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Clustering of end-organ disease and earlier mortality in adults with sickle cell disease: A retrospective-prospective cohort study.
Chaturvedi S, Ghafuri DL, Jordan N, Kassim A, Rodeghier M, DeBaun MR
(2018) Am J Hematol 93: 1153-1160
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cluster Analysis, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Morbidity, Mortality, Multiple Organ Failure, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
Chronic end-organ complications result in morbidity and mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). In a retrospective-prospective cohort of 150 adults with SCD who received standard care screening for pulmonary function abnormalities, cardiac disease, and renal assessment from January 2003 to 2016, we tested the hypothesis that clustering of end-organ disease is common and multiple organ impairment predicts mortality. Any end-organ disease occurred in 59.3% of individuals, and 24.0% developed multiple organ (>1) end-organ disease. The number of end-organs affected was associated with mortality (P ≤ .001); 8.2% (5 of 61) of individuals with no affected end-organ, 9.4% (5 of 53) of those with 1 affected organ, 20.7% (6 of 29) of those with 2 affected end-organs, and 85.7% (6 of 7) with 3 affected end-organs died over a median follow up period of 8.7 (interquartile range 3.5-11.4) years. Of the 22 individuals who died, 77.3% had evidence of any SCD-related end-organ impairment, and this was the primary or secondary cause of death in 45.0%. SCD-related chronic impairment in multiple organs, and its association with mortality, highlights the need to understand the common mechanisms underlying chronic end-organ damage in SCD, and the urgent need to develop interventions to prevent irreversible end-organ complications in SCD.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Fertility challenges for women with sickle cell disease.
Ghafuri DL, Stimpson SJ, Day ME, James A, DeBaun MR, Sharma D
(2017) Expert Rev Hematol 10: 891-901
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Sickle Cell, Blood Transfusion, Chronic Pain, Female, Fertility, Fertility Preservation, Genetic Therapy, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Hydroxyurea, Infertility, Pregnancy, Primary Ovarian Insufficiency, Reproductive Health, Transplantation Conditioning
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Sickle cell disease (SCD) represents one of the most common monogenic blood disorders worldwide, with an incidence of over 300,000 newborns affected per year. Reproductive challenges for men and women with SCD have been previously reviewed; however, evidence-based strategies to prevent and manage infertility and increase fecundity are lacking in women with SCD, which is one of the most important factors for quality of life. Areas covered: This review article summarizes the known risk factors for infertility, low fecundity, and premature menopause related to SCD. Expert commentary: Women with SCD have unique risk factors that may impact their ability to conceive, including chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, transfusion-related hemochromatosis, and ovarian sickling, causing ischemia and reperfusion injury to the ovary. Contraception is strongly recommended while on hydroxyurea therapy during reproductive years and discontinuing hydroxyurea for family planning and during pregnancy based on teratogenicity in animal studies. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the only curative therapy, sometimes involves conditioning regimens containing alkylating agents and total body irradiation that contribute to infertility and premature ovarian failure. Prior to HSCT or gene therapy, we strongly recommend referral to a reproductive endocrinologist to discuss fertility preservation and surrogacy options for all women with SCD.
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MeSH Terms
Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Establishing Standards in Practice.
Beckermann KE, Sharma D, Chaturvedi S, Msaouel P, Abboud MR, Allory Y, Bourdeaut F, Calderaro J, de Cubas AA, Derebail VK, Hong AL, Naik RP, Malouf GG, Mullen EA, Reuter VE, Roberts CWM, Walker CL, Wood CG, DeBaun MR, Van Poppel H, Tannir NM, Rathmell WK
(2017) J Oncol Pract 13: 414-421
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Sickle Cell, Carcinoma, Medullary, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Registries
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2017
Although renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare subtype of kidney cancer, it is particularly devastating in that it is nearly uniformly lethal. No established guidelines exist for the diagnosis and management of RMC. In April 2016, a panel of experts developed clinical guidelines on the basis of a literature review and consensus statements. The goal was to propose recommendations for standardized diagnostic and management approaches and to establish an international clinical registry and biorepository for RMC. Published data are limited to case reports and small retrospective reviews. The RMC Working Group prepared recommendations to inform providers and patients faced with a low level of medical evidence. The diagnosis of RMC should be considered in all patients younger than 50 years with poorly differentiated carcinoma that arises from the renal medulla. These patients should be tested for sickle cell hemoglobinopathies, and if positive, SMARCB1/INI1 loss should be confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The majority of patients with RMC are diagnosed with metastatic disease. Upfront radical nephrectomy should be considered in patients with good performance status and low metastatic burden or after response to systemic therapy. Currently, cytotoxic, platinum-based chemotherapy provides the best, albeit brief, palliative clinical benefit. Vascular endothelial growth factor-directed therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are ineffective in RMC as monotherapy. Therapeutic trials of novel agents are now available for RMC, and every effort should be made to enroll patients in clinical studies.
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6 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study to identify variants associated with acute severe vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell anemia.
Chaturvedi S, Bhatnagar P, Bean CJ, Steinberg MH, Milton JN, Casella JF, Barron-Casella E, Arking DE, DeBaun MR
(2017) Blood 130: 686-688
MeSH Terms: Acute Pain, Adolescent, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Epistasis, Genetic, Female, Fetal Hemoglobin, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Male, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies
Added June 7, 2017
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19 MeSH Terms
Feasibility trial for primary stroke prevention in children with sickle cell anemia in Nigeria (SPIN trial).
Galadanci NA, Umar Abdullahi S, Vance LD, Musa Tabari A, Ali S, Belonwu R, Salihu A, Amal Galadanci A, Wudil Jibir B, Bello-Manga H, Neville K, Kirkham FJ, Shyr Y, Phillips S, Covert BV, Kassim AA, Jordan LC, Aliyu MH, DeBaun MR
(2017) Am J Hematol 92: 780-788
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Sickle Cell, Antisickling Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization, Humans, Hydroxyurea, Incidence, Male, Medication Adherence, Nigeria, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Stroke, Treatment Outcome, Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Show Abstract · Added April 27, 2017
The vast majority of children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) live in Africa, where evidence-based guidelines for primary stroke prevention are lacking. In Kano, Nigeria, we conducted a feasibility trial to determine the acceptability of hydroxyurea therapy for primary stroke prevention in children with abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) measurements. Children with SCA and abnormal non-imaging TCD measurements (≥200 cm/s) received moderate fixed-dose hydroxyurea therapy (∼20 mg/kg/day). A comparison group of children with TCD measurements <200 cm/s was followed prospectively. Approximately 88% (330 of 375) of families agreed to be screened, while 87% (29 of 33) of those with abnormal TCD measurements, enrolled in the trial. No participant elected to withdraw from the trial. The average mean corpuscular volume increased from 85.7 fl at baseline to 95.5 fl at 24 months (not all of the children who crossed over had a 24 month visit), demonstrating adherence to hydroxyurea. The comparison group consisted of initially 210 children, of which four developed abnormal TCD measurements, and were started on hydroxyurea. None of the monthly research visits were missed (n = total 603 visits). Two and 10 deaths occurred in the treatment and comparison groups, with mortality rates of 2.69 and 1.81 per 100 patient-years, respectively (P = .67). Our results provide strong evidence, for high family recruitment, retention, and adherence rates, to undertake the first randomized controlled trial with hydroxyurea therapy for primary stroke prevention in children with SCA living in Africa.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
'It means everyone should know their status': exploring lay conceptions of sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening among African Americans within middle reproductive age.
Mayo-Gamble TL, Barnes PA, Cunningham Erves J, Middlestadt SE, Lin HC
(2018) Ethn Health 23: 813-829
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Decision Making, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Indiana, Male, Mass Screening, Reproductive Health, Sickle Cell Trait, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2017
OBJECTIVE - This study examined the meaning of sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening from the lay perspective of African Americans.
DESIGN AND METHODS - African Americans (N = 300), ages 18-35 and unaware of their sickle cell trait status, completed two open-ended questions from a larger survey. One question asked for their understanding of sickle cell trait; the other asked for their understanding of sickle cell trait screening. Content analysis occurred in two phases: (1) In vivo and holistic coding; and (2) focused coding.
RESULTS - Four categories emerged illustrating lay conceptions of sickle cell trait; (1) Perceived as an illness; (2) Perceived recognition of the inheritance pattern of sickle cell trait; (3) Perceived lack of knowledge of sickle cell trait; and (4) Perceived importance of sickle cell trait. Five categories emerged illustrating lay conceptions for sickle cell trait screening: (1) Perceived recognition that screening means getting tested for sickle cell trait; (2) Perceived lack of knowledge of sickle cell trait screening; (3) Perceived health benefit of sickle cell trait screening; (4) Perceived importance of sickle cell trait screening; and (5) Perceived barriers to sickle cell trait screening.
CONCLUSIONS - Sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening are concepts that are both regarded as important among this high-risk population. However, there is still misunderstanding concerning the hereditary nature and reproductive implications of sickle cell trait. Interventions seeking to improve communication on the need for sickle cell trait screening should begin by identifying what the population at large understands, knows and/or believes to improve their ability to make informed health decisions.
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13 MeSH Terms
Risk Factors for 30-Day Readmission in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.
Brodsky MA, Rodeghier M, Sanger M, Byrd J, McClain B, Covert B, Roberts DO, Wilkerson K, DeBaun MR, Kassim AA
(2017) Am J Med 130: 601.e9-601.e15
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Readmission, Primary Health Care, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 10, 2017
BACKGROUND - Readmission to the hospital within 30 days is a measure of quality care; however, only few modifiable risk factors for 30-day readmission in adults with sickle cell disease are known.
METHODS - We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of adults with sickle cell disease at a tertiary care center, to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for 30-day readmission due to vasoocclusive pain episodes. A total of 88 patients ≥18 years of age were followed for 3.5 years between 2010 and 2013, for 158 first admissions for vasoocclusive pain episodes. Of these, those subsequently readmitted (cases) or not readmitted (controls) within 30 days of their index admissions were identified. Seven risk factors were included in a multivariable model to predict readmission: age, sex, hemoglobin phenotype, median oxygen saturation level, listing of primary care provider, type of health insurance, and number of hospitalized vasoocclusive pain episodes in the prior year.
RESULTS - Mean age at admission was 31.7 (18-59) years; median time to readmission was 11 days (interquartile range 20 days). Absence of a primary care provider listed in the electronic medical record (odds ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.91; P = .030) and the number of vasoocclusive pain episodes requiring hospitalization in the prior year were significant risk factors for 30-day readmission (odds ratio 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.44; P <.001).
CONCLUSION - Improved discharge planning and ensuring access to a primary care provider may decrease the 30-day readmission rate in adults with sickle cell disease.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Secondary benefit of maintaining normal transcranial Doppler velocities when using hydroxyurea for prevention of severe sickle cell anemia.
Ghafuri DL, Chaturvedi S, Rodeghier M, Stimpson SJ, McClain B, Byrd J, DeBaun MR
(2017) Pediatr Blood Cancer 64:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Antisickling Agents, Blood Flow Velocity, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Hydroxyurea, Male, Retrospective Studies, Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Show Abstract · Added January 2, 2017
In a retrospective cohort study, we tested the hypothesis that when prescribing hydroxyurea (HU) to children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) to prevent vaso-occlusive events, there will be a secondary benefit of maintaining low transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocity, measured by imaging technique (TCDi). HU was prescribed for 90.9% (110 of 120) of children with SCA ≥5 years of age and followed for a median of 4.4 years, with 70% (n = 77) receiving at least one TCDi evaluation after starting HU. No child prescribed HU had a conditional or abnormal TCDi measurement. HU initiation for disease severity prevention decreases the prevalence of abnormal TCDi velocities.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Hemodynamic mechanisms underlying elevated oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in moyamoya and sickle cell anemia patients.
Watchmaker JM, Juttukonda MR, Davis LT, Scott AO, Faraco CC, Gindville MC, Jordan LC, Cogswell PM, Jefferson AL, Kirshner HS, Donahue MJ
(2018) J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 38: 1618-1630
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Female, Hemodynamics, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Moyamoya Disease, Oxygen, Oxygen Consumption
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Moyamoya is a bilateral, complex cerebrovascular condition characterized by progressive non-atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis and collateral vessel formation. Moyamoya treatment focuses on restoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) through surgical revascularization, however stratifying patients for revascularization requires abilities to quantify how well parenchyma is compensating for arterial steno-occlusion. Globally elevated oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) secondary to CBF reduction may serve as a biomarker for tissue health in moyamoya patients, as suggested in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and reduced oxygen carrying capacity. Here, OEF was measured (TRUST-MRI) to test the hypothesis that OEF is globally elevated in patients with moyamoya (n = 18) and SCA (n = 18) relative to age-matched controls (n = 43). Mechanisms underlying the hypothesized OEF increases were evaluated by performing sequential CBF-weighted, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)-weighted, and structural MRI. Patients were stratified by treatment and non-parametric tests applied to compare study variables (significance: two-sided P < 0.05). OEF was significantly elevated in moyamoya participants (interquartile range = 0.38-0.45) compared to controls (interquartile range = 0.29-0.38), similar to participants with SCA (interquartile range = 0.37-0.45). CBF was inversely correlated with OEF in moyamoya participants. Elevated OEF was only weakly related to reductions in CVR, consistent with basal CBF level, rather than vascular reserve capacity, being most closely associated with OEF.
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13 MeSH Terms
Elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity, reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and mortality in adults with sickle cell disease.
Chaturvedi S, Labib Ghafuri D, Kassim A, Rodeghier M, DeBaun MR
(2017) Am J Hematol 92: 125-130
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cohort Studies, Echocardiography, Female, Forced Expiratory Volume, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Pulmonary Heart Disease, Respiratory Function Tests, Retrospective Studies, Survival Rate, Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency
Show Abstract · Added November 7, 2016
Cardiopulmonary disease is the leading cause of mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRJV) and reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV ) %predicted are associated with early mortality in SCD; however their relationship and combined effect on survival is unknown. We investigated the relationship between TRJV and FEV %predicted, and their combined effect on mortality, in a retrospective cohort of 189 adults with SCD who underwent both pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. Nineteen (9.9%) of 189 patients died over a median follow-up of 1.4 years; cardiopulmonary disease was the major cause of death in 52.6%. FEV %predicted was negatively associated with TRJV (Spearman rho, -0.34, P < 0.001). Individuals with FEV %predicted ≤70% were more likely to have an elevated TRJV ≥2.5 m/second, compared to those with FEV %predicted >70% [45.8% versus 17.1%; odds ratio (OR) 4.1 (95% Confidence interval ([CI] 2.1-8.0); P = 0.001]. In a multivariable cox regression model, the combination of TRJV ≥2.5 m/second and FEV %predicted ≤70% predicted earlier mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 4.97 (95% CI 1.30-18.91; P = 0.019)] after adjusting for age, sex, and nephropathy. Both FEV %predicted ≤70% and TRJV ≥2.5 m/second were independently associated with nephropathy [OR 4.48 (95% CI 1.51-13.31); P = 0.004] and [OR 3.27 (95% CI 1.19-9.00); P = 0.017], respectively. In conclusion, pulmonary and cardiac impairment are associated with, and contribute to mortality in SCD. Therapies aimed at improving reduced FEV %predicted and elevated TRJV could improve survival in patients with SCD. Am. J. Hematol. 92:125-130, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms