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Nonconventional Therapeutics against .
Grunenwald CM, Bennett MR, Skaar EP
(2018) Microbiol Spectr 6:
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacteriophages, Biofilms, Drug Discovery, Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial, Humans, Phage Therapy, Photochemotherapy, Quorum Sensing, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Virulence, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
is one of the most important human pathogens that is responsible for a variety of diseases ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to endocarditis and sepsis. In recent decades, the treatment of staphylococcal infections has become increasingly difficult as the prevalence of multi-drug resistant strains continues to rise. With increasing mortality rates and medical costs associated with drug resistant strains, there is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic options. Many innovative strategies for alternative drug development are being pursued, including disruption of biofilms, inhibition of virulence factor production, bacteriophage-derived antimicrobials, anti-staphylococcal vaccines, and light-based therapies. While many compounds and methods still need further study to determine their feasibility, some are quickly approaching clinical application and may be available in the near future.
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Serologic Response to Helicobacter pylori Proteins Associated With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Diverse Populations in the United States.
Butt J, Varga MG, Blot WJ, Teras L, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman C, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GYF, Tinker LE, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Hyslop T, Um C, Grodstein F, Song M, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Berndt S, Hildesheim A, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 175-186.e2
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, United States, Virulence, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Previous studies reported an association of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of gastric cancer, and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, these findings have been inconsistent, appear to vary with population characteristics, and may be specific for virulence factor VacA. To more thoroughly evaluate the potential association of H pylori antibodies with CRC risk, we assembled a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations in the United States.
METHODS - We used H pylori multiplex serologic assays to analyze serum samples from 4063 incident cases of CRC, collected before diagnosis, and 4063 matched individuals without CRC (controls) from 10 prospective cohorts for antibody responses to 13 H pylori proteins, including virulence factors VacA and CagA. The association of seropositivity to H pylori proteins, as well as protein-specific antibody level, with odds of CRC was determined by conditional logistic regression.
RESULTS - Overall, 40% of controls and 41% of cases were H pylori-seropositive (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20). H pylori VacA-specific seropositivity was associated with an 11% increased odds of CRC (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.22), and this association was particularly strong among African Americans (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.08-1.95). Additionally, odds of CRC increased with level of VacA antibody in the overall cohort (P = .008) and specifically among African Americans (P = .007).
CONCLUSIONS - In an analysis of a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations, we found serologic responses to H pylori VacA to associate with increased risk of CRC risk, particularly for African Americans. Future studies should seek to understand whether this marker is related to virulent H pylori strains carried in these populations.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Antibody Responses to Subspecies Proteins in a Large Prospective Colorectal Cancer Cohort Consortium.
Butt J, Blot WJ, Teras LR, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman CA, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GY, Tinker LF, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2018) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 27: 1186-1194
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibody Formation, Bacterial Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2018
Antibody responses to subspecies (SGG) proteins, especially pilus protein Gallo2178, have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Previous case-control studies and prospective studies with up to 8 years of follow-up, however, were unable to decipher the temporality of antibody responses to SGG in the context of the long-term multistep development of colorectal cancer. In this study, we analyzed a large U.S. colorectal cancer cohort consortium with follow-up beyond 10 years for antibody responses to SGG. We applied multiplex serology to measure antibody responses to 9 SGG proteins in participants of 10 prospective U.S. cohorts (CLUE, CPSII, HPFS, MEC, NHS, NYUWHS, PHS, PLCO, SCCS, and WHI) including 4,063 incident colorectal cancer cases and 4,063 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess whether antibody responses to SGG were associated with colorectal cancer risk, overall and by time between blood draw and diagnosis. Colorectal cancer risk was increased among those with antibody responses to Gallo2178, albeit not statistically significant [OR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-1.52]. This association was stronger for cases diagnosed <10 years after blood draw (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.09-1.79), but was not found among cases diagnosed ≥10 years after blood draw (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.50-1.24). In a large cohort consortium, we reproduced the association of antibody responses to SGG Gallo2178 with colorectal cancer risk for individuals diagnosed within 10 years after blood draw. This timing-specific finding suggests that antibody responses to SGG are associated with increased colorectal cancer risk only after tumorigenesis has begun. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Staphylococcus aureus Bicomponent Leukotoxin AB Isolated Following Invasive Human Infection Reveal Diverse Binding and Modes of Action.
Thomsen IP, Sapparapu G, James DBA, Cassat JE, Nagarsheth M, Kose N, Putnam N, Boguslawski KM, Jones LS, Wood JB, Creech CB, Torres VJ, Crowe JE
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 1124-1131
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibodies, Monoclonal, B-Lymphocytes, Bacterial Proteins, Child, Female, Humans, Hybridomas, Leukocidins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neutrophils, Regression Analysis, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
The 2-component leukotoxin LukAB is critical for Staphylococcus aureus targeting and killing of human neutrophils ex vivo and is produced in the setting of human infection. We report 3 LukAB-specific human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with distinct mechanisms of toxin neutralization and in vivo efficacy. Three hybridomas secreting mAbs with anti-LukAB activity (designated SA-13, -15, and -17) were generated from B cells obtained from a 12-year-old boy with S. aureus osteomyelitis. Each of the 3 mAbs neutralized LukAB-mediated neutrophil toxicity, exhibited differing levels of potency, recognized different antigenic sites on the toxin, and displayed at least 2 distinct mechanisms for cytotoxic inhibition. SA-15 bound exclusively to the dimeric form of the toxin, suggesting that human B cells recognize epitopes on the dimerized form of LukAB during natural infection. Both SA-13 and SA-17 bound the LukA monomer and the LukAB dimer. Although all 3 mAbs potently neutralized cytotoxicity, only SA-15 and SA-17 significantly inhibited toxin association with the cell surface. Treatment with a 1:1 mixture of mAbs SA-15 and SA-17 resulted in significantly lower bacterial colony counts in heart, liver, and kidneys in a murine model of S. aureus sepsis. These data describe the isolation of diverse and efficacious antitoxin mAbs.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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Helicobacter pylori blood biomarker for gastric cancer risk in East Asia.
Cai H, Ye F, Michel A, Murphy G, Sasazuki S, Taylor PR, Qiao YL, Park SK, Yoo KY, Jee SH, Cho ER, Kim J, Chen SC, Abnet CC, Tsugane S, Cai Q, Shu XO, Zheng W, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2016) Int J Epidemiol 45: 774-81
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Bacterial, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Far East, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Incidence, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
BACKGROUND - Incidence and mortality rates for gastric cancer, the fifth most commonly diagnosed and third most deadly cancer worldwide, are highest in East Asia. We sought to identify gastric cancer risk biomarkers among eight prospective studies from China, Japan and Korea.
METHODS - This pooled nested case-control study included 1608 incident non-cardia gastric cancer cases and 1958 matched controls. Pre-diagnostic antibody levels to 15 Helicobacter pylori proteins were assessed using multiplex serology. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
RESULTS - Sero-positivity to 10 H. pylori antigens (Omp, CagA, VacA, HcpC, HP 0305, GroEL, NapA, HyuA, Cad, HpaA) was associated with a 1.29- to 3.26-fold increase in odds of gastric cancer. Omp and HP 0305 consistently remained associated with gastric cancer risk after mutually adjusting for all other markers. Sero-positivity to both Omp and HP 0305 was associated with an over 4-fold increase in gastric cancer incidence (OR, 4.09; 95% CI 3.26-5.13). When limited to only those who are CagA+ H. pylori+, Omp/HP 0305 sero-positivity remained strongly associated with an over 3-fold increase in the odds of gastric cancer (OR, 3.34; 95% CI 2.27-4.91). The results were highly consistent among the cohorts.
CONCLUSIONS - We have confirmed new H. pylori biomarkers that are strongly associated with gastric cancer risk, even among those infected with the known H. pylori virulence factor CagA. These results may help to design cost-efficient prevention strategies to reduce gastric cancer incidence in East Asia.
© The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.
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Association of 4p14 TLR locus with antibodies to Helicobacter pylori.
Sung H, Camargo MC, Yu K, Weinstein SJ, Morgan DR, Albanes D, Rabkin CS
(2015) Genes Immun 16: 567-70
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Bacterial, Finland, Genome-Wide Association Study, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, Toll-Like Receptor 10, Toll-Like Receptor 6
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
A genome-wide association study among Europeans related polymorphisms of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) locus at 4p14 and the Fcγ receptor 2a locus at 1q23.3 to Helicobacter pylori serologic status. We replicated associations of 4p14 but not 1q23.3 with anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies in 1402 Finnish males. Importantly, our analysis clarified that the phenotype affected by 4p14 is quantitative level of these antibodies rather than association with seropositivity per se. In addition, we annotated variants at 4p14 as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) associated with TLR6/10 and FAM114A1. Our findings suggest that 4p14 polymorphisms are linked to host immune response to H. pylori infection but not to its acquisition.
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Anti-Helicobacter pylori Antibody Profiles in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-Positive and EBV-Negative Gastric Cancer.
Camargo MC, Kim KM, Matsuo K, Torres J, Liao LM, Morgan DR, Michel A, Waterboer T, Zabaleta J, Dominguez RL, Yatabe Y, Kim S, Rocha-Guevara ER, Lissowska J, Pawlita M, Rabkin CS
(2016) Helicobacter 21: 153-7
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antibodies, Bacterial, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
BACKGROUND - Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, but about 9% of cases harbor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the tumor cells. There is limited evidence on the possible interaction or antagonism between these infectious agents in gastric carcinogenesis.
METHODS - We compared H. pylori serologic profiles of EBV-positive (n = 58) and EBV-negative (n = 111) noncardia gastric cancer patients from the United States National Cancer Institute's International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium. EBV positivity of tumors was assessed by in situ hybridization. Serum levels of 15 antibodies to immunogenic proteins of H. pylori (Cad, CagA, Cagδ, CagM, Catalase, GroEL, HcpC, HP0231, HP0305, HpaA, HyuA, NapA, Omp, UreA, VacA) were assessed using bead-based multiplex serology. Logistic regression models were used to adjust odds ratios (OR) for country, age, sex, and year of diagnosis.
RESULTS - Seropositivity to individual proteins ranged up to 90% overall. Antibodies to Catalase were borderline associated with tumor EBV positivity (adjusted OR = 3.15, p = .0024, Bonferroni corrected p = .036). Distributions of other antibodies did not vary by tumor EBV status.
CONCLUSION - Similarity of host-response indicates the essential etiological role of H. pylori in EBV-positive gastric cancer.
© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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11 MeSH Terms
Identification of toxemia in patients with Clostridium difficile infection.
Yu H, Chen K, Wu J, Yang Z, Shi L, Barlow LL, Aronoff DM, Garey KW, Savidge TC, von Rosenvinge EC, Kelly CP, Feng H
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0124235
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Biological Assay, Blood Preservation, Cercopithecus aethiops, Clostridium difficile, Diverticulitis, Colonic, Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous, Enterotoxins, False Negative Reactions, Female, Glycosylation, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Immunoglobulin G, Multiple Trauma, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Protein Stability, Risk Factors, Toxemia, Vero Cells, Young Adult, rac1 GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Toxemia can develop in Clostridium difficile-infected animals, and correlates with severe and fulminant disease outcomes. Circumstantial evidence suggests that toxemia may occur in patients with C. difficile infection (CDI), but positive diagnosis is extremely rare. We analyzed the potential for C. difficile toxemia in patients, determined its characteristics, and assessed challenges. C. difficile toxins in serum from patients were tested using an ultrasensitive cell-based assay and further confirmed by Rac1 glucosylation assay. The factors that hinder a diagnosis of toxemia were assessed, including investigation of toxin stability, the level of toxins-specific neutralizing antibodies in sera and its effect on diagnosis limits. CDI patients develop detectable toxemia in some cases (2.3%). Toxins were relatively stable in stored sera. Neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies were present during infection and positively correlated with the diagnosis limits. Thus, the masking effect of toxin-specific neutralizing antibodies is the major obstacle in diagnosing C. difficile toxemia using cell-based bioassays.
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27 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori Biomarkers and Risk of Colorectal Oncogenesis--Response.
Epplein M, Peek RM, Blot WJ
(2014) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23: 366
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Bacterial, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male
Added March 12, 2014
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7 MeSH Terms
Present and past Helicobacter pylori infection in Mexican school children.
Mendoza E, Camorlinga-Ponce M, Perez-Perez G, Mera R, Vilchis J, Moran S, Rivera O, Coria R, Torres J, Correa P, Duque X
(2014) Helicobacter 19: 55-64
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Breath Tests, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Male, Mexico, Prevalence, Schools, Students, Urease
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - In developing countries, more than 50% of children have serological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, serological tests for H. pylori did not differentiate between active and past infection. The objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of active and past H. pylori infection utilizing functional urea breath test (UBT) and serological tests and evaluate factors associated with the infection.
METHODS - A total of 675 school children, 6-13 years of age, participated. UBT was performed to detect active H. pylori infection. Blood samples were obtained to determine iron status and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to the H. pylori whole-cell and to Cag A antigens by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Weight, height, and sociodemographic characteristics were recorded.
RESULTS - A total of 37.9% (95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 34.2-41.6) of school children had active or past H. pylori infection; of them, 73.8% (CI95% 68.4-79.2) were carrying CagA-positive strain, 26.5% (CI95% 23.2-29.8) had active infection, and 11.4% (95%CI: 9.0-13.8) had evidence of past H. pylori infection. School children with iron deficiency and low height for age had higher risk of H. pylori infection: [OR to active or past infection was 2.30 (CI 95% 1.01-5.23) and to active infection it was 2.64 (CI 95% 1.09-6.44)] compared to school children with normal iron status and height for age or with normal iron status but low height for age or with iron deficiency and normal height for age.
CONCLUSIONS - The estimated prevalence of infection depends of the test utilized. Frequency of H. pylori infection and carrying CagA-positive strains was high in this population. Malnutrition was associated with active H. pylori infection.
© 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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