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Bcl2-Expressing Quiescent Type B Neural Stem Cells in the Ventricular-Subventricular Zone Are Resistant to Concurrent Temozolomide/X-Irradiation.
Cameron BD, Traver G, Roland JT, Brockman AA, Dean D, Johnson L, Boyd K, Ihrie RA, Freeman ML
(2019) Stem Cells 37: 1629-1639
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Apoptosis, Chemoradiotherapy, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Resistance, Female, Glioblastoma, Lateral Ventricles, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Stem Cells, Neurogenesis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Temozolomide, X-Ray Therapy
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the mammalian brain is a site of adult neurogenesis. Within the V-SVZ reside type B neural stem cells (NSCs) and type A neuroblasts. The V-SVZ is also a primary site for very aggressive glioblastoma (GBM). Standard-of-care therapy for GBM consists of safe maximum resection, concurrent temozolomide (TMZ), and X-irradiation (XRT), followed by adjuvant TMZ therapy. The question of how this therapy impacts neurogenesis is not well understood and is of fundamental importance as normal tissue tolerance is a limiting factor. Here, we studied the effects of concurrent TMZ/XRT followed by adjuvant TMZ on type B stem cells and type A neuroblasts of the V-SVZ in C57BL/6 mice. We found that chemoradiation induced an apoptotic response in type A neuroblasts, as marked by cleavage of caspase 3, but not in NSCs, and that A cells within the V-SVZ were repopulated given sufficient recovery time. 53BP1 foci formation and resolution was used to assess the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Remarkably, the repair was the same in type B and type A cells. While Bax expression was the same for type A or B cells, antiapoptotic Bcl2 and Mcl1 expression was significantly greater in NSCs. Thus, the resistance of type B NSCs to TMZ/XRT appears to be due, in part, to high basal expression of antiapoptotic proteins compared with type A cells. This preclinical research, demonstrating that murine NSCs residing in the V-SVZ are tolerant of standard chemoradiation therapy, supports a dose escalation strategy for treatment of GBM. Stem Cells 2019;37:1629-1639.
© 2019 The Authors. Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2019.
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19 MeSH Terms
Rabbit Model of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy Toxicity Demonstrates Retinopathy and Vasculopathy Related to Drug and Dose, Not Procedure or Approach.
Daniels AB, Froehler MT, Nunnally AH, Pierce JM, Bozic I, Stone CA, Santapuram PR, Tao YK, Boyd KL, Himmel LE, Chen SC, Du L, Friedman DL, Richmond A
(2019) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 60: 954-964
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Carboplatin, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electroretinography, Female, Fluorescein Angiography, Humans, Infant, Infusions, Intra-Arterial, Male, Melphalan, Models, Animal, Ophthalmic Artery, Rabbits, Retina, Retinal Diseases, Retinal Neoplasms, Retinal Vessels, Retinoblastoma, Retrospective Studies, Tomography, Optical Coherence
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2019
Purpose - To use our intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) rabbit model to assess the impact of IAC procedure, drug, dose, and choice of technique on ocular structure and function, to study the nature and etiology of IAC toxicity, and to compare to observations in patients.
Methods - Rabbits received IAC melphalan (0.4-0.8 mg/kg), carboplatin (25-50 mg), or saline, either by direct ophthalmic artery cannulation, or with a technique emulating nonocclusion. Ocular structure/function were assessed with examination, electroretinography (ERG), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and OCT angiography, prior to and 5 to 6 weeks after IAC. Blood counts were obtained weekly. We reviewed our last 50 IAC treatments in patients for evidence of ocular or systemic complications.
Results - No toxicity was seen in the saline control group. With standard (0.4 mg/kg) melphalan, no vascular/microvascular abnormalities were seen with either technique. However, severe microvascular pruning and arteriolar occlusions were seen occasionally at 0.8 mg/kg doses. ERG reductions were dose-dependent. Histology showed melphalan dose-dependent degeneration in all retinal layers, restricted geographically to areas of greatest vascular density. Carboplatin caused massive edema of ocular/periocular structures. IAC patients experienced occasional periocular swelling/rash, and only rarely experienced retinopathy or vascular events/hemorrhage in eyes treated multiple times with triple (melphalan/carboplatin/topotecan) therapy. Transient neutropenia occurred after 46% of IAC procedures, generally after triple therapy.
Conclusions - IAC toxicity appears to be related to the specific drug being used and is dose-dependent, rather than related to the IAC procedure itself or the specific technique selected. These rabbit findings are corroborated by our clinical findings in patients.
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Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Localization, Toxicity, and Treatment Efficacy in the First Small Animal (Rabbit) Model of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Retinoblastoma.
Daniels AB, Froehler MT, Pierce JM, Nunnally AH, Calcutt MW, Bridges TM, LaNeve DC, Williams PE, Boyd KL, Reyzer ML, Lindsley CW, Friedman DL, Richmond A
(2018) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 59: 446-454
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Disease Models, Animal, Electroretinography, Fluorescein Angiography, Infusions, Intra-Arterial, Melphalan, Ophthalmic Artery, Rabbits, Retina, Retinal Neoplasms, Retinoblastoma, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Tissue Distribution, Treatment Outcome, Vitreous Body
Show Abstract · Added April 5, 2018
Purpose - Current intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) drug regimens for retinoblastoma have ocular and vascular toxicities. No small-animal model of IAC exists to test drug efficacy and toxicity in vivo for IAC drug discovery. The purpose of this study was to develop a small-animal model of IAC and to analyze the ocular tissue penetration, distribution, pharmacokinetics, and treatment efficacy.
Methods - Following selective ophthalmic artery (OA) catheterization, melphalan (0.4 to 1.2 mg/kg) was injected. For pharmacokinetic studies, rabbits were euthanized at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 6 hours following intra-OA infusion. Drug levels were determined in vitreous, retina, and blood by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To assess toxicity, angiograms, photography, fluorescein angiography, and histopathology were performed. For in situ tissue drug distribution, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) was performed. The tumor model was created by combined subretinal/intravitreal injection of human WERI-Rb1 retinoblastoma cells; the tumor was treated in vivo with intra-arterial melphalan or saline; and induction of tumor death was measured by cleaved caspase-3 activity.
Results - OA was selectively catheterized for 79 of 79 (100%) eyes in 47 of 47 (100%) rabbits, and melphalan was delivered successfully in 31 of 31 (100%) eyes, without evidence of vascular occlusion or retinal damage. For treated eyes, maximum concentration (Cmax) in the retina was 4.95 μM and area under the curve (AUC0→∞) was 5.26 μM·h. Treated eye vitreous Cmax was 2.24 μM and AUC0→∞ was 4.19 μM·h. Vitreous Cmax for the treated eye was >100-fold higher than for the untreated eye (P = 0.01), and AUC0→∞ was ∼50-fold higher (P = 0.01). Histology-directed MALDI-IMS revealed highest drug localization within the retina. Peripheral blood Cmax was 1.04 μM and AUC0→∞ was 2.07 μM·h. Combined subretinal/intravitreal injection of human retinoblastoma cells led to intra-retinal tumors and subretinal/vitreous seeds, which could be effectively killed in vivo with intra-arterial melphalan.
Conclusions - This first small-animal model of IAC has excellent vitreous and retinal tissue drug penetration, achieving levels sufficient to kill human retinoblastoma cells, facilitating future IAC drug discovery.
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16 MeSH Terms
Effect of selumetinib vs chemotherapy on progression-free survival in uveal melanoma: a randomized clinical trial.
Carvajal RD, Sosman JA, Quevedo JF, Milhem MM, Joshua AM, Kudchadkar RR, Linette GP, Gajewski TF, Lutzky J, Lawson DH, Lao CD, Flynn PJ, Albertini MR, Sato T, Lewis K, Doyle A, Ancell K, Panageas KS, Bluth M, Hedvat C, Erinjeri J, Ambrosini G, Marr B, Abramson DH, Dickson MA, Wolchok JD, Chapman PB, Schwartz GK
(2014) JAMA 311: 2397-405
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Benzimidazoles, Dacarbazine, Disease Progression, Female, Humans, Male, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Survival Analysis, Temozolomide, Treatment Outcome, Uveal Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2014
IMPORTANCE - Uveal melanoma is characterized by mutations in GNAQ and GNA11, resulting in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.
OBJECTIVE - To assess the efficacy of selumetinib, a selective, non-adenosine triphosphate competitive inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2, in uveal melanoma.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - Randomized, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial comparing selumetinib vs chemotherapy conducted from August 2010 through December 2013 among 120 patients with metastatic uveal melanoma at 15 academic oncology centers in the United States and Canada.
INTERVENTIONS - One hundred one patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive selumetinib, 75 mg orally twice daily on a continual basis (n = 50), or chemotherapy (temozolomide, 150 mg/m2 orally daily for 5 of every 28 days, or dacarbazine, 1000 mg/m2 intravenously every 21 days [investigator choice]; n = 51) until disease progression, death, intolerable adverse effects, or withdrawal of consent. After primary outcome analysis, 19 patients were registered and 18 treated with selumetinib without randomization to complete the planned 120-patient enrollment. Patients in the chemotherapy group could receive selumetinib at the time of radiographic progression.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES - Progression-free survival, the primary end point, was assessed as of April 22, 2013. Additional end points, including overall survival, response rate, and safety/toxicity, were assessed as of December 31, 2013.
RESULTS - Median progression-free survival among patients randomized to chemotherapy was 7 weeks (95% CI, 4.3-8.4 weeks; median treatment duration, 8 weeks; interquartile range [IQR], 4.3-16 weeks) and among those randomized to selumetinib was 15.9 weeks (95% CI, 8.4-21.1 weeks; median treatment duration, 16.1 weeks; IQR, 8.1-25.3 weeks) (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30-0.71; P < .001). Median overall survival time was 9.1 months (95% CI, 6.1-11.1 months) with chemotherapy and 11.8 months (95% CI, 9.8-15.7 months) with selumetinib (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.41-1.06; P = .09). No objective responses were observed with chemotherapy. Forty-nine percent of patients treated with selumetinib achieved tumor regression, with 14% achieving an objective radiographic response to therapy. Treatment-related adverse events were observed in 97% of patients treated with selumetinib, with 37% requiring at least 1 dose reduction.
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE - In this hypothesis-generating study of patients with advanced uveal melanoma, selumetinib compared with chemotherapy resulted in a modestly improved progression-free survival and response rate; however, no improvement in overall survival was observed. Improvement in clinical outcomes was accompanied by a high rate of adverse events.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01143402.
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16 MeSH Terms
Phase II study of bendamustine in relapsed chemotherapy sensitive or resistant small-cell lung cancer.
Lammers PE, Shyr Y, Li CI, Hutchison AS, Sandler A, Carbone DP, Johnson DH, Keedy VL, Horn L
(2014) J Thorac Oncol 9: 559-62
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neoplasm Staging, Nitrogen Mustard Compounds, Prognosis, Salvage Therapy, Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2014
INTRODUCTION - To determine the time to progression (TTP), response rate (RR), and toxicity for North American patients with relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) treated with bendamustine in the second- or third-line setting.
METHODS - Patients with relapsed, histologically confirmed SCLC were eligible for enrollment on study. The study population included patients with both chemotherapy-sensitive and chemotherapy-resistant disease treated with up to two prior lines of chemotherapy. Patients were treated with 120 mg/m of bendamustine on days 1 and 2 of a 21-day cycle for up to six cycles. Primary end point was TTP; secondary end points included toxicity, RR, and overall survival.
RESULTS - Fifty-nine patients were accrued, 50 patients met eligibility for enrollment. The median age of patients was 62, and 56% were men. Twenty-nine patients (58%) had chemotherapy-sensitive disease. Median TTP was 4.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3-5.4), median overall survival was 4.8 months (95% CI, 3.8-6.3), and the RR was 26% (95% CI, 13.3%-39.5%). Patients with chemosensitive disease had a median TTP of 4.2 months (95% CI, 3.3-6.0) compared with 3.4 months (95% CI, 2.7-∞) for chemotherapy-resistant disease. The RR was 33% (95% CI, 14.2%-51.8%) in patients with chemosensitive disease and 17% (95% CI, 0%-34.4%) in those with chemoresistant disease. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (20%), dyspnea (12%), and anemia (12%).
CONCLUSION - Bendamustine has modest activity in relapsed SCLC similar to other agents evaluated in this patient population.
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Integrating cell-based and clinical genome-wide studies to identify genetic variants contributing to treatment failure in neuroblastoma patients.
Pinto N, Gamazon ER, Antao N, Myers J, Stark AL, Konkashbaev A, Im HK, Diskin SJ, London WB, Ludeman SM, Maris JM, Cox NJ, Cohn SL, Dolan ME
(2014) Clin Pharmacol Ther 95: 644-52
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Brain Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Child, Cohort Studies, Cyclohexylamines, Cyclophosphamide, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Neuroblastoma, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quality Control, RNA, Small Interfering, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Risk Assessment, Treatment Failure
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive malignancy, with high rates of treatment failure. We evaluated genetic variants associated with in vitro sensitivity to two derivatives of cyclophosphamide for association with clinical response in a separate replication cohort of neuroblastoma patients (n = 2,709). To determine sensitivity, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were exposed to increasing concentrations of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC; n = 422) and phosphoramide mustard (PM; n = 428). Genome-wide association studies were performed to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with sensitivity to 4HC and PM. SNPs consistently associated with LCL sensitivity were analyzed for associations with event-free survival (EFS) in patients. Two linked SNPs, rs9908694 and rs1453560, were found to be associated with (i) sensitivity to PM in LCLs across populations and (ii) EFS in all patients (P = 0.01) and within the high-risk subset (P = 0.05). Our study highlights the value of cell-based models to identify candidate variants that may predict response to treatment in patients with cancer.
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21 MeSH Terms
Cyclophosphamide creates a receptive microenvironment for prostate cancer skeletal metastasis.
Park SI, Liao J, Berry JE, Li X, Koh AJ, Michalski ME, Eber MR, Soki FN, Sadler D, Sud S, Tisdelle S, Daignault SD, Nemeth JA, Snyder LA, Wronski TJ, Pienta KJ, McCauley LK
(2012) Cancer Res 72: 2522-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Bone Marrow, Bone Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Chemokine CCL2, Cyclophosphamide, Docetaxel, Humans, Interleukin-6, Male, Mice, Myeloid Cells, Neoplasm Transplantation, Prostatic Neoplasms, Taxoids
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
A number of cancers predominantly metastasize to bone, due to its complex microenvironment and multiple types of constitutive cells. Prostate cancer especially has been shown to localize preferentially to bones with higher marrow cellularity. Using an experimental prostate cancer metastasis model, we investigated the effects of cyclophosphamide, a bone marrow-suppressive chemotherapeutic drug, on the development and growth of metastatic tumors in bone. Priming the murine host with cyclophosphamide before intracardiac tumor cell inoculation was found to significantly promote tumor localization and subsequent growth in bone. Shortly after cyclophosphamide treatment, there was an abrupt expansion of myeloid lineage cells in the bone marrow and the peripheral blood, associated with increases in cytokines with myelogenic potential such as C-C chemokine ligand (CCL)2, interleukin (IL)-6, and VEGF-A. More importantly, neutralizing host-derived murine CCL2, but not IL-6, in the premetastatic murine host significantly reduced the prometastatic effects of cyclophosphamide. Together, our findings suggest that bone marrow perturbation by cytotoxic chemotherapy can contribute to bone metastasis via a transient increase in bone marrow myeloid cells and myelogenic cytokines. These changes can be reversed by inhibition of CCL2.
©2012 AACR.
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16 MeSH Terms
Phase II, open-label, randomized trial of the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib as monotherapy versus temozolomide in patients with advanced melanoma.
Kirkwood JM, Bastholt L, Robert C, Sosman J, Larkin J, Hersey P, Middleton M, Cantarini M, Zazulina V, Kemsley K, Dummer R
(2012) Clin Cancer Res 18: 555-67
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Benzimidazoles, DNA Mutational Analysis, Dacarbazine, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Substitution, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, MAP Kinase Kinase 1, MAP Kinase Kinase 2, Male, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neoplasm Staging, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Temozolomide, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
PURPOSE - To compare the efficacy and tolerability of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP)/extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor selumetinib versus temozolomide in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - This phase II, open-label, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group study examined the effect of 100 mg oral selumetinib twice daily in 28-day cycles versus oral temozolomide (200 mg/m(2)/d for 5 days, then 23 days off-treatment). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival.
RESULTS - Two hundred patients were randomized. Progression-free survival did not differ significantly between selumetinib and temozolomide (median time to event 78 and 80 days, respectively; hazard ratio, 1.07; 80% confidence interval, 0.86-1.32). Objective response was observed in six (5.8%) patients receiving selumetinib and nine (9.4%) patients in the temozolomide group. Among patients with BRAF mutations, objective responses were similar between selumetinib and temozolomide groups (11.1% and 10.7%, respectively). However, five of the six selumetinib partial responders were BRAF mutated. Frequently reported adverse events with selumetinib were dermatitis acneiform (papular pustular rash; 59.6%), diarrhea (56.6%), nausea (50.5%), and peripheral edema (40.4%), whereas nausea (64.2%), constipation (47.4%), and vomiting (44.2%) were reported with temozolomide.
CONCLUSIONS - No significant difference in progression-free survival was observed between patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma unselected for BRAF/NRAS mutations, who received therapy with selumetinib or temozolomide. Five of six patients with partial response to selumetinib had BRAF mutant tumors.
©2011 AACR.
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24 MeSH Terms
Ecteinascidin 743 interferes with the activity of EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma cells.
Grohar PJ, Griffin LB, Yeung C, Chen QR, Pommier Y, Khanna C, Khan J, Helman LJ
(2011) Neoplasia 13: 145-53
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Bone Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Child, DAX-1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor, Dioxoles, Europe, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Oncogene Proteins, Fusion, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Proto-Oncogene Protein c-fli-1, RNA-Binding Protein EWS, RNA-Binding Protein FUS, Sarcoma, Sarcoma, Ewing, Tetrahydroisoquinolines, Trabectedin, Transcription Factor CHOP
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
ET-743 (trabectedin; Yondelis) is approved in Europe for the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas. Emerging phase 1 and 2 clinical data have shown high response rates in myxoid liposarcoma in part owing to the inhibition of the FUS-CHOP transcription factor. In this report, we show that modulation of specific oncogenic transcription factors by ET-743 may extend to other tumor types. We demonstrate that, among a panel of pediatric sarcomas, Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) cell lines bearing the EWS-FLI1 transcription factor are the most sensitive to treatment with ET-743 compared with osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and synovial sarcoma. We show that ET-743 reverses a gene signature of induced downstream targets of EWS-FLI1 in two different ESFT cell lines (P = .001). In addition, ET-743 directly suppresses the promoter activity of a known EWS-FLI1 downstream target NR0B1 luciferase reporter construct without changing the activity of a constitutively active control in ESFT cells. Furthermore, the effect is specific to EWS-FLI1, as forced expression of EWS-FLI1 in a cell type that normally lacks this fusion protein, HT1080 cells, induces the same NR0B1 promoter, but this activation is completely blocked by ET-743 treatment. Finally, we used gene set enrichment analysis to confirm that other mechanisms of ET-743 are active in ESFT cells. These results suggest a particular role for ET-743 in the treatment of translocation-positive tumors. In addition, the modulation of EWS-FLI1 makes it a novel targeting agent for ESFT and suggests that further development of this compound for the treatment of ESFT is warranted.
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Earlier detection of tumor treatment response using magnetic resonance diffusion imaging with oscillating gradients.
Colvin DC, Loveless ME, Does MD, Yue Z, Yankeelov TE, Gore JC
(2011) Magn Reson Imaging 29: 315-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Brain Neoplasms, Carmustine, Cell Line, Tumor, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Early Diagnosis, Glioma, Male, Oscillometry, Prognosis, Rats, Rats, Inbred F344, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2013
An improved method for detecting early changes in tumors in response to treatment, based on a modification of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, has been demonstrated in an animal model. Early detection of therapeutic response in tumors is important both clinically and in pre-clinical assessments of novel treatments. Noninvasive imaging methods that can detect and assess tumor response early in the course of treatment, and before frank changes in tumor morphology are evident, are of considerable interest as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to changes in water diffusion rates in tissues that result from structural variations in the local cellular environment, but conventional methods mainly reflect changes in tissue cellularity and do not convey information specific to microstructural variations at sub-cellular scales. We implemented a modified imaging technique using oscillating gradients of the magnetic field for evaluating water diffusion rates over very short spatial scales that are more specific for detecting changes in intracellular structure that may precede changes in cellularity. Results from a study of orthotopic 9L gliomas in rat brains indicate that this method can detect changes as early as 24 h following treatment with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, when conventional approaches do not find significant effects. These studies suggest that diffusion imaging using oscillating gradients may be used to obtain an earlier indication of treatment efficacy than previous magnetic resonance imaging methods.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms