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Early Detection of Treatment-Induced Mitotic Arrest Using Temporal Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.
Jiang X, Li H, Zhao P, Xie J, Khabele D, Xu J, Gore JC
(2016) Neoplasia 18: 387-97
MeSH Terms: Albumins, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Apoptosis, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Size, Female, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mice, Mice, Nude, Mitosis, Mitotic Index, Paclitaxel, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2016
PURPOSE - A novel quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, namely, temporal diffusion spectroscopy (TDS), was used to detect the response of tumor cells (notably, mitotic arrest) to a specific antimitotic treatment (Nab-paclitaxel) in culture and human ovarian xenografts and evaluated as an early imaging biomarker of tumor responsiveness.
METHODS - TDS measures a series of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of tissue water over a range of effective diffusion times, which may correspond to diffusion distances ranging from subcellular to cellular levels (~3-20 μm). By fitting the measured ADC data to a tissue model, parameters reflecting structural properties such as restriction size in solid tumors can be extracted. Two types of human ovarian cell lines (OVCAR-8 as a responder to Nab-paclitaxel and NCI/ADR-RES as a resistant type) were treated with either vehicle (PBS) or Nab-paclitaxel, and treatment responses of both in vitro and in vivo cases were investigated using TDS.
RESULTS - Acute cell size increases induced by Nab-paclitaxel in responding tumors were confirmed by flow cytometry and light microscopy in cell culture. Nab-paclitaxel-induced mitotic arrest in treated tumors/cells was quantified histologically by measuring the mitotic index in vivo using a mitosis-specific marker (anti-phosphohistone H3). Changes in the fitted restriction size, one of the parameters obtained from TDS, were able to detect and quantify increases in tumor cell sizes. All the MR results had a high degree of consistency with other flow, microscopy, and histological data. Moreover, with an appropriate analysis, the Nab-paclitaxel-responsive tumors in vivo could be easily distinguished from all the other vehicle-treated and Nab-paclitaxel-resistant tumors.
CONCLUSION - TDS detects increases in cell sizes associated with antimitotic-therapy-induced mitotic arrest in solid tumors in vivo which occur before changes in tissue cellularity or conventional diffusion MRI metrics. By quantifying changes in cell size, TDS has the potential to improve the specificity of MRI methods in the evaluation of therapeutic response and enable a mechanistic understanding of therapy-induced changes in tumors.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Designing a broad-spectrum integrative approach for cancer prevention and treatment.
Block KI, Gyllenhaal C, Lowe L, Amedei A, Amin ARMR, Amin A, Aquilano K, Arbiser J, Arreola A, Arzumanyan A, Ashraf SS, Azmi AS, Benencia F, Bhakta D, Bilsland A, Bishayee A, Blain SW, Block PB, Boosani CS, Carey TE, Carnero A, Carotenuto M, Casey SC, Chakrabarti M, Chaturvedi R, Chen GZ, Chen H, Chen S, Chen YC, Choi BK, Ciriolo MR, Coley HM, Collins AR, Connell M, Crawford S, Curran CS, Dabrosin C, Damia G, Dasgupta S, DeBerardinis RJ, Decker WK, Dhawan P, Diehl AME, Dong JT, Dou QP, Drew JE, Elkord E, El-Rayes B, Feitelson MA, Felsher DW, Ferguson LR, Fimognari C, Firestone GL, Frezza C, Fujii H, Fuster MM, Generali D, Georgakilas AG, Gieseler F, Gilbertson M, Green MF, Grue B, Guha G, Halicka D, Helferich WG, Heneberg P, Hentosh P, Hirschey MD, Hofseth LJ, Holcombe RF, Honoki K, Hsu HY, Huang GS, Jensen LD, Jiang WG, Jones LW, Karpowicz PA, Keith WN, Kerkar SP, Khan GN, Khatami M, Ko YH, Kucuk O, Kulathinal RJ, Kumar NB, Kwon BS, Le A, Lea MA, Lee HY, Lichtor T, Lin LT, Locasale JW, Lokeshwar BL, Longo VD, Lyssiotis CA, MacKenzie KL, Malhotra M, Marino M, Martinez-Chantar ML, Matheu A, Maxwell C, McDonnell E, Meeker AK, Mehrmohamadi M, Mehta K, Michelotti GA, Mohammad RM, Mohammed SI, Morre DJ, Muralidhar V, Muqbil I, Murphy MP, Nagaraju GP, Nahta R, Niccolai E, Nowsheen S, Panis C, Pantano F, Parslow VR, Pawelec G, Pedersen PL, Poore B, Poudyal D, Prakash S, Prince M, Raffaghello L, Rathmell JC, Rathmell WK, Ray SK, Reichrath J, Rezazadeh S, Ribatti D, Ricciardiello L, Robey RB, Rodier F, Rupasinghe HPV, Russo GL, Ryan EP, Samadi AK, Sanchez-Garcia I, Sanders AJ, Santini D, Sarkar M, Sasada T, Saxena NK, Shackelford RE, Shantha Kumara HMC, Sharma D, Shin DM, Sidransky D, Siegelin MD, Signori E, Singh N, Sivanand S, Sliva D, Smythe C, Spagnuolo C, Stafforini DM, Stagg J, Subbarayan PR, Sundin T, Talib WH, Thompson SK, Tran PT, Ungefroren H, Vander Heiden MG, Venkateswaran V, Vinay DS, Vlachostergios PJ, Wang Z, Wellen KE, Whelan RL, Yang ES, Yang H, Yang X, Yaswen P, Yedjou C, Yin X, Zhu J, Zollo M
(2015) Semin Cancer Biol 35 Suppl: S276-S304
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Genetic Heterogeneity, Humans, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neoplasms, Precision Medicine, Signal Transduction, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2016
Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broad-spectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested, many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment. Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to be relatively inexpensive, it should help us address stages and types of cancer that lack conventional treatment, and it may reduce relapse risks. A proposed agenda for future research is offered.
Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Lavoie Smith EM, Li L, Chiang C, Thomas K, Hutchinson RJ, Wells EM, Ho RH, Skiles J, Chakraborty A, Bridges CM, Renbarger J
(2015) J Peripher Nerv Syst 20: 37-46
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Pain Measurement, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Severity of Illness Index, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added November 10, 2016
Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1-18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children's hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©-Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ≥4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8-12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2-3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe.
© 2015 Peripheral Nerve Society.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.
Wang Z, Dabrosin C, Yin X, Fuster MM, Arreola A, Rathmell WK, Generali D, Nagaraju GP, El-Rayes B, Ribatti D, Chen YC, Honoki K, Fujii H, Georgakilas AG, Nowsheen S, Amedei A, Niccolai E, Amin A, Ashraf SS, Helferich B, Yang X, Guha G, Bhakta D, Ciriolo MR, Aquilano K, Chen S, Halicka D, Mohammed SI, Azmi AS, Bilsland A, Keith WN, Jensen LD
(2015) Semin Cancer Biol 35 Suppl: S224-S243
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Blood Vessels, Cell Proliferation, Humans, Immunotherapy, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
Deregulation of angiogenesis--the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature--is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the pathological tumor vasculature which would be well suited as targets for anti-angiogenic therapy: (1) endothelial cell migration/tip cell formation, (2) structural abnormalities of tumor vessels, (3) hypoxia, (4) lymphangiogenesis, (5) elevated interstitial fluid pressure, (6) poor perfusion, (7) disrupted circadian rhythms, (8) tumor promoting inflammation, (9) tumor promoting fibroblasts and (10) tumor cell metabolism/acidosis. Following this analysis, we scrutinized the available literature on broadly acting anti-angiogenic natural products, with a focus on finding qualitative information on phytochemicals which could inhibit these targets and came up with 10 prototypical phytochemical compounds: (1) oleanolic acid, (2) tripterine, (3) silibinin, (4) curcumin, (5) epigallocatechin-gallate, (6) kaempferol, (7) melatonin, (8) enterolactone, (9) withaferin A and (10) resveratrol. We suggest that these plant-derived compounds could be combined to constitute a broader acting and more effective inhibitory cocktail at doses that would not be likely to cause excessive toxicity. All the targets and phytochemical approaches were further cross-validated against their effects on other essential tumorigenic pathways (based on the "hallmarks" of cancer) in order to discover possible synergies or potentially harmful interactions, and were found to generally also have positive involvement in/effects on these other aspects of tumor biology. The aim is that this discussion could lead to the selection of combinations of such anti-angiogenic compounds which could be used in potent anti-tumor cocktails, for enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced toxicity and circumvention of single-agent anti-angiogenic resistance, as well as for possible use in primary or secondary cancer prevention strategies.
Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Population pharmacokinetics of PEGylated liposomal CPT-11 (IHL-305) in patients with advanced solid tumors.
Wu H, Infante JR, Keedy VL, Jones SF, Chan E, Bendell JC, Lee W, Zamboni BA, Ikeda S, Kodaira H, Rothenberg ML, Burris HA, Zamboni WC
(2013) Eur J Clin Pharmacol 69: 2073-81
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Camptothecin, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Irinotecan, Liposomes, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Biological, Neoplasms, Polyethylene Glycols
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
PURPOSE - To investigate pharmacokinetics (PK) of encapsulated CPT-11, released CPT-11 and the active metabolite SN-38 following administration of IHL-305 and to identify factors that may influence IHL-305 PK.
METHODS - Plasma samples from 39 patients with solid tumors were collected in a phase I study. IHL-305 was administered as a 1 h IV infusion with doses ranging from 3.5 to 210 mg/m(2). Plasma concentrations of encapsulated CPT-11, released CPT-11 and SN-38 were used to develop a population PK model using NONMEM®.
RESULTS - PK of encapsulated CPT-11 was described by 1-compartment model with nonlinear clearance and PK of released CPT-11 was described by a 1-compartment model with linear clearance for all patients. PK of the active metabolite SN-38 was described by a 2-compartment model with linear clearance for all patients. Covariate analysis revealed that gender was a significant covariate for volume of distribution of encapsulated CPT-11. Vencap in male patients is 1.5-fold higher compared with female patients.
CONCLUSIONS - The developed population PK modeling approach is useful to predict PK exposures of encapsulated and released drug and can be applied to the more than 300 other nanoparticle formulations of anticancer agents that are currently in development. The effect of gender on PK of IHL-305 needs to be further evaluated.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Measuring vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Lavoie Smith EM, Li L, Hutchinson RJ, Ho R, Burnette WB, Wells E, Bridges C, Renbarger J
(2013) Cancer Nurs 36: E49-60
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Child, Child, Preschool, Clinical Trials as Topic, Feasibility Studies, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Nursing Assessment, Pain Measurement, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Reproducibility of Results, Severity of Illness Index, Tissue Distribution, United States, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN) is difficult to quantify in children.
OBJECTIVE - The study objective was to examine the reliability, validity, and clinical feasibility of several VIPN measures for use in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
INTERVENTIONS/METHODS - Children (n = 65) aged 1 to 18 years receiving vincristine at 4 academic centers participated in the study. Baseline and pre-vincristine administration VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, the Balis grading scale, and the FACES Pain Scale. The TNS-PV scores (n = 806) were obtained over 15 weeks. Blood was obtained at several time points to quantify pharmacokinetic parameters.
RESULTS - Cronbach's α for a reduced TNS-PV scale was .84. The TNS-PV scores correlated with cumulative vincristine dosage (r = 0.53, P = 0.01), pharmacokinetic parameters (r = 0.41, P = 0.05), and grading scale scores (r range = 0.46-0.52, P = .01). FACES scores correlated with the TNS-PV neuropathic pain item (r = 0.48; P = .01) and were attainable in all ages. A 2-item V-Rex score (vibration and reflex items) was the most responsive to change (effect size = 0.65, P < 0.001). The TNS-PV scores were attainable in 95% of children 6 years or older.
CONCLUSIONS - The TNS-PV is reliable and valid for measuring VIPN. It is sensitive to change over time (15 weeks) and feasible for use in children 6 years or older.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE - The TNS-PV may be a useful tool for assessing vincristine toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
TGF-β inhibition enhances chemotherapy action against triple-negative breast cancer.
Bhola NE, Balko JM, Dugger TC, Kuba MG, Sánchez V, Sanders M, Stanford J, Cook RS, Arteaga CL
(2013) J Clin Invest 123: 1348-58
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Humans, Interleukin-8, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplastic Stem Cells, Paclitaxel, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Pyrazoles, Quinolines, RNA, Small Interfering, Receptor, ErbB-2, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Estrogen, Receptors, Progesterone, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Signal Transduction, Smad4 Protein, Spheroids, Cellular, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
After an initial response to chemotherapy, many patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have recurrence of drug-resistant metastatic disease. Studies with TNBC cells suggest that chemotherapy-resistant populations of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) with self-renewing and tumor-initiating capacities are responsible for these relapses. TGF-β has been shown to increase stem-like properties in human breast cancer cells. We analyzed RNA expression in matched pairs of primary breast cancer biopsies before and after chemotherapy. Biopsies after chemotherapy displayed increased RNA transcripts of genes associated with CSCs and TGF-β signaling. In TNBC cell lines and mouse xenografts, the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel increased autocrine TGF-β signaling and IL-8 expression and enriched for CSCs, as indicated by mammosphere formation and CSC markers. The TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY2157299, a neutralizing TGF-β type II receptor antibody, and SMAD4 siRNA all blocked paclitaxel-induced IL8 transcription and CSC expansion. Moreover, treatment of TNBC xenografts with LY2157299 prevented reestablishment of tumors after paclitaxel treatment. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced TGF-β signaling enhances tumor recurrence through IL-8-dependent expansion of CSCs and that TGF-β pathway inhibitors prevent the development of drug-resistant CSCs. These findings support testing a combination of TGF-β inhibitors and anticancer chemotherapy in patients with TNBC.
1 Communities
5 Members
0 Resources
28 MeSH Terms
Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data in identifying genes mediating sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs: statistical approaches and perspectives.
Ye F, Bauer JA, Pietenpol JA, Shyr Y
(2012) BMC Genomics 13 Suppl 8: S3
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Female, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Models, Statistical, Paclitaxel, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2013
BACKGROUND - High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screens have been used to find genes that, when silenced, result in sensitivity to certain chemotherapy drugs. Researchers therefore can further identify drug-sensitive targets and novel drug combinations that sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Considerable uncertainty exists about the efficiency and accuracy of statistical approaches used for RNAi hit selection in drug sensitivity studies. Researchers require statistical methods suitable for analyzing high-throughput RNAi screening data that will reduce false-positive and false-negative rates.
RESULTS - In this study, we carried out a simulation study to evaluate four types of statistical approaches (fold-change/ratio, parametric tests/statistics, sensitivity index, and linear models) with different scenarios of RNAi screenings for drug sensitivity studies. With the simulated datasets, the linear model resulted in significantly lower false-negative and false-positive rates. Based on the results of the simulation study, we then make recommendations of statistical analysis methods for high-throughput RNAi screening data in different scenarios. We assessed promising methods using real data from a loss-of-function RNAi screen to identify hits that modulate paclitaxel sensitivity in breast cancer cells. High-confidence hits with specific inhibitors were further analyzed for their ability to inhibit breast cancer cell growth. Our analysis identified a number of gene targets with inhibitors known to enhance paclitaxel sensitivity, suggesting other genes identified may merit further investigation.
CONCLUSIONS - RNAi screening can identify druggable targets and novel drug combinations that can sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. However, applying an inappropriate statistical method or model to the RNAi screening data will result in decreased power to detect the true hits and increase false positive and false negative rates, leading researchers to draw incorrect conclusions. In this paper, we make recommendations to enable more objective selection of statistical analysis methods for high-throughput RNAi screening data.
1 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Integration of cell line and clinical trial genome-wide analyses supports a polygenic architecture of Paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Wheeler HE, Gamazon ER, Wing C, Njiaju UO, Njoku C, Baldwin RM, Owzar K, Jiang C, Watson D, Shterev I, Kubo M, Zembutsu H, Winer EP, Hudis CA, Shulman LN, Nakamura Y, Ratain MJ, Kroetz DL, Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Cox NJ, Dolan ME
(2013) Clin Cancer Res 19: 491-9
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA-Binding Proteins, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Paclitaxel, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Regulatory Factor X Transcription Factors, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
PURPOSE - We sought to show the relevance of a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) model in the discovery of clinically relevant genetic variants affecting chemotherapeutic response by comparing LCL genome-wide association study (GWAS) results to clinical GWAS results.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - A GWAS of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity was conducted in 247 LCLs from the HapMap Project and compared with a GWAS of sensory peripheral neuropathy in patients with breast cancer (n = 855) treated with paclitaxel in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40101 trial. Significant enrichment was assessed by permutation resampling analysis.
RESULTS - We observed an enrichment of LCL cytotoxicity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the sensory peripheral neuropathy-associated SNPs from the clinical trial with concordant allelic directions of effect (empirical P = 0.007). Of the 24 SNPs that overlap between the clinical trial (P < 0.05) and the preclinical cytotoxicity study (P < 0.001), 19 of them are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), which is a significant enrichment of this functional class (empirical P = 0.0447). One of these eQTLs is located in RFX2, which encodes a member of the DNA-binding regulatory factor X family. Decreased expression of this gene by siRNA resulted in increased sensitivity of Neuroscreen-1(NS-1; rat pheochromocytoma) cells to paclitaxel as measured by reduced neurite outgrowth and increased cytotoxicity, functionally validating the involvement of RFX2 in nerve cell response to paclitaxel.
CONCLUSIONS - The enrichment results and functional example imply that cellular models of chemotherapeutic toxicity may capture components of the underlying polygenic architecture of related traits in patients.
©2012 AACR.
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13 MeSH Terms
Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of IHL-305 (PEGylated liposomal irinotecan) in patients with advanced solid tumors.
Infante JR, Keedy VL, Jones SF, Zamboni WC, Chan E, Bendell JC, Lee W, Wu H, Ikeda S, Kodaira H, Rothenberg ML, Burris HA
(2012) Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 70: 699-705
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Camptothecin, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Glucuronosyltransferase, Humans, Irinotecan, Liposomes, Male, Maximum Tolerated Dose, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Polyethylene Glycols, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
PURPOSE - IHL-305 is a novel PEGylated liposome containing irinotecan. This study examined the safety profile and pharmacokinetics of IHL-305 and established the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase II dose (RP2D).
PATIENTS AND METHODS - In a standard 3 + 3 design, IHL-305 was administered IV on day 1 of a 28-day treatment schedule. Subsequently, a 14-day treatment schedule was also explored. Two patient populations were evaluated separately: Patients with at least one wild-type (wt) allele of UGT1A1 (UDP glucoronosyltransferase 1A1) wt/wt or wt/*28 as one group (referred to as UGT1A1 wt group) and patients with UGT1A1*28 homozygous variant (*28/*28) as another group.
RESULTS - Sixty patients were treated: 42 on the 28-day schedule and 18 on the 14-day schedule. Seven patients were homozygous variant (*28/*28). In the UGT1A1 wt group, the MTD and RP2D of IHL-305 was 160 mg/m(2) every 28 days and 80 mg/m(2) every 14 days. DLTs included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and neutropenia. The most common adverse events were nausea (75 %), vomiting (52 %), diarrhea (62 %), anorexia (57 %), and fatigue (57 %). At the MTD for both schedules, IHL-305 administration resulted in a high and prolonged exposure of sum total irinotecan, released irinotecan, and SN-38 in plasma. One partial response was observed in a patient with breast cancer and eight patients had stable disease for >6 months.
CONCLUSIONS - IHL-305, a novel preparation of irinotecan encapsulated in liposomes, can be safely given to patients in a repeated fashion on a 4- or 2-week dosing schedule.
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16 MeSH Terms