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Wnt6 maintains anterior escort cells as an integral component of the germline stem cell niche.
Wang X, Page-McCaw A
(2018) Development 145:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Cadherins, Cell Count, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cell Survival, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Female, Germ Cells, Ligands, Models, Biological, Ovary, Signal Transduction, Stem Cell Niche, Wnt Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Stem cells reside in a niche, a local environment whose cellular and molecular complexity is still being elucidated. In ovaries, germline stem cells depend on cap cells for self-renewing signals and physical attachment. Germline stem cells also contact the anterior escort cells, and here we report that anterior escort cells are absolutely required for germline stem cell maintenance. When escort cells die from impaired Wnt signaling or expression, the loss of anterior escort cells causes loss of germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells function as an integral niche component by promoting DE-cadherin anchorage and by transiently expressing the Dpp ligand to promote full-strength BMP signaling in germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells are maintained by Wnt6 ligands produced by cap cells; without Wnt6 signaling, anterior escort cells die leaving vacancies in the niche, leading to loss of germline stem cells. Our data identify anterior escort cells as constituents of the germline stem cell niche, maintained by a cap cell-produced Wnt6 survival signal.
© 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Multiple Mechanisms Drive Calcium Signal Dynamics around Laser-Induced Epithelial Wounds.
Shannon EK, Stevens A, Edrington W, Zhao Y, Jayasinghe AK, Page-McCaw A, Hutson MS
(2017) Biophys J 113: 1623-1635
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Calcium, Calcium Signaling, Cell Membrane, Cytosol, Drosophila, Epithelial Cells, Lasers, Microscopy, Confocal, Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging, Wings, Animal, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Epithelial wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved process that requires coordination across a field of cells. Studies in many organisms have shown that cytosolic calcium levels rise within a field of cells around the wound and spread to neighboring cells, within seconds of wounding. Although calcium is a known potent second messenger and master regulator of wound-healing programs, it is unknown what initiates the rise of cytosolic calcium across the wound field. Here we use laser ablation, a commonly used technique for the precision removal of cells or subcellular components, as a tool to investigate mechanisms of calcium entry upon wounding. Despite its precise ablation capabilities, we find that this technique damages cells outside the primary wound via a laser-induced cavitation bubble, which forms and collapses within microseconds of ablation. This cavitation bubble damages the plasma membranes of cells it contacts, tens of microns away from the wound, allowing direct calcium entry from extracellular fluid into damaged cells. Approximately 45 s after this rapid influx of calcium, we observe a second influx of calcium that spreads to neighboring cells beyond the footprint of cavitation. The occurrence of this second, delayed calcium expansion event is predicted by wound size, indicating that a separate mechanism of calcium entry exists, corresponding to cell loss at the primary wound. Our research demonstrates that the damage profile of laser ablation is more similar to a crush injury than the precision removal of individual cells. The generation of membrane microtears upon ablation is consistent with studies in the field of optoporation, which investigate ablation-induced cellular permeability. We conclude that multiple types of damage, including microtears and cell loss, result in multiple mechanisms of calcium influx around epithelial wounds.
Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.
Bermingham DP, Hardaway JA, Refai O, Marks CR, Snider SL, Sturgeon SM, Spencer WC, Colbran RJ, Miller DM, Blakely RD
(2017) J Neurosci 37: 9288-9304
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Neurons, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly , remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function mutations. Here, we report the identity of , which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide and evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function. Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode , we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide and evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may contribute to risk for disorders linked to perturbed DA signaling. Targeting this pathway may be of value in the development of therapeutics in such disorders.
Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/379288-17$15.00/0.
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2 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Developmental experience-dependent plasticity in the first synapse of the Drosophila olfactory circuit.
Golovin RM, Broadie K
(2016) J Neurophysiol 116: 2730-2738
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Arthropod Antennae, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Nerve Net, Olfactory Pathways, Smell, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Evidence accumulating over the past 15 years soundly refutes the dogma that the Drosophila nervous system is hardwired. The preponderance of studies reveals activity-dependent neural circuit refinement driving optimization of behavioral outputs. We describe developmental, sensory input-dependent plasticity in the brain olfactory antennal lobe, which we term long-term central adaption (LTCA). LTCA is evoked by prolonged exposure to an odorant during the first week of posteclosion life, resulting in a persistently decreased response to aversive odors and an enhanced response to attractive odors. This limited window of early-use, experience-dependent plasticity represents a critical period of olfactory circuit refinement tuned by initial sensory input. Consequent behavioral adaptations have been associated with changes in the output of olfactory projection neurons to higher brain centers. Recent studies have indicated a central role for local interneuron signaling in LTCA presentation. Genetic and molecular analyses have implicated the mRNA-binding fragile X mental retardation protein and ataxin-2 regulators, Notch trans-synaptic signaling, and cAMP signal transduction as core regulatory steps driving LTCA. In this article, we discuss the structural, functional, and behavioral changes associated with LTCA and review our current understanding of the molecular pathways underlying these developmental, experience-dependent changes in the olfactory circuitry.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
1 Communities
1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.
Nguyen TT, Caito SW, Zackert WE, West JD, Zhu S, Aschner M, Fessel JP, Roberts LJ
(2016) Aging (Albany NY) 8: 1759-80
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Lipid Peroxidation, Longevity, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Sirtuins
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2016
Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension.
0 Communities
2 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation.
Yang E, Tacchelly-Benites O, Wang Z, Randall MP, Tian A, Benchabane H, Freemantle S, Pikielny C, Tolwinski NS, Lee E, Ahmed Y
(2016) Nat Commun 7: 11430
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Axin Protein, Cell Line, Tumor, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-6, Lymphocytes, Molecular Sequence Data, Proteolysis, Sequence Alignment, Tankyrases, Wnt Signaling Pathway, Wnt3A Protein, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added February 13, 2017
Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)--known to target Axin for proteolysis-regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly.
0 Communities
1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Differential impact of genetically modulated choline transporter expression on the release of endogenous versus newly synthesized acetylcholine.
Iwamoto H, Calcutt MW, Blakely RD
(2016) Neurochem Int 98: 138-45
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholine, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Choline, Gene Expression, Genotype, Membrane Transport Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Potassium, Prosencephalon, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2017
The efficient import of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals by the presynaptic, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7) dictates the capacity for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release. Tissue levels of ACh are significantly reduced in mice heterozygous for a loss of function mutation in Slc5a7 (HET, CHT(+/-)), but significantly elevated in overexpressing, Slc5a7 BAC-transgenic mice (BAC). Since the readily-releasable pool of ACh is thought to constitute a small fraction of the total ACh pool, these genotype-dependent changes raised the question as to whether CHT expression or activity might preferentially influence the size of reserve pool ACh vesicles. In the current study, we approached this question by evaluating CHT genotype effects on the release of ACh from suprafused mouse forebrain slices. We treated slices from HET, BAC or wildtype (WT) controls with elevated K(+) and monitored release of both newly synthesized and storage pools of ACh. Newly synthesized ACh produced following uptake of [(3)H]choline was quantified by scintillation spectrometry whereas release of endogenous ACh storage pools was quantified by an HPLC-MS approach, from the same samples. Whereas endogenous ACh release scaled with CHT gene dosage, preloaded [(3)H]ACh release displayed no significant genotype dependence. Our findings suggest that CHT protein levels preferentially impact the capacity for ACh release afforded by mobilization of reserve pool vesicles.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Epidermis-Derived Semaphorin Promotes Dendrite Self-Avoidance by Regulating Dendrite-Substrate Adhesion in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.
Meltzer S, Yadav S, Lee J, Soba P, Younger SH, Jin P, Zhang W, Parrish J, Jan LY, Jan YN
(2016) Neuron 89: 741-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Cell Communication, Dendrites, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Epidermis, Focal Adhesion Kinase 1, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Immunoprecipitation, Larva, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Molecular Biology, Multiprotein Complexes, Mutation, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Receptors, Cell Surface, Semaphorins, Sensory Receptor Cells, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added February 9, 2016
Precise patterning of dendritic arbors is critical for the wiring and function of neural circuits. Dendrite-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion ensures that the dendrites of Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) sensory neurons are properly restricted in a 2D space, and thereby facilitates contact-mediated dendritic self-avoidance and tiling. However, the mechanisms regulating dendrite-ECM adhesion in vivo are poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in the semaphorin ligand sema-2b lead to a dramatic increase in self-crossing of dendrites due to defects in dendrite-ECM adhesion, resulting in a failure to confine dendrites to a 2D plane. Furthermore, we find that Sema-2b is secreted from the epidermis and signals through the Plexin B receptor in neighboring neurons. Importantly, we find that Sema-2b/PlexB genetically and physically interacts with TORC2 complex, Tricornered (Trc) kinase, and integrins. These results reveal a novel role for semaphorins in dendrite patterning and illustrate how epidermal-derived cues regulate neural circuit assembly.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
22 MeSH Terms
Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.
Doll CA, Broadie K
(2016) Neurobiol Dis 89: 76-87
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Calcium Signaling, Cholinergic Neurons, Critical Period (Psychology), Disease Models, Animal, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein, GABAergic Neurons, Gene Knockout Techniques, Learning, Memory, Mushroom Bodies, Neurons
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early-use critical period.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Glucagon receptor inactivation leads to α-cell hyperplasia in zebrafish.
Li M, Dean ED, Zhao L, Nicholson WE, Powers AC, Chen W
(2015) J Endocrinol 227: 93-103
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Cell Proliferation, Cloning, Molecular, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Silencing, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Hyperplasia, Receptors, Glucagon, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2016
Glucagon antagonism is a potential treatment for diabetes. One potential side effect is α-cell hyperplasia, which has been noted in several approaches to antagonize glucagon action. To investigate the molecular mechanism of the α-cell hyperplasia and to identify the responsible factor, we created a zebrafish model in which glucagon receptor (gcgr) signaling has been interrupted. The genetically and chemically tractable zebrafish, which provides a robust discovery platform, has two gcgr genes (gcgra and gcgrb) in its genome. Sequence, phylogenetic, and synteny analyses suggest that these are co-orthologs of the human GCGR. Similar to its mammalian counterparts, gcgra and gcgrb are mainly expressed in the liver. We inactivated the zebrafish gcgra and gcgrb using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) first individually and then both genes, and assessed the number of α-cells using an α-cell reporter line, Tg(gcga:GFP). Compared to WT fish at 7 days postfertilization, there were more α-cells in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish and there was an increased rate of α-cell proliferation in the gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish. Glucagon levels were higher but free glucose levels were lower in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish, similar to Gcgr-/- mice. These results indicate that the compensatory α-cell hyperplasia in response to interruption of glucagon signaling is conserved in zebrafish. The robust α-cell hyperplasia in gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- larvae provides a platform to screen for chemical and genetic suppressors, and ultimately to identify the stimulus of α-cell hyperplasia and its signaling mechanism.
© 2015 Society for Endocrinology.
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3 Members
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11 MeSH Terms