratio: 1.31 [95% confidence interval: 0.46, 3.75], P = 0.62). Although there was no change in overall mortality, the expected adjusted survival of patients in those without antioxidant therapy was lower (odds ratio: 0.65 [95% confidence interval: 0.43, 0.97], P = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS - ICU antioxidant supplementation did not decrease the incidence of atrial arrhythmias, nor alter the time from admission to development of arrhythmia. A longer expected survival time was observed in the antioxidant group compared with the control group but without a change in overall mortality between groups.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Ascorbic acid attenuates endothelial permeability triggered by cell-free hemoglobin.
Kuck JL, Bastarache JA, Shaver CM, Fessel JP, Dikalov SI, May JM, Ware LB
(2018) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 495: 433-437
MeSH Terms: Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Capillary Permeability, Endothelium, Vascular, Hemoglobins, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Increased endothelial permeability is central to shock and organ dysfunction in sepsis but therapeutics targeted to known mediators of increased endothelial permeability have been unsuccessful in patient studies. We previously reported that cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) is elevated in the majority of patients with sepsis and is associated with organ dysfunction, poor clinical outcomes and elevated markers of oxidant injury. Others have shown that Vitamin C (ascorbate) may have endothelial protective effects in sepsis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of CFH, as seen in the circulation of patients with sepsis, disrupt endothelial barrier integrity.
METHODS - Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown to confluence and treated with CFH with or without ascorbate. Monolayer permeability was measured by Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) or transfer of C-inulin. Viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion. Intracellular ascorbate was measured by HPLC.
RESULTS - CFH increased permeability in a dose- and time-dependent manner with 1 mg/ml of CFH increasing inulin transfer by 50% without affecting cell viability. CFH (1 mg/ml) also caused a dramatic reduction in intracellular ascorbate in the same time frame (1.4 mM without CFH, 0.23 mM 18 h after 1 mg/ml CFH, p < 0.05). Pre-treatment of HUVECs with ascorbate attenuated CFH induced permeability.
CONCLUSIONS - CFH increases endothelial permeability in part through depletion of intracellular ascorbate. Supplementation of ascorbate can attenuate increases in permeability mediated by CFH suggesting a possible therapeutic approach in sepsis.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Cellular accumulation and antioxidant activity of acetoxymethoxycarbonyl pyrrolidine nitroxides.
Dikalov SI, Dikalova AE, Morozov DA, Kirilyuk IA
(2018) Free Radic Res 52: 339-350
MeSH Terms: Antioxidants, Cyclic N-Oxides, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Mitochondria, Nitrogen Oxides
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Nitroxides are widely used in biology as antioxidants, spin labels, functional spin probes for pH, oxygen and thiol levels, and tissue redox status imaging using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); however, biological applications of nitroxides is hindered by fast bioreduction to EPR-silent hydroxylamines and rapid clearance. In this work, we have studied pyrrolidine nitroxides with acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups which can undergo hydrolysis by cellular esterases to hydrophilic carboxylate derivatives resistant to bioreduction. Nitroxides containing acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups were rapidly absorbed by cells from the media, 3,4-bis-(acetoxymethoxycarbonyl)-proxyl (DCP-AM2) and 3-(2-(bis(2-(acetoxymethoxy)-2-oxoethyl)amino)acetamido)-proxyl (DCAP-AM2) showing the strongest EPR signal of the cellular fraction. Remarkably, the EPR parameters of 3,4-dicarboxy-proxyl (DCP) and its mono- and di-acetoxymethyl esters are different, and consequent intracellular hydrolysis of acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups in DCP-AM2 can be followed by EPR. To elucidate intracellular location of the resultant DCP, the mitochondrial fraction has been isolated. EPR measurements showed that mitochondria were the main place where DCP was finally accumulated. TEMPO derivatives showed expectedly much faster decay of EPR signal in the cellular fraction, compared to pyrrolidine nitroxides. It was found that supplementation of endothelial cells with 50 nM of DCP-AM2 completely normalised the mitochondrial superoxide level. Moreover, administration of DCP-AM2 to mice (1.4 mg/kg/day) resulted in substantial nitroxide accumulation in the tissues and significantly reduced hypertension. We found that hydroxylamine derivatives of dicarboxyproxyl nitroxide DCP-AM-H can be used for the detection of superoxide in vivo in angiotensin II model of hypertension. Infusion of DCP-AM-H in mice leads to accumulation of persistent EPR signal of nitroxide in the blood and vascular tissue in angiotensin II-infused wild-type but not in SOD2 overexpressing mice. Our data demonstrate that acetoxymethoxycarbonyl group containing nitroxides accumulate in mitochondria and demonstrate site-specific antioxidant activity.
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Selenoproteins in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression.
Short SP, Williams CS
(2017) Adv Cancer Res 136: 49-83
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Carcinogenesis, Disease Progression, Humans, Neoplasms, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Selenium, Selenoproteins
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Selenium is a micronutrient essential to human health and has long been associated with cancer prevention. Functionally, these effects are thought to be mediated by a class of selenium-containing proteins known as selenoproteins. Indeed, many selenoproteins have antioxidant activity which can attenuate cancer development by minimizing oxidative insult and resultant DNA damage. However, oxidative stress is increasingly being recognized for its "double-edged sword" effect in tumorigenesis, whereby it can mediate both negative and positive effects on tumor growth depending on the cellular context. In addition to their roles in redox homeostasis, recent work has also implicated selenoproteins in key oncogenic and tumor-suppressive pathways. Together, these data suggest that the overall contribution of selenoproteins to tumorigenesis is complicated and may be affected by a variety of factors. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about selenoproteins in tumorigenesis with a focus on their contextual roles in cancer development, growth, and progression.
© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mitochondrial dysfunction in the APP/PSEN1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and a novel protective role for ascorbate.
Dixit S, Fessel JP, Harrison FE
(2017) Free Radic Biol Med 112: 515-523
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Diphosphate, Adenosine Triphosphate, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Animals, Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Biological Transport, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Heterozygote, Humans, Male, Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mitochondria, Mutation, Oxidative Stress, Oxygen Consumption, Presenilin-1, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, Sodium-Coupled Vitamin C Transporters
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Mitochondrial dysfunction is elevated in very early stages of Alzheimer's disease and exacerbates oxidative stress, which contributes to disease pathology. Mitochondria were isolated from 4-month-old wild-type mice, transgenic mice carrying the APP and PSEN1 mutations, mice with decreased brain and mitochondrial ascorbate (vitamin C) via heterozygous knockout of the sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) and transgenic APP/PSEN1 mice with heterozygous SVCT2 expression. Mitochondrial isolates from SVCT2 mice were observed to consume less oxygen using high-resolution respirometry, and also exhibited decreased mitochondrial membrane potential compared to wild type isolates. Conversely, isolates from young (4 months) APP/PSEN1 mice consumed more oxygen, and exhibited an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, but had a significantly lower ATP/ADP ratio compared to wild type isolates. Greater levels of reactive oxygen species were also produced in mitochondria isolated from both APP/PSEN1 and SVCT2 mice compared to wild type isolates. Acute administration of ascorbate to mitochondria isolated from wild-type mice increased oxygen consumption compared with untreated mitochondria suggesting ascorbate may support energy production. This study suggests that both presence of amyloid and ascorbate deficiency can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, even at an early, prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease, although occurring via different pathways. Ascorbate may, therefore, provide a useful preventative strategy against neurodegenerative disease, particularly in populations most at risk for Alzheimer's disease in which stores are often depleted through mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated oxidative stress.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Inflammation-dependent cerebrospinal fluid hypersecretion by the choroid plexus epithelium in posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus.
Karimy JK, Zhang J, Kurland DB, Theriault BC, Duran D, Stokum JA, Furey CG, Zhou X, Mansuri MS, Montejo J, Vera A, DiLuna ML, Delpire E, Alper SL, Gunel M, Gerzanich V, Medzhitov R, Simard JM, Kahle KT
(2017) Nat Med 23: 997-1003
MeSH Terms: Acetazolamide, Animals, Antioxidants, Blotting, Western, Bumetanide, Cerebral Hemorrhage, Cerebral Ventricles, Cerebrospinal Fluid, Choroid Plexus, Diuretics, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Gene Knockout Techniques, Hydrocephalus, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, Immunoprecipitation, Inflammation, NF-kappa B, Proline, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Salicylanilides, Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 2, Sulfonamides, Thiocarbamates, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) secretes higher volumes of fluid (cerebrospinal fluid, CSF) than any other epithelium and simultaneously functions as the blood-CSF barrier to gate immune cell entry into the central nervous system. Posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH), an expansion of the cerebral ventricles due to CSF accumulation following intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), is a common disease usually treated by suboptimal CSF shunting techniques. PHH is classically attributed to primary impairments in CSF reabsorption, but little experimental evidence supports this concept. In contrast, the potential contribution of CSF secretion to PHH has received little attention. In a rat model of PHH, we demonstrate that IVH causes a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and NF-κB-dependent inflammatory response in the CPE that is associated with a ∼3-fold increase in bumetanide-sensitive CSF secretion. IVH-induced hypersecretion of CSF is mediated by TLR4-dependent activation of the Ste20-type stress kinase SPAK, which binds, phosphorylates, and stimulates the NKCC1 co-transporter at the CPE apical membrane. Genetic depletion of TLR4 or SPAK normalizes hyperactive CSF secretion rates and reduces PHH symptoms, as does treatment with drugs that antagonize TLR4-NF-κB signaling or the SPAK-NKCC1 co-transporter complex. These data uncover a previously unrecognized contribution of CSF hypersecretion to the pathogenesis of PHH, demonstrate a new role for TLRs in regulation of the internal brain milieu, and identify a kinase-regulated mechanism of CSF secretion that could be targeted by repurposed US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs to treat hydrocephalus.
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