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Quantification of thioether-linked glutathione modifications in human lens proteins.
Wang Z, Schey KL
(2018) Exp Eye Res 175: 83-89
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Alanine, Aminobutyrates, Cataract, Cellular Senescence, Chromatography, Liquid, Crystallins, Cysteine, Glutathione, Humans, Lens, Crystalline, Middle Aged, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Serine, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Sulfides, Threonine, Tissue Donors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 4, 2019
Dehydroalanine (DHA) and dehydrobutyrine (DHB) intermediates, formed through β-elimination, induce protein irreversible glutathionylation and protein-protein crosslinking in human lens fiber cells. In total, irreversible glutathionylation was detected on 52 sites including cysteine, serine and threonine residues in 18 proteins in human lenses. In this study, the levels of GSH modification on three serine residues and four cysteine residues located in seven different lens proteins isolated from different regions and different aged lenses were quantified. The relative levels of modification (modified/nonmodified) were site-specific and age-related, ranging from less than 0.05% to about 500%. The levels of modification on all of the sites quantified in the lens cortex increased with age and GSH modification also increased from cortex to outer nucleus region suggesting an age-related increase of modification. The levels of modification on sites located in stable regions of the proteins such as Cys117 of βA3, Cys80 of βB1 and Cys27 of γS, continued increasing in inner nucleus, but modification on sites located in regions undergoing degradation with age decreased in the inner nucleus suggesting GSH modified proteins were more susceptible to further modification. Irreversible GSH modification in cataract lenses was typically higher than in age-matched normal lenses, but the difference did not reach statistical significance for a majority of sites, with the exception Cys117 of βA3 crystallin in WSF. Except for S59 of αA and αB crystallins, GSH modification did not induce protein insolubility suggesting a possible role for this modification in protection from protein-protein crosslinking.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Response by Hubers and Brown to Letter Regarding Article, "Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition".
Hubers SA, Brown NJ
(2016) Circulation 134: e11-2
MeSH Terms: Aminobutyrates, Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Heart Failure, Humans, Neprilysin, Receptors, Angiotensin, Tetrazoles
Added April 6, 2017
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8 MeSH Terms
Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.
Hubers SA, Brown NJ
(2016) Circulation 133: 1115-24
MeSH Terms: Abnormalities, Drug-Induced, Aminobutyrates, Angioedema, Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists, Biphenyl Compounds, Bradykinin, Contraindications, Drug Combinations, Drug Costs, Drug Synergism, Enalapril, Enzyme Inhibitors, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Failure, Humans, Hyperkalemia, Hypertension, Kidney, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Natriuretic Peptides, Neprilysin, Pregnancy, Prodrugs, Prospective Studies, Pyridines, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Stroke Volume, Tetrazoles, Thiazepines, Valsartan
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
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31 MeSH Terms
Pharmacological stimulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 4 in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Comparison between a positive allosteric modulator and an orthosteric agonist.
Iderberg H, Maslava N, Thompson AD, Bubser M, Niswender CM, Hopkins CR, Lindsley CW, Conn PJ, Jones CK, Cenci MA
(2015) Neuropharmacology 95: 121-9
MeSH Terms: Aminobutyrates, Animals, Antiparkinson Agents, Catalepsy, Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced, Excitatory Amino Acid Agents, Haloperidol, Levodopa, Male, Oxidopamine, Parkinsonian Disorders, Phosphinic Acids, Picolinic Acids, Random Allocation, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4) negatively modulates GABA and glutamate release in the 'indirect pathway' of the basal ganglia, and has thus been proposed as a potential target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Here, we present an extensive comparison of the behavioural effects produced by the mGlu4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0364770, and the mGlu4 orthosteric agonist, LSP1-2111, in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. The compounds' activity was initially assessed in a test of haloperidol-induced catalepsy in intact rats, and effective doses were then evaluated in the hemiparkinsonian animal model. Neither of the two compounds modified the development of dyskinetic behaviours elicited by chronic treatment with full doses of l-DOPA. When given together with l-DOPA to rats with already established dyskinesias, neither VU0364770 nor LSP1-2111 modified the abnormal involuntary movement scores. VU0364770 potentiated, however, the motor stimulant effect of a subthreshold l-DOPA dose in certain behavioural tests, whereas LSP1-2111 lacked this ability. Taken together, these results indicate that a pharmacological stimulation of mGlu4 lacks intrinsic antidyskinetic activity, but may have DOPA-sparing activity in Parkinson's disease. For the latter indication, mGlu4 PAMs appear to provide a better option than orthosteric agonists.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Impaired systolic function by strain imaging in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.
Kraigher-Krainer E, Shah AM, Gupta DK, Santos A, Claggett B, Pieske B, Zile MR, Voors AA, Lefkowitz MP, Packer M, McMurray JJ, Solomon SD, PARAMOUNT Investigators
(2014) J Am Coll Cardiol 63: 447-56
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aminobutyrates, Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Echocardiography, Doppler, Color, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Failure, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neprilysin, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Stroke Volume, Tetrazoles, Valine, Valsartan, Ventricular Function, Left
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
OBJECTIVES - This study sought to determine the frequency and magnitude of impaired systolic deformation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).
BACKGROUND - Although diastolic dysfunction is widely considered a key pathophysiologic mediator of HFpEF, the prevalence of concomitant systolic dysfunction has not been clearly defined.
METHODS - We assessed myocardial systolic and diastolic function in 219 HFpEF patients from a contemporary HFpEF clinical trial. Myocardial deformation was assessed using a vendor-independent 2-dimensional speckle-tracking software. The frequency and severity of impaired deformation was assessed in HFpEF, and compared to 50 normal controls free of cardiovascular disease and to 44 age- and sex-matched hypertensive patients with diastolic dysfunction (hypertensive heart disease) but no HF. Among HFpEF patients, clinical, echocardiographic, and biomarker correlates of left ventricular strain were determined.
RESULTS - The HFpEF patients had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and evidence of diastolic dysfunction. Compared to both normal controls and hypertensive heart disease patients, the HFpEF patients demonstrated significantly lower longitudinal strain (LS) (-20.0 ± 2.1 and -17.07 ± 2.04 vs. -14.6 ± 3.3, respectively, p < 0.0001 for both) and circumferential strain (CS) (-27.1 ± 3.1 and -30.1 ± 3.5 vs. -22.9 ± 5.9, respectively; p < 0.0001 for both). In HFpEF, both LS and CS were related to LVEF (LS, R = -0.46; p < 0.0001; CS, R = -0.51; p < 0.0001) but not to standard echocardiographic measures of diastolic function (E' or E/E'). Lower LS was modestly associated with higher NT-proBNP, even after adjustment for 10 baseline covariates including LVEF, measures of diastolic function, and LV filling pressure (multivariable adjusted p = 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS - Strain imaging detects impaired systolic function despite preserved global LVEF in HFpEF that may contribute to the pathophysiology of the HFpEF syndrome. (LCZ696 Compared to Valsartan in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and Preserved Left-ventricular Ejection Fraction; NCT00887588).
Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Human protein aging: modification and crosslinking through dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine intermediates.
Wang Z, Lyons B, Truscott RJ, Schey KL
(2014) Aging Cell 13: 226-34
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, 80 and over, Alanine, Amino Acid Sequence, Aminobutyrates, Cell Nucleus, Cross-Linking Reagents, Crystallins, Glutathione, Humans, Lens, Crystalline, Middle Aged, Molecular Sequence Data, Peptides, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Serine, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Threonine, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Nonenzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is a fundamental molecular process of aging. The combination of various modifications and their accumulation with age not only affects function, but leads to crosslinking and protein aggregation. In this study, aged human lens proteins were examined using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and a blind PTM search strategy. Multiple thioether modifications of Ser and Thr residues by glutathione (GSH) and its metabolites were unambiguously identified. Thirty-four of 36 sites identified on 15 proteins were found on known phosphorylation sites, supporting a mechanism involving dehydroalanine (DHA) and dehydrobutyrine (DHB) formation through β-elimination of phosphoric acid from phosphoserine and phosphothreonine with subsequent nucleophilic attack by GSH. In vitro incubations of phosphopeptides demonstrated that this process can occur spontaneously under physiological conditions. Evidence that this mechanism can also lead to protein-protein crosslinks within cells is provided where five crosslinked peptides were detected in a human cataractous lens. Nondisulfide crosslinks were identified for the first time in lens tissue between βB2- & βB2-, βA4- & βA3-, γS- & βB1-, and βA4- & βA4-crystallins and provide detailed structural information on in vivo crystallin complexes. These data suggest that phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues represent susceptible sites for spontaneous breakdown in long-lived proteins and that DHA- and DHB-mediated protein crosslinking may be the source of the long-sought after nondisulfide protein aggregates believed to scatter light in cataractous lenses. Furthermore, this mechanism may be a common aging process that occurs in long-lived proteins of other tissues leading to protein aggregation diseases.
© 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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19 MeSH Terms
The metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 agonist (S)-3,4-DCPG reverses motor deficits in prolonged but not acute models of Parkinson's disease.
Johnson KA, Jones CK, Tantawy MN, Bubser M, Marvanova M, Ansari MS, Baldwin RM, Conn PJ, Niswender CM
(2013) Neuropharmacology 66: 187-95
MeSH Terms: Aminobutyrates, Animals, Benzoates, Catalepsy, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine, Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced, Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists, Forelimb, Glycine, Haloperidol, Injections, Intraventricular, Male, Neostriatum, Parkinsonian Disorders, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Reserpine, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are 7 Transmembrane Spanning Receptors (7TMs) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and modulate synaptic transmission at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Recently, mGlus have been implicated as therapeutic targets for many disorders of the central nervous system, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that nonselective agonists of group III mGlus have antiparkinsonian effects in several animal models of PD, suggesting that these receptors represent promising targets for treating the motor symptoms of PD. However, the relative contributions of different group III mGlu subtypes to these effects have not been fully elucidated. Here we report that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the mGlu(8)-selective agonist (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine (DCPG [ 2.5, 10, or 30 nmol]) does not alleviate motor deficits caused by acute (2 h) treatment with haloperidol or reserpine. However, following prolonged pretreatment with haloperidol (three doses evenly spaced over 18-20 h) or reserpine (18-20 h), DCPG robustly reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy and reserpine-induced akinesia. Furthermore, DCPG (10 nmol, icv) reverses the long-lasting catalepsy induced by 20 h pretreatment with the decanoate salt of haloperidol. Finally, icv administration of DCPG ameliorates forelimb use asymmetry caused by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of substantia nigra dopamine neurons. These findings suggest that mGlu(8) may partially mediate the antiparkinsonian effects of group III mGlu agonists in animal models of PD in which dopamine depletion or blockade of D(2)-like dopamine receptors is prolonged and indicate that selective activation of mGlu(8) may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for alleviating the motor symptoms of PD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Group III mGluR regulation of synaptic transmission at the SC-CA1 synapse is developmentally regulated.
Ayala JE, Niswender CM, Luo Q, Banko JL, Conn PJ
(2008) Neuropharmacology 54: 804-14
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Amino Acids, Aminobutyrates, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cell Line, Transformed, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Hippocampus, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Male, Neural Pathways, Neurons, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, AMPA, Synapses, Synaptic Transmission, Transfection, Xanthenes
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) reduce synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 (SC-CA1) synapse in rats by a presynaptic mechanism. Previous studies show that low concentrations of the group III-selective agonist, L-AP4, reduce synaptic transmission in slices from neonatal but not adult rats, whereas high micromolar concentrations reduce transmission in both age groups. L-AP4 activates mGluRs 4 and 8 at much lower concentrations than those required to activate mGluR7, suggesting that the group III mGluR subtype modulating transmission is a high affinity receptor in neonates and a low affinity receptor in adults. The previous lack of subtype selective ligands has made it difficult to test this hypothesis. We have measured fEPSPs in the presence of novel subtype selective agents to address this question. We show that the effects of L-AP4 can be blocked by LY341495 in both neonates and adults, verifying that these effects are mediated by mGluRs. In addition, the selective mGluR8 agonist, DCPG, has a significant effect in slices from neonatal rats but does not reduce synaptic transmission in adult slices. The mGluR4 selective allosteric potentiator, PHCCC, is unable to potentiate the L-AP4-induced effects at either age. Taken together, our data suggest that group III mGluRs regulate transmission at the SC-CA1 synapse throughout development but there is a developmental regulation of the subtypes involved so that both mGluR7 and mGluR8 serve this role in neonates whereas mGluR7 is involved in regulating transmission at this synapse throughout postnatal development.
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23 MeSH Terms
Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat globus pallidus.
Poisik O, Raju DV, Verreault M, Rodriguez A, Abeniyi OA, Conn PJ, Smith Y
(2005) Neuropharmacology 49 Suppl 1: 57-69
MeSH Terms: 6-Cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, Amino Acids, Aminobutyrates, Anesthetics, Local, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cyclopropanes, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation, Drug Interactions, Electric Stimulation, Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Globus Pallidus, Glycine, In Vitro Techniques, Lidocaine, Membrane Potentials, Methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol, Neurons, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Proline, Pyridines, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, AMPA, Sulfonamides, Synaptic Transmission, Xanthenes
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
While group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are known to be expressed in the rat globus pallidus (GP), their functions remain poorly understood. We used standard patch clamping technique in GP slices to determine the effect of group II mGluR activation on excitatory transmission in this region. Activation of group II mGluRs with the group-selective agonist DCG-IV or APDC reduced the amplitude of the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and significantly increased the paired pulse ratio suggesting a presynaptic site of action. This was further supported by double-labeling electron microscopy data showing that group II mGluRs (mGluR2 and 3) immunoreactivity is localized in glutamatergic pre-terminal axons and terminals in the GP. Furthermore, we found that LY 487379, an mGluR2-specific allosteric modulator, significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of DCG-IV on the excitatory transmission in the GP. Co-incubation with 30 microM LY 487379 increased the potency of DCG-IV about 10-fold in the GP. We were thus able to pharmacologically isolate the mGluR2-mediated function in the rat GP using an mGluR2-specific allosteric modulator. Therefore, our findings do not only shed light on the functions of group II mGluRs in the GP, they also illustrate the therapeutic potential of mGluR-targeting allosteric modulators in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
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30 MeSH Terms
Group III metabotropic glutamate-receptor-mediated modulation of excitatory transmission in rodent substantia nigra pars compacta dopamine neurons.
Valenti O, Mannaioni G, Seabrook GR, Conn PJ, Marino MJ
(2005) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 313: 1296-304
MeSH Terms: Aminobutyrates, Animals, Dopamine, Mice, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Substantia Nigra, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Glutamate plays an important role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity. In particular, the glutamatergic input from the subthalamic nucleus is thought to provide control over dopamine neuron firing patterns. The degeneration of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) is believed to be due to a complex interplay of factors, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although glutamate is not the primary cause of cell death in PD, there is evidence suggesting excessive glutamate release onto dopamine neurons may play a role in continued degeneration. Although many studies have focused on the role of glutamate in the SNc, little work has been directed at exploring the modulatory control of glutamate release in this region. Previous studies have found a high-potency inhibitory effect of nonselective group III mGluR agonist on glutamatergic transmission in the SNc. Using whole-cell patch-clamp methods and novel pharmacological tools, we have determined that mGluR4 mediates the group III mGluR modulation of excitatory transmission in the rat SNc. The group III mGluR-selective agonist l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid inhibits excitatory transmission in the SNc at low micromolar concentrations with a maximal inhibition occurring at 3 muM. This effect was potentiated by the mGluR4-selective allosteric modulator N-phenyl-7-(hydroxymino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide and was not mimicked by the mGluR8-selective agonist (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine. Interestingly, in an attempt to employ knockout mice to confirm the role of mGluR4, we discovered an apparent species difference suggesting that in mice, both mGluR4 and mGluR8 modulate excitatory transmission in the SNc.
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9 MeSH Terms