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High frequency of shared clonotypes in human B cell receptor repertoires.
Soto C, Bombardi RG, Branchizio A, Kose N, Matta P, Sevy AM, Sinkovits RS, Gilchuk P, Finn JA, Crowe JE
(2019) Nature 566: 398-402
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Antigens, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Clone Cells, Female, Fetal Blood, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The human genome contains approximately 20 thousand protein-coding genes, but the size of the collection of antigen receptors of the adaptive immune system that is generated by the recombination of gene segments with non-templated junctional additions (on B cells) is unknown-although it is certainly orders of magnitude larger. It has not been established whether individuals possess unique (or private) repertoires or substantial components of shared (or public) repertoires. Here we sequence recombined and expressed B cell receptor genes in several individuals to determine the size of their B cell receptor repertoires, and the extent to which these are shared between individuals. Our experiments revealed that the circulating repertoire of each individual contained between 9 and 17 million B cell clonotypes. The three individuals that we studied shared many clonotypes, including between 1 and 6% of B cell heavy-chain clonotypes shared between two subjects (0.3% of clonotypes shared by all three) and 20 to 34% of λ or κ light chains shared between two subjects (16 or 22% of λ or κ light chains, respectively, were shared by all three). Some of the B cell clonotypes had thousands of clones, or somatic variants, within the clonotype lineage. Although some of these shared lineages might be driven by exposure to common antigens, previous exposure to foreign antigens was not the only force that shaped the shared repertoires, as we also identified shared clonotypes in umbilical cord blood samples and all adult repertoires. The unexpectedly high prevalence of shared clonotypes in B cell repertoires, and identification of the sequences of these shared clonotypes, should enable better understanding of the role of B cell immune repertoires in health and disease.
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15 MeSH Terms
Multistate design of influenza antibodies improves affinity and breadth against seasonal viruses.
Sevy AM, Wu NC, Gilchuk IM, Parrish EH, Burger S, Yousif D, Nagel MBM, Schey KL, Wilson IA, Crowe JE, Meiler J
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 1597-1602
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Crystallography, X-Ray, Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus, Humans, Influenza A virus, Influenza, Human, Seasons
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Influenza is a yearly threat to global public health. Rapid changes in influenza surface proteins resulting from antigenic drift and shift events make it difficult to readily identify antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against different influenza subtypes with high frequency, specifically antibodies targeting the receptor binding domain (RBD) on influenza HA protein. We developed an optimized computational design method that is able to optimize an antibody for recognition of large panels of antigens. To demonstrate the utility of this multistate design method, we used it to redesign an antiinfluenza antibody against a large panel of more than 500 seasonal HA antigens of the H1 subtype. As a proof of concept, we tested this method on a variety of known antiinfluenza antibodies and identified those that could be improved computationally. We generated redesigned variants of antibody C05 to the HA RBD and experimentally characterized variants that exhibited improved breadth and affinity against our panel. C05 mutants exhibited improved affinity for three of the subtypes used in design by stabilizing the CDRH3 loop and creating favorable electrostatic interactions with the antigen. These mutants possess increased breadth and affinity of binding while maintaining high-affinity binding to existing targets, surpassing a major limitation up to this point.
Copyright © 2019 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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The Structure of the Bifunctional Everninomicin Biosynthetic Enzyme EvdMO1 Suggests Independent Activity of the Fused Methyltransferase-Oxidase Domains.
Starbird CA, Perry NA, Chen Q, Berndt S, Yamakawa I, Loukachevitch LV, Limbrick EM, Bachmann BO, Iverson TM, McCulloch KM
(2018) Biochemistry 57: 6827-6837
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Aminoglycosides, Bacterial Proteins, Biosynthetic Pathways, Catalytic Domain, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Fusion, Genes, Bacterial, Methyltransferases, Micromonospora, Models, Molecular, Oxygenases, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Members of the orthosomycin family of natural products are decorated polysaccharides with potent antibiotic activity and complex biosynthetic pathways. The defining feature of the orthosomycins is an orthoester linkage between carbohydrate moieties that is necessary for antibiotic activity and is likely formed by a family of conserved oxygenases. Everninomicins are octasaccharide orthosomycins produced by Micromonospora carbonacea that have two orthoester linkages and a methylenedioxy bridge, three features whose formation logically requires oxidative chemistry. Correspondingly, the evd gene cluster encoding everninomicin D encodes two monofunctional nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases and one bifunctional enzyme with an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal oxygenase domain. To investigate whether the activities of these domains are linked in the bifunctional enzyme EvdMO1, we determined the structure of the N-terminal methyltransferase domain to 1.1 Å and that of the full-length protein to 3.35 Å resolution. Both domains of EvdMO1 adopt the canonical folds of their respective superfamilies and are connected by a short linker. Each domain's active site is oriented such that it faces away from the other domain, and there is no evidence of a channel connecting the two. Our results support EvdMO1 working as a bifunctional enzyme with independent catalytic activities.
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15 MeSH Terms
Spontaneous cross-linking of proteins at aspartate and asparagine residues is mediated via a succinimide intermediate.
Friedrich MG, Wang Z, Schey KL, Truscott RJW
(2018) Biochem J 475: 3189-3200
MeSH Terms: Aged, Amino Acid Sequence, Asparagine, Aspartic Acid, Humans, Lens, Crystalline, Succinimides
Show Abstract · Added April 4, 2019
The breakdown of long-lived proteins (LLPs) is associated with aging, as well as disease; however, our understanding of the molecular processes involved is still limited. Of particular relevance, cross-linked proteins are often reported in aged tissues but the mechanisms for their formation are poorly understood. In the present study, sites of protein cross-linking in human ocular lenses were characterized using proteomic techniques. In long-lived lens proteins, several sites of cross-linking were found to involve the addition of Lys to Asp or Asn residues. Using model peptides containing Asp or Asn, a mechanism was elucidated that involves a succinimide intermediate. Succinimides formed readily from Asn at neutral pH, whereas a higher rate of formation from Asp peptides was observed at more acidic pHs. Succinimides were found to be relatively stable in the absence of nucleophiles. Since racemization of Asp residues, as well as deamidation of Asn, involves a succinimide intermediate, sites of d-Asp and isoAsp in LLPs should also be considered as potential sites of protein covalent cross-linking.
© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.
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7 MeSH Terms
De novo designed transmembrane peptides activating the α5β1 integrin.
Mravic M, Hu H, Lu Z, Bennett JS, Sanders CR, Orr AW, DeGrado WF
(2018) Protein Eng Des Sel 31: 181-190
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Cell Membrane, Computer-Aided Design, Drug Design, Humans, Integrin alpha5beta1, Micelles, Peptides, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Domains
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
Computationally designed transmembrane α-helical peptides (CHAMP) have been used to compete for helix-helix interactions within the membrane, enabling the ability to probe the activation of the integrins αIIbβ3 and αvβ3. Here, this method is extended towards the design of CHAMP peptides that inhibit the association of the α5β1 transmembrane (TM) domains, targeting the Ala-X3-Gly motif within α5. Our previous design algorithm was performed alongside a new workflow implemented within the widely used Rosetta molecular modeling suite. Peptides from each computational approach activated integrin α5β1 but not αVβ3 in human endothelial cells. Two CHAMP peptides were shown to directly associate with an α5 TM domain peptide in detergent micelles to a similar degree as a β1 TM peptide does. By solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance, one of these CHAMP peptides was shown to bind primarily the integrin β1 TM domain, which itself has a Gly-X3-Gly motif. The second peptide associated modestly with both α5 and β1 constructs, with slight preference for α5. Although the design goal was not fully realized, this work characterizes novel CHAMP peptides activating α5β1 that can serve as useful reagents for probing integrin biology.
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10 MeSH Terms
Structural and Functional Features of the Reovirus σ1 Tail.
Dietrich MH, Ogden KM, Long JM, Ebenhoch R, Thor A, Dermody TS, Stehle T
(2018) J Virol 92:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Capsid Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Crystallography, X-Ray, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Receptors, Virus, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Sequence Homology, Virus Attachment, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Mammalian orthoreovirus attachment to target cells is mediated by the outer capsid protein σ1, which projects from the virion surface. The σ1 protein is a homotrimer consisting of a filamentous tail, which is partly inserted into the virion; a body domain constructed from β-spiral repeats; and a globular head with receptor-binding properties. The σ1 tail is predicted to form an α-helical coiled coil. Although σ1 undergoes a conformational change during cell entry, the nature of this change and its contributions to viral replication are unknown. Electron micrographs of σ1 molecules released from virions identified three regions of flexibility, including one at the midpoint of the molecule, that may be involved in its structural rearrangement. To enable a detailed understanding of essential σ1 tail organization and properties, we determined high-resolution structures of the reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) σ1 tail domains. Both molecules feature extended α-helical coiled coils, with T1L σ1 harboring central chloride ions. Each molecule displays a discontinuity (stutter) within the coiled coil and an unexpectedly seamless transition to the body domain. The transition region features conserved interdomain interactions and appears rigid rather than highly flexible. Functional analyses of reoviruses containing engineered σ1 mutations suggest that conserved residues predicted to stabilize the coiled-coil-to-body junction are essential for σ1 folding and encapsidation, whereas central chloride ion coordination and the stutter are dispensable for efficient replication. Together, these findings enable modeling of full-length reovirus σ1 and provide insight into the stabilization of a multidomain virus attachment protein. While it is established that different conformational states of attachment proteins of enveloped viruses mediate receptor binding and membrane fusion, less is understood about how such proteins mediate attachment and entry of nonenveloped viruses. The filamentous reovirus attachment protein σ1 binds cellular receptors; contains regions of predicted flexibility, including one at the fiber midpoint; and undergoes a conformational change during cell entry. Neither the nature of the structural change nor its contribution to viral infection is understood. We determined crystal structures of large σ1 fragments for two different reovirus serotypes. We observed an unexpectedly tight transition between two domains spanning the fiber midpoint, which allows for little flexibility. Studies of reoviruses with engineered changes near the σ1 midpoint suggest that the stabilization of this region is critical for function. Together with a previously determined structure, we now have a complete model of the full-length, elongated reovirus σ1 attachment protein.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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Functional features of the "finger" domain of the DEG/ENaC channels MEC-4 and UNC-8.
Matthewman C, Johnson CK, Miller DM, Bianchi L
(2018) Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 315: C155-C163
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Calcium, Cell Death, Cell Membrane Permeability, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Magnesium, Membrane Proteins, Mutation, Oocytes, Protein Transport, Sodium, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
UNC-8 and MEC-4 are two members of the degenerin/epithelial Na channel (DEG/ENaC) family of voltage-independent Na channels that share a high degree of sequence homology and functional similarity. For example, both can be hyperactivated by genetic mutations [UNC-8(d) and MEC-4(d)] that induce neuronal death by necrosis. Both depend in vivo on chaperone protein MEC-6 for function, as demonstrated by the finding that neuronal death induced by hyperactive UNC-8 and MEC-4 channels is prevented by null mutations in mec-6. UNC-8 and MEC-4 differ functionally in three major ways: 1) MEC-4 is calcium permeable, whereas UNC-8 is not; 2) UNC-8, but not MEC-4, is blocked by extracellular calcium and magnesium in the micromolar range; and 3) MEC-6 increases the number of MEC-4 channels at the cell surface in oocytes but does not have this effect on UNC-8. We previously reported that Capermeability of MEC-4 is conferred by the second transmembrane domain. We show here that the extracellular "finger" domain of UNC-8 is sufficient to mediate inhibition by divalent cations and that regulation by MEC-6 also depends on this region. Thus, our work confirms that the finger domain houses residues involved in gating of this channel class and shows for the first time that the finger domain also mediates regulation by chaperone protein MEC-6. Given that the finger domain is the most divergent region across the DEG/ENaC family, we speculate that it influences channel trafficking and function in a unique manner depending on the channel subunit.
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13 MeSH Terms
Comprehensive Analysis of Constraint on the Spatial Distribution of Missense Variants in Human Protein Structures.
Sivley RM, Dou X, Meiler J, Bush WS, Capra JA
(2018) Am J Hum Genet 102: 415-426
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Cluster Analysis, Humans, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Missense, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The spatial distribution of genetic variation within proteins is shaped by evolutionary constraint and provides insight into the functional importance of protein regions and the potential pathogenicity of protein alterations. Here, we comprehensively evaluate the 3D spatial patterns of human germline and somatic variation in 6,604 experimentally derived protein structures and 33,144 computationally derived homology models covering 77% of all human proteins. Using a systematic approach, we quantify differences in the spatial distributions of neutral germline variants, disease-causing germline variants, and recurrent somatic variants. Neutral missense variants exhibit a general trend toward spatial dispersion, which is driven by constraint on core residues. In contrast, germline disease-causing variants are generally clustered in protein structures and form clusters more frequently than recurrent somatic variants identified from tumor sequencing. In total, we identify 215 proteins with significant spatial constraints on the distribution of disease-causing missense variants in experimentally derived protein structures, only 65 (30%) of which have been previously reported. This analysis identifies many clusters not detectable from sequence information alone; only 12% of proteins with significant clustering in 3D were identified from similar analyses of linear protein sequence. Furthermore, spatial analyses of mutations in homology-based structural models are highly correlated with those from experimentally derived structures, supporting the use of computationally derived models. Our approach highlights significant differences in the spatial constraints on different classes of mutations in protein structure and identifies regions of potential function within individual proteins.
Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Salt-bridge modulates differential calcium-mediated ligand binding to integrin α1- and α2-I domains.
Brown KL, Banerjee S, Feigley A, Abe H, Blackwell TS, Pozzi A, Hudson BG, Zent R
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 2916
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Calcium, Hydrogen Bonding, Integrin alpha1, Integrin alpha2, Ligands, Models, Molecular, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Integrins are transmembrane cell-extracellular matrix adhesion receptors that impact many cellular functions. A subgroup of integrins contain an inserted (I) domain within the α-subunits (αI) that mediate ligand recognition where function is contingent on binding a divalent cation at the metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). Ca is reported to promote α1I but inhibit α2I ligand binding. We co-crystallized individual I-domains with MIDAS-bound Ca and report structures at 1.4 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively. Both structures are in the "closed" ligand binding conformation where Ca induces minimal global structural changes. Comparisons with Mg-bound structures reveal Mg and Ca bind α1I in a manner sufficient to promote ligand binding. In contrast, Ca is displaced in the α2I domain MIDAS by 1.4 Å relative to Mg and unable to directly coordinate all MIDAS residues. We identified an E152-R192 salt bridge hypothesized to limit the flexibility of the α2I MIDAS, thus, reducing Ca binding. A α2I E152A construct resulted in a 10,000-fold increase in Mg and Ca binding affinity while increasing binding to collagen ligands 20%. These data indicate the E152-R192 salt bridge is a key distinction in the molecular mechanism of differential ion binding of these two I domains.
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10 MeSH Terms
Identifying the substrate proteins of U-box E3s E4B and CHIP by orthogonal ubiquitin transfer.
Bhuripanyo K, Wang Y, Liu X, Zhou L, Liu R, Duong D, Zhao B, Bi Y, Zhou H, Chen G, Seyfried NT, Chazin WJ, Kiyokawa H, Yin J
(2018) Sci Adv 4: e1701393
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Bacteriophages, Biocatalysis, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mutant Proteins, Mutation, Peptides, Proteolysis, Reproducibility of Results, Signal Transduction, Substrate Specificity, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Ubiquitin, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
E3 ubiquitin (UB) ligases E4B and carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) use a common U-box motif to transfer UB from E1 and E2 enzymes to their substrate proteins and regulate diverse cellular processes. To profile their ubiquitination targets in the cell, we used phage display to engineer E2-E4B and E2-CHIP pairs that were free of cross-reactivity with the native UB transfer cascades. We then used the engineered E2-E3 pairs to construct "orthogonal UB transfer (OUT)" cascades so that a mutant UB (xUB) could be exclusively used by the engineered E4B or CHIP to label their substrate proteins. Purification of xUB-conjugated proteins followed by proteomics analysis enabled the identification of hundreds of potential substrates of E4B and CHIP in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinase MAPK3 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 3), methyltransferase PRMT1 (protein arginine -methyltransferase 1), and phosphatase PPP3CA (protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha) were identified as the shared substrates of the two E3s. Phosphatase PGAM5 (phosphoglycerate mutase 5) and deubiquitinase OTUB1 (ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1) were confirmed as E4B substrates, and β-catenin and CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) were confirmed as CHIP substrates. On the basis of the CHIP-CDK4 circuit identified by OUT, we revealed that CHIP signals CDK4 degradation in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.
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20 MeSH Terms