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Identification and Characterization of Unique Neutralizing Antibodies to Mouse EGF Receptor.
Jae Huh W, Niitsu H, Carney B, McKinley ET, Houghton JL, Coffey RJ
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 1500-1502
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Azoxymethane, Carcinogens, Cells, Cultured, Colonic Neoplasms, Dextran Sulfate, Disease Models, Animal, ErbB Receptors, Gastritis, Hypertrophic, Genes, Reporter, Hepatocytes, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Primary Cell Culture
Added January 31, 2020
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Increased reporting of fatal hepatitis associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors.
Vozy A, De Martin E, Johnson DB, Lebrun-Vignes B, Moslehi JJ, Salem JE
(2019) Eur J Cancer 123: 112-115
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, B7-H1 Antigen, CTLA-4 Antigen, Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury, Child, Databases, Factual, Female, Hepatitis, Autoimmune, Humans, Ipilimumab, Male, Massive Hepatic Necrosis, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Nivolumab, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, World Health Organization, Young Adult
Added November 12, 2019
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Immune checkpoint inhibitor-associated hypophysitis-World Health Organisation VigiBase report analysis.
Guerrero E, Johnson DB, Bachelot A, Lebrun-Vignes B, Moslehi JJ, Salem JE
(2019) Eur J Cancer 113: 10-13
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, B7-H1 Antigen, CTLA-4 Antigen, Databases, Factual, Female, Humans, Hypophysitis, Ipilimumab, Male, Middle Aged, Nivolumab, Pharmacovigilance, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, World Health Organization, Young Adult
Added November 12, 2019
0 Communities
1 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
Hematologic Complications of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.
Davis EJ, Salem JE, Young A, Green JR, Ferrell PB, Ancell KK, Lebrun-Vignes B, Moslehi JJ, Johnson DB
(2019) Oncologist 24: 584-588
MeSH Terms: Adult, Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, B7-H1 Antigen, Databases, Factual, Female, Hematologic Diseases, Humans, Incidence, Ipilimumab, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Pharmacovigilance, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Immune checkpoint inhibitors have improved outcomes for patients with numerous hematological and solid cancers. Hematologic toxicities have been described, but the spectrum, timing, and clinical presentation of these complications are not well understood. We used the World Health Organization's pharmacovigilance database of individual-case-safety-reports (ICSRs) of adverse drug reactions, VigiBase, to identify cases of hematologic toxicities complicating immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. We identified 168 ICSRs of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), hemolytic anemia (HA), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, aplastic anemia, and pure red cell aplasia in 164 ICSRs. ITP ( = 68) and HA ( = 57) were the most common of these toxicities and occurred concomitantly in four patients. These events occurred early on treatment (median 40 days) and were associated with fatal outcome in 12% of cases. Ipilimumab-based therapy (monotherapy or combination with anti-programmed death-1 [PD-1]) was associated with earlier onset (median 23 vs. 47.5 days,  = .006) than anti-PD-1/programmed death ligand-1 monotherapy. Reporting of hematologic toxicities has increased over the past 2 years (98 cases between January 2017 and March 2018 vs. 70 cases before 2017), possibly because of increased use of checkpoint inhibitors and improved recognition of toxicities. Future studies should evaluate incidence of hematologic toxicities, elucidate risk factors, and determine the most effective treatment algorithms. KEY POINTS: Immune-mediated hematologic toxicities are a potential side effect of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs).Providers should monitor complete blood counts during treatment with ICIs.Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for immune-mediated hematologic toxicities.Further research is needed to define patient-specific risk factors and optimal management strategies for hematologic toxicities.
© AlphaMed Press 2019.
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19 MeSH Terms
Computational Immune Monitoring Reveals Abnormal Double-Negative T Cells Present across Human Tumor Types.
Greenplate AR, McClanahan DD, Oberholtzer BK, Doxie DB, Roe CE, Diggins KE, Leelatian N, Rasmussen ML, Kelley MC, Gama V, Siska PJ, Rathmell JC, Ferrell PB, Johnson DB, Irish JM
(2019) Cancer Immunol Res 7: 86-99
MeSH Terms: Adenoids, Adult, Aged, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Female, Humans, Imidazoles, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Immunologic, Neoplasms, Oximes, Palatine Tonsil, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf, Pyridones, Pyrimidinones, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added November 11, 2018
Advances in single-cell biology have enabled measurements of >40 protein features on millions of immune cells within clinical samples. However, the data analysis steps following cell population identification are susceptible to bias, time-consuming, and challenging to compare across studies. Here, an ensemble of unsupervised tools was developed to evaluate four essential types of immune cell information, incorporate changes over time, and address diverse immune monitoring challenges. The four complementary properties characterized were (i) systemic plasticity, (ii) change in population abundance, (iii) change in signature population features, and (iv) novelty of cellular phenotype. Three systems immune monitoring studies were selected to challenge this ensemble approach. In serial biopsies of melanoma tumors undergoing targeted therapy, the ensemble approach revealed enrichment of double-negative (DN) T cells. Melanoma tumor-resident DN T cells were abnormal and phenotypically distinct from those found in nonmalignant lymphoid tissues, but similar to those found in glioblastoma and renal cell carcinoma. Overall, ensemble systems immune monitoring provided a robust, quantitative view of changes in both the system and cell subsets, allowed for transparent review by human experts, and revealed abnormal immune cells present across multiple human tumor types.
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
3 Communities
2 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Clinical activity and molecular correlates of response to atezolizumab alone or in combination with bevacizumab versus sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma.
McDermott DF, Huseni MA, Atkins MB, Motzer RJ, Rini BI, Escudier B, Fong L, Joseph RW, Pal SK, Reeves JA, Sznol M, Hainsworth J, Rathmell WK, Stadler WM, Hutson T, Gore ME, Ravaud A, Bracarda S, Suárez C, Danielli R, Gruenwald V, Choueiri TK, Nickles D, Jhunjhunwala S, Piault-Louis E, Thobhani A, Qiu J, Chen DS, Hegde PS, Schiff C, Fine GD, Powles T
(2018) Nat Med 24: 749-757
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Bevacizumab, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Sunitinib, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
We describe results from IMmotion150, a randomized phase 2 study of atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1) alone or combined with bevacizumab (anti-VEGF) versus sunitinib in 305 patients with treatment-naive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Co-primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) in intent-to-treat and PD-L1+ populations. Intent-to-treat PFS hazard ratios for atezolizumab + bevacizumab or atezolizumab monotherapy versus sunitinib were 1.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-1.45) and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.82-1.71), respectively; PD-L1+ PFS hazard ratios were 0.64 (95% CI, 0.38-1.08) and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.63-1.67), respectively. Exploratory biomarker analyses indicated that tumor mutation and neoantigen burden were not associated with PFS. Angiogenesis, T-effector/IFN-γ response, and myeloid inflammatory gene expression signatures were strongly and differentially associated with PFS within and across the treatments. These molecular profiles suggest that prediction of outcomes with anti-VEGF and immunotherapy may be possible and offer mechanistic insights into how blocking VEGF may overcome resistance to immune checkpoint blockade.
0 Communities
1 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Use of a neutralizing antibody helps identify structural features critical for binding of toxin TcdA to the host cell surface.
Kroh HK, Chandrasekaran R, Rosenthal K, Woods R, Jin X, Ohi MD, Nyborg AC, Rainey GJ, Warrener P, Spiller BW, Lacy DB
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 14401-14412
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Binding Sites, Antibody, Caco-2 Cells, Clostridium difficile, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enterocytes, Enterotoxins, Epitope Mapping, Glucosyltransferases, Humans, Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments, Models, Molecular, Peptide Fragments, Protein Conformation, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Recombinant Proteins, Repetitive Sequences, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
is a clinically significant pathogen that causes mild-to-severe (and often recurrent) colon infections. Disease symptoms stem from the activities of two large, multidomain toxins known as TcdA and TcdB. The toxins can bind, enter, and perturb host cell function through a multistep mechanism of receptor binding, endocytosis, pore formation, autoproteolysis, and glucosyltransferase-mediated modification of host substrates. Monoclonal antibodies that neutralize toxin activity provide a survival benefit in preclinical animal models and prevent recurrent infections in human clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in these neutralizing activities are unclear. To this end, we performed structural studies on a neutralizing monoclonal antibody, PA50, a humanized mAb with both potent and broad-spectrum neutralizing activity, in complex with TcdA. Electron microscopy imaging and multiangle light-scattering analysis revealed that PA50 binds multiple sites on the TcdA C-terminal combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROPs) domain. A crystal structure of two PA50 Fabs bound to a segment of the TcdA CROPs helped define a conserved epitope that is distinct from previously identified carbohydrate-binding sites. Binding of TcdA to the host cell surface was directly blocked by either PA50 mAb or Fab and suggested that receptor blockade is the mechanism by which PA50 neutralizes TcdA. These findings highlight the importance of the CROPs C terminus in cell-surface binding and a role for neutralizing antibodies in defining structural features critical to a pathogen's mechanism of action. We conclude that PA50 protects host cells by blocking the binding of TcdA to cell surfaces.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Structural basis for nonneutralizing antibody competition at antigenic site II of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein.
Mousa JJ, Sauer MF, Sevy AM, Finn JA, Bates JT, Alvarado G, King HG, Loerinc LB, Fong RH, Doranz BJ, Correia BE, Kalyuzhniy O, Wen X, Jardetzky TS, Schief WR, Ohi MD, Meiler J, Crowe JE
(2016) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113: E6849-E6858
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antiviral Agents, Cell Line, Crystallography, X-Ray, Epitope Mapping, Epitopes, Humans, Mice, Mutagenesis, Palivizumab, Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human, Viral Fusion Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2017
Palivizumab was the first antiviral monoclonal antibody (mAb) approved for therapeutic use in humans, and remains a prophylactic treatment for infants at risk for severe disease because of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Palivizumab is an engineered humanized version of a murine mAb targeting antigenic site II of the RSV fusion (F) protein, a key target in vaccine development. There are limited reported naturally occurring human mAbs to site II; therefore, the structural basis for human antibody recognition of this major antigenic site is poorly understood. Here, we describe a nonneutralizing class of site II-specific mAbs that competed for binding with palivizumab to postfusion RSV F protein. We also describe two classes of site II-specific neutralizing mAbs, one of which escaped competition with nonneutralizing mAbs. An X-ray crystal structure of the neutralizing mAb 14N4 in complex with F protein showed that the binding angle at which human neutralizing mAbs interact with antigenic site II determines whether or not nonneutralizing antibodies compete with their binding. Fine-mapping studies determined that nonneutralizing mAbs that interfere with binding of neutralizing mAbs recognize site II with a pose that facilitates binding to an epitope containing F surface residues on a neighboring protomer. Neutralizing antibodies, like motavizumab and a new mAb designated 3J20 that escape interference by the inhibiting mAbs, avoid such contact by binding at an angle that is shifted away from the nonneutralizing site. Furthermore, binding to rationally and computationally designed site II helix-loop-helix epitope-scaffold vaccines distinguished neutralizing from nonneutralizing site II antibodies.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.
Itani HA, McMaster WG, Saleh MA, Nazarewicz RR, Mikolajczyk TP, Kaszuba AM, Konior A, Prejbisz A, Januszewicz A, Norlander AE, Chen W, Bonami RH, Marshall AF, Poffenberger G, Weyand CM, Madhur MS, Moore DJ, Harrison DG, Guzik TJ
(2016) Hypertension 68: 123-32
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analysis of Variance, Angiotensin II, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Cells, Cultured, Chi-Square Distribution, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Middle Aged, Random Allocation, Reference Values, Sampling Studies, Statistics, Nonparametric, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added May 25, 2016
Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Effect of Drug Therapy on Net Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein-Enriched Serum in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Ormseth MJ, Yancey PG, Solus JF, Bridges SL, Curtis JR, Linton MF, Fazio S, Davies SS, Roberts LJ, Vickers KC, Kon V, Michael Stein C, TETRAD Investigators
(2016) Arthritis Rheumatol 68: 2099-105
MeSH Terms: Adalimumab, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Biological Transport, Blood Sedimentation, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Lipoproteins, HDL, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Methotrexate, Middle Aged, Serum
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Some RA therapies may modify this risk, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The cholesterol efflux capacity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is associated with a reduced CHD risk in non-RA populations; however, inflammation may impair the function of HDL. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether reduced inflammation resulting from treatment with methotrexate (MTX), adalimumab (ADA), or tocilizumab (TCZ) would increase the net cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL in patients with RA.
METHODS - A longitudinal multicenter study repository (Treatment Efficacy and Toxicity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Database and Repository) provided clinical information for and serum samples from 70 patients with RA before and 6 months after starting treatment with a new drug (MTX [n = 23], ADA [n = 22], or TCZ [n = 25]). Disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR). The net cholesterol efflux capacity was measured in paired serum samples using THP-1 macrophages, and total cellular cholesterol was measured by fluorometric assay.
RESULTS - The DAS28-ESR decreased with all treatments (P < 0.001). Net cholesterol efflux capacity was not significantly changed after 6 months of new RA therapy (mean ± SD 36.9 ± 17.3% units at baseline versus 38.0% ± 16.9% units at 6 months [P = 0.58]). However, change in net cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with change in the DAS28-ESR (ρ = -0.25, P = 0.04). In a post hoc analysis of patients with impaired net cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline, treatment with TCZ resulted in significant improvement in net cholesterol efflux capacity (21.9 ± 14.7% units at baseline versus 31.3% ± 12.8% units at 6 months [P < 0.02]), but this was not observed with MTX or ADA.
CONCLUSION - Net cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL cholesterol did not change significantly after 6 months of new RA therapy, except in patients with impaired baseline cholesterol efflux capacity who were receiving TCZ. Change in disease activity was associated with change in the net cholesterol efflux capacity.
© 2016, American College of Rheumatology.
1 Communities
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MeSH Terms