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Antibody Determinants of Influenza Immunity.
Crowe JE
(2019) J Infect Dis 219: S21-S29
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antigens, Viral, B-Lymphocytes, Cross Reactions, Genetic Drift, Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Influenza A virus, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Neuraminidase, Point Mutation, Vaccination, Vaccines, Inactivated
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Understanding antigenic variation in influenza virus strains and how the human immune system recognizes strains are central challenges for vaccinologists. Antibodies directed to the 2 major viral surface membrane proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), mediate protection against reinfection following natural infection or vaccination, but HA and NA protein sequences in field strains are highly variable. The central questions are how to achieve protective antibody responses in a higher proportion of individuals and how to induce responses with more breadth and durability. Studies using isolation of human monoclonal antibodies followed by structural and functional characterization revealed conserved antigenic sites recognized by broadly cross-reactive antibodies. The antigenic landscape on HA and NA proteins is coming into focus to inform studies of the correlates and mechanisms of immunity. Understanding the antibody determinants of influenza immunity points the way toward development and testing of next-generation vaccines with potential to confer broadly protective immunity.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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17 MeSH Terms
Influenza Virus-Specific Human Antibody Repertoire Studies.
Crowe JE
(2019) J Immunol 202: 368-373
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Viral, Antibody Diversity, Antigenic Variation, Antigens, Viral, B-Lymphocytes, Humans, Influenza A virus, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The diversity of Ag-specific adaptive receptors on the surface of B cells and in the population of secreted Abs is enormous, but increasingly, we are acquiring the technical capability to interrogate Ab repertoires in great detail. These Ab technologies have been especially pointed at understanding the complex issues of immunity to infection and disease caused by influenza virus, one of the most common and vexing medical problems in man. Influenza immunity is particularly interesting as a model system because the antigenic diversity of influenza strains and proteins is high and constantly evolving. Discovery of canonical features in the subset of the influenza repertoire response that is broadly reactive for diverse influenza strains has spurred the recent optimism for creating universal influenza vaccines. Using new technologies for sequencing Ab repertoires at great depth is helping us to understand the central features of influenza immunity.
Copyright © 2019 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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10 MeSH Terms
Multiple Introductions and Antigenic Mismatch with Vaccines May Contribute to Increased Predominance of G12P[8] Rotaviruses in the United States.
Ogden KM, Tan Y, Akopov A, Stewart LS, McHenry R, Fonnesbeck CJ, Piya B, Carter MH, Fedorova NB, Halpin RA, Shilts MH, Edwards KM, Payne DC, Esona MD, Mijatovic-Rustempasic S, Chappell JD, Patton JT, Halasa NB, Das SR
(2019) J Virol 93:
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Capsid Proteins, Child, Preschool, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Infant, Phylogeny, Population Surveillance, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, Sequence Analysis, RNA, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Rotavirus is the leading global cause of diarrheal mortality for unvaccinated children under 5 years of age. The outer capsid of rotavirus virions consists of VP7 and VP4 proteins, which determine viral G and P types, respectively, and are primary targets of neutralizing antibodies. Successful vaccination depends upon generating broadly protective immune responses following exposure to rotaviruses presenting a limited number of G- and P-type antigens. Vaccine introduction resulted in decreased rotavirus disease burden but also coincided with the emergence of uncommon G and P genotypes, including G12. To gain insight into the recent predominance of G12P[8] rotaviruses in the United States, we evaluated 142 complete rotavirus genome sequences and metadata from 151 clinical specimens collected in Nashville, TN, from 2011 to 2013 through the New Vaccine Surveillance Network. Circulating G12P[8] strains were found to share many segments with other locally circulating strains but to have distinct constellations. Phylogenetic analyses of G12 sequences and their geographic sources provided evidence for multiple separate introductions of G12 segments into Nashville, TN. Antigenic epitopes of VP7 proteins of G12P[8] strains circulating in Nashville, TN, differ markedly from those of vaccine strains. Fully vaccinated children were found to be infected with G12P[8] strains more frequently than with other rotavirus genotypes. Multiple introductions and significant antigenic mismatch may in part explain the recent predominance of G12P[8] strains in the United States and emphasize the need for continued monitoring of rotavirus vaccine efficacy against emerging rotavirus genotypes. Rotavirus is an important cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide. Two immunodominant proteins of rotavirus, VP7 and VP4, determine G and P genotypes, respectively. Recently, G12P[8] rotaviruses have become increasingly predominant. By analyzing rotavirus genome sequences from stool specimens obtained in Nashville, TN, from 2011 to 2013 and globally circulating rotaviruses, we found evidence of multiple introductions of G12 genes into the area. Based on sequence polymorphisms, VP7 proteins of these viruses are predicted to present themselves to the immune system very differently than those of vaccine strains. Many of the sick children with G12P[8] rotavirus in their diarrheal stools also were fully vaccinated. Our findings emphasize the need for continued monitoring of circulating rotaviruses and the effectiveness of the vaccines against strains with emerging G and P genotypes.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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13 MeSH Terms
Reovirus-Induced Apoptosis in the Intestine Limits Establishment of Enteric Infection.
Brown JJ, Short SP, Stencel-Baerenwald J, Urbanek K, Pruijssers AJ, McAllister N, Ikizler M, Taylor G, Aravamudhan P, Khomandiak S, Jabri B, Williams CS, Dermody TS
(2018) J Virol 92:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Viral, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Cricetinae, Epithelial Cells, Intestinal Mucosa, Mammalian orthoreovirus 3, Mice, Orthoreovirus, Mammalian, Reoviridae Infections
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Several viruses induce intestinal epithelial cell death during enteric infection. However, it is unclear whether proapoptotic capacity promotes or inhibits replication in this tissue. We infected mice with two reovirus strains that infect the intestine but differ in the capacity to alter immunological tolerance to new food antigen. Infection with reovirus strain T1L, which induces an inflammatory immune response to fed antigen, is prolonged in the intestine, whereas T3D-RV, which does not induce this response, is rapidly cleared from the intestine. Compared with T1L, T3D-RV infection triggered apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells and subsequent sloughing of dead cells into the intestinal lumen. We conclude that the infection advantage of T1L derives from its capacity to subvert host restriction by epithelial cell apoptosis, providing a possible mechanism by which T1L enhances inflammatory signals during antigen feeding. Using a panel of T1L × T3D-RV reassortant viruses, we identified the viral M1 and M2 gene segments as determinants of reovirus-induced apoptosis in the intestine. Expression of the T1L M1 and M2 genes in a T3D-RV background was sufficient to limit epithelial cell apoptosis and enhance viral infection to levels displayed by T1L. These findings define additional reovirus gene segments required for enteric infection of mice and illuminate the antiviral effect of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in limiting enteric viral infection. Viral strain-specific differences in the capacity to infect the intestine may be useful in identifying viruses capable of ameliorating tolerance to fed antigen in autoimmune conditions like celiac disease. Acute viral infections are thought to be cleared by the host with few lasting consequences. However, there may be much broader and long-lasting effects of viruses on immune homeostasis. Infection with reovirus, a common, nonpathogenic virus, triggers inflammation against innocuous food antigens, implicating this virus in the development of celiac disease, an autoimmune intestinal disorder triggered by exposure to dietary gluten. Using two reovirus strains that differ in the capacity to abrogate oral tolerance, we found that strain-specific differences in the capacity to replicate in the intestine inversely correlate with the capacity to induce apoptotic death of intestinal epithelial cells, providing a host-mediated process to restrict intestinal infection. This work contributes new knowledge about virus-host interactions in the intestine and establishes a foundation for future studies to define mechanisms by which viruses break oral tolerance in celiac disease.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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MeSH Terms
Structure-function characterization of three human antibodies targeting the vaccinia virus adhesion molecule D8.
Matho MH, Schlossman A, Gilchuk IM, Miller G, Mikulski Z, Hupfer M, Wang J, Bitra A, Meng X, Xiang Y, Kaever T, Doukov T, Ley K, Crotty S, Peters B, Hsieh-Wilson LC, Crowe JE, Zajonc DM
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 390-401
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antibody Formation, Antigens, Viral, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Epitopes, Humans, Neutralization Tests, Protein Binding, Structure-Activity Relationship, Vaccinia virus, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Vaccinia virus (VACV) envelope protein D8 is one of three glycosaminoglycan adhesion molecules and binds to the linear polysaccharide chondroitin sulfate (CS). D8 is also a target for neutralizing antibody responses that are elicited by the smallpox vaccine, which has enabled the first eradication of a human viral pathogen and is a useful model for studying antibody responses. However, to date, VACV epitopes targeted by human antibodies have not been characterized at atomic resolution. Here, we characterized the binding properties of several human anti-D8 antibodies and determined the crystal structures of three VACV-mAb variants, VACV-66, VACV-138, and VACV-304, separately bound to D8. Although all these antibodies bound D8 with high affinity and were moderately neutralizing in the presence of complement, VACV-138 and VACV-304 also fully blocked D8 binding to CS-A, the low affinity ligand for D8. VACV-138 also abrogated D8 binding to the high-affinity ligand CS-E, but we observed residual CS-E binding was observed in the presence of VACV-304. Analysis of the VACV-138- and VACV-304-binding sites along the CS-binding crevice of D8, combined with different efficiencies of blocking D8 adhesion to CS-A and CS-E allowed us to propose that D8 has a high- and low-affinity CS-binding region within its central crevice. The crevice is amenable to protein engineering to further enhance both specificity and affinity of binding to CS-E. Finally, a wild-type D8 tetramer specifically bound to structures within the developing glomeruli of the kidney, which express CS-E. We propose that through structure-based protein engineering, an improved D8 tetramer could be used as a potential diagnostic tool to detect expression of CS-E, which is a possible biomarker for ovarian cancer.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Severe Delayed Drug Reactions: Role of Genetics and Viral Infections.
Pavlos R, White KD, Wanjalla C, Mallal SA, Phillips EJ
(2017) Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 37: 785-815
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Autoantigens, Cross Reactions, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, HLA Antigens, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Polymorphism, Genetic, Risk, T-Lymphocytes, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant source of patient morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden to health care systems and drug development. Up to 50% of such reactions are preventable. Although many ADRs can be predicted based on the on-target pharmacologic activity, ADRs arising from drug interactions with off-target receptors are recognized. Off-target ADRs include the immune-mediated ADRs (IM-ADRs) and pharmacologic drug effects. In this review, we discuss what is known about the immunogenetics and pathogenesis of IM-ADRs and the hypothesized role of heterologous immunity in the development of IM-ADRs.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Rapid antigen tests for dengue virus serotypes and Zika virus in patient serum.
Bosch I, de Puig H, Hiley M, Carré-Camps M, Perdomo-Celis F, Narváez CF, Salgado DM, Senthoor D, O'Grady M, Phillips E, Durbin A, Fandos D, Miyazaki H, Yen CW, Gélvez-Ramírez M, Warke RV, Ribeiro LS, Teixeira MM, Almeida RP, Muñóz-Medina JE, Ludert JE, Nogueira ML, Colombo TE, Terzian ACB, Bozza PT, Calheiros AS, Vieira YR, Barbosa-Lima G, Vizzoni A, Cerbino-Neto J, Bozza FA, Souza TML, Trugilho MRO, de Filippis AMB, de Sequeira PC, Marques ETA, Magalhaes T, Díaz FJ, Restrepo BN, Marín K, Mattar S, Olson D, Asturias EJ, Lucera M, Singla M, Medigeshi GR, de Bosch N, Tam J, Gómez-Márquez J, Clavet C, Villar L, Hamad-Schifferli K, Gehrke L
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antigens, Viral, Chromatography, Affinity, Dengue Virus, Epitope Mapping, Humans, ROC Curve, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sequence Alignment, Serogroup, Zika Virus
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak demonstrates that cost-effective clinical diagnostics are urgently needed to detect and distinguish viral infections to improve patient care. Unlike dengue virus (DENV), ZIKV infections during pregnancy correlate with severe birth defects, including microcephaly and neurological disorders. Because ZIKV and DENV are related flaviviruses, their homologous proteins and nucleic acids can cause cross-reactions and false-positive results in molecular, antigenic, and serologic diagnostics. We report the characterization of monoclonal antibody pairs that have been translated into rapid immunochromatography tests to specifically detect the viral nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein antigen and distinguish the four DENV serotypes (DENV1-4) and ZIKV without cross-reaction. To complement visual test analysis and remove user subjectivity in reading test results, we used image processing and data analysis for data capture and test result quantification. Using a 30-μl serum sample, the sensitivity and specificity values of the DENV1-4 tests and the pan-DENV test, which detects all four dengue serotypes, ranged from 0.76 to 1.00. Sensitivity/specificity for the ZIKV rapid test was 0.81/0.86, respectively, using a 150-μl serum input. Serum ZIKV NS1 protein concentrations were about 10-fold lower than corresponding DENV NS1 concentrations in infected patients; moreover, ZIKV NS1 protein was not detected in polymerase chain reaction-positive patient urine samples. Our rapid immunochromatography approach and reagents have immediate application in differential clinical diagnosis of acute ZIKV and DENV cases, and the platform can be applied toward developing rapid antigen diagnostics for emerging viruses.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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Principles of Broad and Potent Antiviral Human Antibodies: Insights for Vaccine Design.
Crowe JE
(2017) Cell Host Microbe 22: 193-206
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antigens, Viral, Antiviral Agents, Cross Reactions, Drug Design, Genes, Reporter, Humans, Immunity, Models, Molecular, Neutralization Tests, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Vaccination, Vaccines, Viral Envelope Proteins, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Antibodies are the principal immune effectors that mediate protection against reinfection following viral infection or vaccination. Robust techniques for human mAb isolation have been developed in the last decade. The study of human mAbs isolated from subjects with prior immunity has become a mainstay for rational structure-based, next-generation vaccine development. The plethora of detailed molecular and genetic studies coupling the structure of antigen-antibody complexes with their antiviral function has begun to reveal common principles of critical interactions on which we can build better vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. This review outlines the approaches to isolating and studying human antiviral mAbs and discusses the common principles underlying the basis for their activity. This review also examines progress toward the goal of achieving a comprehensive understanding of the chemical and physical basis for molecular recognition of viral surface proteins in order to build predictive molecular models that can be used for vaccine design.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
Patterns of Cellular Immunity Associated with Experimental Infection with rDEN2Δ30 (Tonga/74) Support Its Suitability as a Human Dengue Virus Challenge Strain.
Grifoni A, Angelo M, Sidney J, Paul S, Peters B, de Silva AD, Phillips E, Mallal S, Diehl SA, Botten J, Boyson J, Kirkpatrick BD, Whitehead SS, Durbin AP, Sette A, Weiskopf D
(2017) J Virol 91:
MeSH Terms: 3' Untranslated Regions, Antigens, Viral, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Dengue, Dengue Virus, Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay, Epitopes, Humans, Interferon-gamma, Sequence Deletion
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
A deletion variant of the dengue virus (DENV) serotype 2 (DENV2) Tonga/74 strain lacking 30 nucleotides from its 3' untranslated region (rDEN2Δ30) has previously been established for use in a controlled human DENV challenge model. To evaluate if this model is appropriate for the derivation of correlates of protection for DENV vaccines on the basis of cellular immunity, we wanted to compare the cellular immune response to this challenge strain to the response induced by natural infection. To achieve this, we predicted HLA class I- and class II-restricted peptides from rDEN2Δ30 and used them in a gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay to interrogate CD8 and CD4 T cell responses in healthy volunteers infected with rDEN2Δ30. At the level of CD8 responses, vigorous responses were detected in approximately 80% of donors. These responses were similar in terms of the magnitude and the numbers of epitopes recognized to the responses previously observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors from regions where DENV is hyperendemic. The similarity extended to the immunodominance hierarchy of the DENV nonstructural proteins, with NS3, NS5, and NS1 being dominant in both donor cohorts. At the CD4 level, the responses to rDEN2Δ30 vaccination were less vigorous than those to natural DENV infection and were more focused on nonstructural proteins. The epitopes recognized following rDEN2Δ30 infection and natural infection were largely overlapping for both the CD8 (100%) and CD4 (85%) responses. Finally, rDEN2Δ30 induced stronger CD8 responses than other, more attenuated DENV isolates. The lack of a known correlate of protection and the failure of a neutralizing antibody to correlate with protection against dengue virus have highlighted the need for a human DENV challenge model to better evaluate the candidate live attenuated dengue vaccines. In this study, we sought to characterize the immune profiles of rDEN2Δ30-infected subjects and to compare the profiles with those for subjects from areas where DENV is hyperendemic. Our data demonstrate that T cell responses to rDENV2Δ30 are largely similar to those to natural infection in terms of specificity, highlighting that the response to this virus in humans is appropriate as a model for the T cell response to primary DENV2 infection.
Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.
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Determinants of VH1-46 Cross-Reactivity to Pemphigus Vulgaris Autoantigen Desmoglein 3 and Rotavirus Antigen VP6.
Cho MJ, Ellebrecht CT, Hammers CM, Mukherjee EM, Sapparapu G, Boudreaux CE, McDonald SM, Crowe JE, Payne AS
(2016) J Immunol 197: 1065-73
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Autoantigens, Capsid Proteins, Cross Reactions, Desmoglein 3, Dual-Specificity Phosphatases, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Pemphigus, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Rotavirus Infections
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
Shared VH1-46 gene usage has been described in B cells reacting to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) in the autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), as well as B cells responding to rotavirus capsid protein VP6. In both diseases, VH1-46 B cells bearing few to no somatic mutations can recognize the disease Ag. This intriguing connection between an autoimmune response to self-antigen and an immune response to foreign Ag prompted us to investigate whether VH1-46 B cells may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity. Focused testing of VH1-46 mAbs previously isolated from PV and rotavirus-exposed individuals indicates that cross-reactivity is rare, found in only one of seven VH1-46 IgG clonotypes. High-throughput screening of IgG B cell repertoires from two PV patients identified no additional cross-reactive clonotypes. Screening of IgM B cell repertoires from one non-PV and three PV patients identified specific cross-reactive Abs in one PV patient, but notably all six cross-reactive clonotypes used VH1-46. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that amino acid residues predisposing VH1-46 Abs to Dsg3 reactivity reside in CDR2. However, somatic mutations only rarely promote Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity; most mutations abolish VP6 and/or Dsg3 reactivity. Nevertheless, functional testing identified two cross-reactive VH1-46 Abs that both disrupt keratinocyte adhesion and inhibit rotavirus replication, indicating the potential for VH1-46 Abs to have both pathologic autoimmune and protective immune functions. Taken together, these studies suggest that certain VH1-46 B cell populations may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity, but multiple mechanisms prevent the onset of autoimmunity after rotavirus exposure.
Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms