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Does Diverting Loop Ileostomy Improve Outcomes Following Open Ileo-Colic Anastomoses? A Nationwide Analysis.
Hawkins AT, Dharmarajan S, Wells KK, Krishnamurty DM, Mutch MG, Glasgow SC
(2016) J Gastrointest Surg 20: 1738-43
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anastomosis, Surgical, Anastomotic Leak, Colon, Digestive System Surgical Procedures, Female, Humans, Ileostomy, Ileum, Male, Middle Aged, Reoperation, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added September 27, 2016
BACKGROUND - Anastomotic leak is one of the most feared complications of gastrointestinal surgery. Surgeons routinely perform a diverting loop ileostomy (DLI) to protect high-risk colo-rectal anastomoses.
STUDY DESIGN - The NSQIP database was queried from 2012 to 2013 for patients undergoing open ileo-colic resection with and without a DLI. The primary outcome was the development of any anastomotic leak-including those managed operatively and non-operatively. Secondary outcomes included overall complication rate, return to the OR, readmission, and 30-day mortality.
RESULTS - Four thousand one hundred fifty-nine patients underwent open ileo-colic resection during the study period. One hundred eighty-six (4.5 %) underwent a DLI. Factors associated with the addition of a DLI included emergency surgery, pre-operative sepsis, and IBD. There were 197 anastomotic leaks (4.7 %) with 100 patients requiring reoperation (2.4 %). DLI was associated with a decrease in anastomotic leaks requiring reoperation (DLI vs no DLI: 0 (0 %) vs 100 (2.5 %); p = 0.02) and with increased readmission (OR 1.93; 95 % CI 1.30-2.85; p = 0.001).
CONCLUSION - DLI is rarely used for open ileo-colic resection. There were no serious leaks requiring reoperation in the DLI group. A DLI was associated with an almost two-fold increase in the odds of readmission. Surgeons must weigh the reduction in serious leak rate with postoperative morbidity when considering a DLI for open ileo-colic resection.
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15 MeSH Terms
Cost benefit analysis of mesh reinforcement of stapled left pancreatectomy.
Idrees K, Edler JR, Linehan DC, Strasberg SM, Jacques D, Hamilton NA, Fields RC, Lambert D, Kymes S, Hawkins WG
(2013) HPB (Oxford) 15: 893-8
MeSH Terms: Anastomosis, Surgical, Anastomotic Leak, Cost of Illness, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Humans, Pancreas, Pancreatectomy, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies, Single-Blind Method, Surgical Mesh, Surgical Stapling, Suture Techniques, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Pancreatic leak is a morbid complication following left pancreatectomy, which results in prolonged hospitalization, additional diagnostic testing and invasive procedures. The present authors have previously demonstrated that mesh reinforcement of stapled left pancreatectomy results in fewer pancreatic leaks. This study was conducted to investigate whether mesh reinforcement also results in cost benefits for the health care system.
METHODS - A cost benefit model was developed to estimate net cost savings from the payer's perspective. The model is based on the results of a randomized, single-blinded trial of mesh versus no mesh reinforcement of the pancreatic remnant after left pancreatectomy. A two-way sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the model's sensitivity to fluctuations in the cost of mesh and the effectiveness of the mesh in reducing clinically significant leaks.
RESULTS - Average total costs for an episode of care were US$13 337 and US$15 505 for patients who did and did not receive mesh, respectively, which indicates savings of US$2168. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that, given a probability of 1.9% for developing a clinically significant leak in patients in whom mesh reinforcement was used, the strategy would continue to save costs if mesh were priced at ≤US$1804.
CONCLUSIONS - Mesh reinforcement decreases clinically significant pancreatic leaks. Despite the additional cost of mesh reinforcement, the use of mesh reinforcement results in overall cost savings for the health care system because of the resultant decrease in the occurrence of clinically significant leaks.
© 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.
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15 MeSH Terms