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GABA interneurons are the cellular trigger for ketamine's rapid antidepressant actions.
Gerhard DM, Pothula S, Liu RJ, Wu M, Li XY, Girgenti MJ, Taylor SR, Duman CH, Delpire E, Picciotto M, Wohleb ES, Duman RS
(2020) J Clin Invest 130: 1336-1349
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Female, GABAergic Neurons, Gene Knockout Techniques, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Parvalbumins, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Sex Characteristics, Somatostatin
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant actions in depressed patients, addressing a major unmet need for the treatment of mood disorders. Ketamine produces a rapid increase in extracellular glutamate and synaptic formation in the prefrontal cortex, but the initial cellular trigger that initiates this increase and ketamine's behavioral actions has not been identified. To address this question, we used a combination of viral shRNA and conditional mutation to produce cell-specific knockdown or deletion of a key NMDAR subunit, GluN2B, implicated in the actions of ketamine. The results demonstrated that the antidepressant actions of ketamine were blocked by GluN2B-NMDAR knockdown on GABA (Gad1) interneurons, as well as subtypes expressing somatostatin (Sst) or parvalbumin (Pvalb), but not glutamate principle neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Further analysis of GABA subtypes showed that cell-specific knockdown or deletion of GluN2B in Sst interneurons blocked or occluded the antidepressant actions of ketamine and revealed sex-specific differences that are associated with excitatory postsynaptic currents on mPFC principle neurons. These findings demonstrate that GluN2B-NMDARs on GABA interneurons are the initial cellular trigger for the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and show sex-specific adaptive mechanisms to GluN2B modulation.
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Further exploration of an N-aryl phenoxyethoxy pyridinone-based series of mGlu NAMs: Challenging SAR, enantiospecific activity and in vivo efficacy.
Yamada Y, Yohn SE, Gilliland K, Loch MT, Schulte ML, Rodriguez AL, Blobaum AL, Niswender CM, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW
(2019) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 29: 2670-2674
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Anxiety Agents, Antidepressive Agents, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Mice, Molecular Structure, Pyridones, Rats, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Stereoisomerism, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
This letter describes the further optimization of a series of mGlu NAMs based on an N-aryl phenoxyethoxy pyridinone core. A multidimensional optimization campaign, with focused matrix libraries, quickly established challenging SAR, enantiospecific activity, differences in assay read-outs (Ca flux via a promiscuous G protein (G) versus native coupling to GIRK channels), identified both full and partial mGlu NAMs and a new in vivo tool compound, VU6017587. This mGlu NAM showed efficacy in tail suspension, elevated zero maze and marble burying, suggesting selective inhibition of mGlu affords anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like phenotypes in mice.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Association between First Trimester Antidepressant Use and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion.
Wu P, Velez Edwards DR, Gorrindo P, Sundermann AC, Torstenson ES, Jones SH, Chan RL, Hartmann KE
(2019) Pharmacotherapy 39: 889-898
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Antidepressive Agents, Female, Humans, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, First, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2020
STUDY OBJECTIVE - The potential for maternal antidepressant use to influence the risk of spontaneous abortion, one of the most important adverse pregnancy outcomes, is not clear. We aimed to assess whether first trimester antidepressant exposure was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion.
DESIGN - Community-based prospective cohort study (Right from the Start).
SETTING - Eight metropolitan areas in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.
PARTICIPANTS - A total of 5451 women (18 years of age or older) who were planning to conceive or were pregnant (before 12 weeks of completed gestation) and were enrolled in the study between 2000 and 2012; of those women, 223 used antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] only [170], SSRIs and non-SSRIs [9], and non-SSRIs only [44]) during their first trimester, and 5228 did not (never users). Measurements and Main Results First trimester antidepressant use was determined during a first trimester telephone interview. Spontaneous abortion was self-reported and verified by medical records. The association of first trimester antidepressant use and spontaneous abortion was assessed by using Cox proportional hazard regression. Among the 5451 women enrolled, 223 (4%) reported first trimester antidepressant use, and 659 (12%) experienced a spontaneous abortion. SSRIs were the most common class of antidepressants used (179 [80%]). Compared with women who never used antidepressants during the first trimester of pregnancy, women who reported antidepressant use were 34% (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97-1.85) more likely to experience a spontaneous abortion after adjusting for covariates. Women who reported ever using SSRIs were 45% (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.02-2.06) more likely to experience a spontaneous abortion compared with never users. When time of loss relative to the time of interview was taken into consideration, the association between first trimester SSRI use and spontaneous abortion was significant only among those with losses before the interview (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.04-2.13) but was not significant among those with losses after the interview (aHR 0.43, 95% CI 0.06-3.15).
CONCLUSION - The association between use of first trimester antidepressants, particularly SSRI use, and spontaneous abortion was significant only among women whose exposure status was assessed after loss. In this instance, reporting bias may create a spurious association. Future studies should take the timing of data collection relative to the timing of loss into consideration.
© 2019 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.
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Photoperiod during maternal pregnancy and lifetime depression in offspring.
Devore EE, Chang SC, Okereke OI, McMahon DG, Schernhammer ES
(2018) J Psychiatr Res 104: 169-175
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antidepressive Agents, Cohort Studies, Depression, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Maternal Exposure, Middle Aged, Nurses, Photoperiod, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Suicide, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Experimental studies indicate that perinatal light exposure has enduring effects on affective behaviors in rodents; however, insufficient research has explored this hypothesis in humans. We examined photoperiod (i.e., day length) metrics during maternal pregnancy in relation to lifetime depression in the longitudinal Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHS II. 160,723 participants reported birth date and birth state (used to derive daily photoperiod based on published mathematical equations), and clinician-diagnosed depression and antidepressant use throughout adulthood. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) for depression (defined as clinician diagnosis and antidepressant use) across quintiles of two exposures during maternal pregnancy: 1) total photoperiod (total number of daylight hours) and 2) differences between minimum/maximum photoperiod; each trimester of pregnancy was examined separately. Total photoperiod during maternal pregnancy was not associated with depression overall or by trimester of pregnancy. However, larger differences between minimum/maximum photoperiod during maternal pregnancy were related to lower odds of depression (multivariable [MV]-adjusted OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.83, 0.90 comparing extreme quintiles of exposure; p-trend<0.0001); this association appeared specific to the second trimester of pregnancy (MV-adjusted p-trends = 0.03, <0.0001, and 0.3 across the three trimesters, respectively). In addition, birth at higher latitude (where larger differences in minimum/maximum photoperiod exist) was associated with a significant reduction in the lifetime risk of depression. These findings are consistent with an emerging hypothesis in which perinatal light exposure may influence risk of depression, and they might be understood through the conceptual framework of adaptive developmental plasticity.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Adrenal serotonin derives from accumulation by the antidepressant-sensitive serotonin transporter.
Brindley RL, Bauer MB, Walker LA, Quinlan MA, Carneiro AMD, Sze JY, Blakely RD, Currie KPM
(2019) Pharmacol Res 140: 56-66
MeSH Terms: Adrenal Glands, Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Female, Male, Mesencephalon, Mice, Transgenic, Models, Animal, Rhombencephalon, Serotonin, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Spinal Cord, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2018
Adrenal chromaffin cells comprise the neuroendocrine arm of the sympathetic nervous system and secrete catecholamines to coordinate the appropriate stress response. Deletion of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) gene in mice (SERT mice) or pharmacological block of SERT function in rodents and humans augments this sympathoadrenal stress response (epinephrine secretion). The prevailing assumption is that loss of CNS SERT alters central drive to the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Adrenal chromaffin cells also prominently express SERT where it might coordinate accumulation of 5-HT for reuse in the autocrine control of stress-evoked catecholamine secretion. To help test this hypothesis, we have generated a novel mouse model with selective excision of SERT in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SERT), generated by crossing floxed SERT mice with tyrosine hydroxylase Cre driver mice. SERT expression, assessed by western blot, was abolished in the adrenal gland but not perturbed in the CNS of SERT mice. SERT-mediated [H] 5-HT uptake was unaltered in midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord synaptosomes, confirming transporter function was intact in the CNS. Endogenous midbrain and whole blood 5-HT homeostasis was unperturbed in SERT mice, contrasting with the depleted 5-HT content in SERT mice. Selective SERT excision reduced adrenal gland 5-HT content by ≈ 50% in SERT mice but had no effect on adrenal catecholamine content. This novel model confirms that SERT expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells is essential for maintaining wild-type levels of 5-HT and provides a powerful tool to help dissect the role of SERT in the sympathetic stress response.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Predictors of recurrence in remitted late-life depression.
Deng Y, McQuoid DR, Potter GG, Steffens DC, Albert K, Riddle M, Beyer JL, Taylor WD
(2018) Depress Anxiety 35: 658-667
MeSH Terms: Activities of Daily Living, Age of Onset, Aged, Antidepressive Agents, Brain, Comorbidity, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Recurrence, Remission Induction, Sex Factors, Social Support, Stress, Psychological, Suicidal Ideation
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with a fragile antidepressant response and high recurrence risk. This study examined what measures predict recurrence in remitted LLD.
METHODS - Individuals of age 60 years or older with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of major depressive disorder were enrolled in the neurocognitive outcomes of depression in the elderly study. Participants received manualized antidepressant treatment and were followed longitudinally for an average of 5 years. Study analyses included participants who remitted. Measures included demographic and clinical measures, medical comorbidity, disability, life stress, social support, and neuropsychological testing. A subset underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
RESULTS - Of 241 remitted elders, approximately over 4 years, 137 (56.8%) experienced recurrence and 104 (43.2%) maintained remission. In the final model, greater recurrence risk was associated with female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.536; confidence interval [CI] = 1.027-2.297), younger age of onset (HR = 0.990; CI = 0.981-0.999), higher perceived stress (HR = 1.121; CI = 1.022-1.229), disability (HR = 1.060; CI = 1.005-1.119), and less support with activities (HR = 0.885; CI = 0.812-0.963). Recurrence risk was also associated with higher Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores prior to censoring (HR = 1.081; CI = 1.033-1.131) and baseline symptoms of suicidal thoughts by MADRS (HR = 1.175; CI = 1.002-1.377) and sadness by Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (HR = 1.302; CI, 1.080-1.569). Sex, age of onset, and suicidal thoughts were no longer associated with recurrence in a model incorporating report of multiple prior episodes (HR = 2.107; CI = 1.252-3.548). Neither neuropsychological test performance nor MRI measures of aging pathology were associated with recurrence.
CONCLUSIONS - Over half of the depressed elders who remitted experienced recurrence, mostly within 2 years. Multiple clinical and environmental measures predict recurrence risk. Work is needed to develop instruments that stratify risk.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Stimulation of entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus circuitry is antidepressive.
Yun S, Reynolds RP, Petrof I, White A, Rivera PD, Segev A, Gibson AD, Suarez M, DeSalle MJ, Ito N, Mukherjee S, Richardson DR, Kang CE, Ahrens-Nicklas RC, Soler I, Chetkovich DM, Kourrich S, Coulter DA, Eisch AJ
(2018) Nat Med 24: 658-666
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Behavior, Animal, Chronic Disease, Dendrites, Dentate Gyrus, Entorhinal Cortex, Glutamates, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Net, Neurogenesis, Peroxins, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is considered a 'circuitopathy', and brain stimulation therapies hold promise for ameliorating MDD symptoms, including hippocampal dysfunction. It is unknown whether stimulation of upstream hippocampal circuitry, such as the entorhinal cortex (Ent), is antidepressive, although Ent stimulation improves learning and memory in mice and humans. Here we show that molecular targeting (Ent-specific knockdown of a psychosocial stress-induced protein) and chemogenetic stimulation of Ent neurons induce antidepressive-like effects in mice. Mechanistically, we show that Ent-stimulation-induced antidepressive-like behavior relies on the generation of new hippocampal neurons. Thus, controlled stimulation of Ent hippocampal afferents is antidepressive via increased hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings emphasize the power and potential of Ent glutamatergic afferent stimulation-previously well-known for its ability to influence learning and memory-for MDD treatment.
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Frontocingulate cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity associated with antidepressant response in late-life depression.
Abi Zeid Daou M, Boyd BD, Donahue MJ, Albert K, Taylor WD
(2017) J Affect Disord 215: 103-110
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aging, Antidepressive Agents, Depression, Female, Frontal Lobe, Gyrus Cinguli, Hemodynamics, Humans, Late Onset Disorders, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Sertraline, Spin Labels, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
BACKGROUND - Vascular pathology is common in late-life depression (LLD) and may contribute to alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR). In turn, such hemodynamic deficits may adversely affect brain function and clinical course. The goal of this study was to examine whether altered cerebral hemodynamics in depressed elders predicted antidepressant response.
METHODS - 21 depressed elders completed cranial 3T MRI, including a pseudo-continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (pcASL) acquisition on both room air and during a hypercapnia challenge. Participants then completed 12 weeks of open-label sertraline. Statistical analyses examined the relationship between regional normalized CBF and CVR values and change in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and tested for differences based on remission status.
RESULTS - 10 participants remitted and 11 did not. After controlling for age and baseline MADRS, greater change in MADRS with treatment was associated with lower pre-treatment normalized CBF in the caudal anterior cingulate cortex (cACC) and lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), as well as lower CVR with hypercapnia in the caudal medial frontal gyrus (cMFG). After controlling for age and baseline MADRS score, remitters exhibited lower CBF in the cACC and lower CVR in the cMFG.
LIMITATIONS - Our sample was small, did not include a placebo arm, and we examined only specific regions of interest.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings suggest that increased perfusion of the OFC and the ACC is associated with a poor antidepressant response. They do not support that vascular pathology as measured by CBF and CVR negatively affects acute treatment outcomes.
Published by Elsevier B.V.
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Serotonin Transporter-Independent Actions of the Antidepressant Vortioxetine As Revealed Using the SERT Met172 Mouse.
Nackenoff AG, Simmler LD, Baganz NL, Pehrson AL, Sánchez C, Blakely RD
(2017) ACS Chem Neurosci 8: 1092-1100
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Behavior, Animal, Depression, Disease Models, Animal, Hindlimb Suspension, Hippocampus, Mice, Neurogenesis, Piperazines, Serotonin, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Sulfides, Synaptosomes, Vortioxetine
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2018
Selective serotonin (5-HT, SERT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed treatments for depression. However, they have delayed efficacy and can induce side-effects that can encourage discontinuation. Recently, agents have been developed, including vortioxetine (Trintellix), that augment SERT blockade with interactions at other targets. At therapeutic doses, vortioxetine interacts with SERT as well as 5-HT, 5-HT, 5-HT, and 5-HT receptors. We assessed the SERT-dependency of vortioxetine action using the SERT Met172 mouse model, which disrupts high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants with the transporter. We demonstrate that the SERT Met172 substitution induces an ∼19-fold loss in vortioxetine potency for SERT inhibition in midbrain synaptosomes. Moreover, in these mice, we observed reduced SERT occupancy, a diminished ability to prolong 5-HT clearance, and a reduced capacity to elevate extracellular 5-HT. Despite reduced interactions with SERT, vortioxetine maintained its ability to enhance mobility in tail suspension and forced swim tests, reduce consumption latency in the novelty induced hypophagia test, and promoted proliferation and survival of subgranular zone hippocampal stem cells. Our findings suggest that the antidepressant actions of vortioxetine may be SERT-independent, and encourage consideration of agents that mimic one or more actions of the drug in the development of improved depression treatments.
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Effect of psychotropic drug treatment on sterol metabolism.
Korade Ž, Liu W, Warren EB, Armstrong K, Porter NA, Konradi C
(2017) Schizophr Res 187: 74-81
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Antipsychotic Agents, Body Mass Index, Cholestadienols, Clozapine, Dehydrocholesterols, Female, Haloperidol, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Mental Disorders, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Random Allocation, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Weight Gain
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Cholesterol metabolism is vital for brain function. Previous work in cultured cells has shown that a number of psychotropic drugs inhibit the activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), an enzyme that catalyzes the final steps in cholesterol biosynthesis. This leads to the accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC), a molecule that gives rise to oxysterols, vitamin D, and atypical neurosteroids. We examined levels of cholesterol and the cholesterol precursors desmosterol, lanosterol, 7DHC and its isomer 8-dehydrocholesterol (8DHC), in blood samples of 123 psychiatric patients on various antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs, and 85 healthy controls, to see if the observations in cell lines hold true for patients as well. Three drugs, aripiprazole, haloperidol and trazodone increased circulating 7DHC and 8DHC levels, while five other drugs, clozapine, escitalopram/citalopram, lamotrigine, olanzapine, and risperidone, did not. Studies in rat brain verified that haloperidol dose-dependently increased 7DHC and 8DHC levels, while clozapine had no effect. We conclude that further studies should investigate the role of 7DHC and 8DHC metabolites, such as oxysterols, vitamin D, and atypical neurosteroids, in the deleterious and therapeutic effects of psychotropic drugs. Finally, we recommend that drugs that increase 7DHC levels should not be prescribed during pregnancy, as children born with DHCR7 deficiency have multiple congenital malformations.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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