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Associations of Thigh and Abdominal Adipose Tissue Radiodensity with Glucose and Insulin in Nondiabetic African-Ancestry Men.
Tilves C, Zmuda JM, Kuipers AL, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Wheeler V, Peddada SD, Nair S, Miljkovic I
(2020) Obesity (Silver Spring) 28: 404-411
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Blood Glucose, Body Composition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Overweight, Subcutaneous Fat, Thigh, West Indies
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
OBJECTIVE - Decreased radiodensity of adipose tissue (AT) located in the visceral AT (VAT), subcutaneous AT (SAT), and intermuscular AT (IMAT) abdominal depots is associated with hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance independent of AT volumes. These associations were sought in African-ancestry men, who have higher risk for type 2 diabetes and have been underrepresented in previous studies.
METHODS - This cross-sectional analysis included 505 nondiabetic men of African-Caribbean ancestry (median age: 61 years; median BMI: 26.8 kg/m ) from the Tobago Health Study. AT volumes and radiodensities were assessed using computed tomography, including abdominal (VAT and SAT) and thigh (IMAT) depots. Associations between AT radiodensities were assessed with fasting serum glucose and insulin and with insulin resistance (updated homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, HOMA2-IR).
RESULTS - Higher radiodensity in any AT depot was associated with lower log-insulin and log-HOMA2-IR (β range: -0.16 to -0.18 for each; all P < 0.0001). No AT radiodensity was associated with glucose. Thigh IMAT radiodensity associations were independent of, and similar in magnitude to, VAT radiodensities. Model fit statistics suggested that AT radiodensities were a better predictor for insulin and insulin resistance compared with AT volumes in individuals with overweight and obesity.
CONCLUSIONS - AT radiodensities at multiple depots are significantly associated with insulin and insulin resistance in African-ancestry men.
© 2019 The Obesity Society.
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19 MeSH Terms
Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 23.
Robinson-Cohen C, Bartz TM, Lai D, Ikizler TA, Peacock M, Imel EA, Michos ED, Foroud TM, Akesson K, Taylor KD, Malmgren L, Matsushita K, Nethander M, Eriksson J, Ohlsson C, Mellström D, Wolf M, Ljunggren O, McGuigan F, Rotter JI, Karlsson M, Econs MJ, Ix JH, Lutsey PL, Psaty BM, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum BR
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 2583-2592
MeSH Terms: African Continental Ancestry Group, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney, Male, Phosphates, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RGS Proteins, Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIa, Vitamin D, Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone that regulates phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism, contributes to the pathogenesis of mineral and bone disorders in CKD and is an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. Central elements of FGF23 regulation remain incompletely understood; genetic variation may help explain interindividual differences.
METHODS - We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of circulating FGF23 concentrations among 16,624 participants of European ancestry from seven cohort studies, excluding participants with eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m to focus on FGF23 under normal conditions. We evaluated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed FGF23 concentration, adjusted for age, sex, study site, and principal components of ancestry. A second model additionally adjusted for BMI and eGFR.
RESULTS - We discovered 154 SNPs from five independent regions associated with FGF23 concentration. The SNP with the strongest association, rs17216707 (=3.0×10), lies upstream of , which encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the T allele at this locus is associated with 5% higher FGF23 concentration. Another locus strongly associated with variations in FGF23 concentration is rs11741640, within and upstream of (a gene involved in renal phosphate transport). Additional adjustment for BMI and eGFR did not materially alter the magnitude of these associations. Another top locus (within , the ABO blood group transferase gene) was no longer statistically significant at the genome-wide level.
CONCLUSIONS - Common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and renal phosphate transport are associated with differences in circulating FGF23 concentrations.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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15 MeSH Terms
Associations of coronary artery calcified plaque density with mortality in type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes Heart Study.
Raffield LM, Cox AJ, Criqui MH, Hsu FC, Terry JG, Xu J, Freedman BI, Carr JJ, Bowden DW
(2018) Cardiovasc Diabetol 17: 67
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Prognosis, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) is strongly predictive of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality, both in general populations and individuals with type 2 diabetes at high risk for CVD. CAC is typically reported as an Agatston score, which is weighted for increased plaque density. However, the role of CAC density in CVD risk prediction, independently and with CAC volume, remains unclear.
METHODS - We examined the role of CAC density in individuals with type 2 diabetes from the family-based Diabetes Heart Study and the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. CAC density was calculated as mass divided by volume, and associations with incident all-cause and CVD mortality [median follow-up 10.2 years European Americans (n = 902, n = 286 deceased), 5.2 years African Americans (n = 552, n = 93 deceased)] were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, independently and in models adjusted for CAC volume.
RESULTS - In European Americans, CAC density, like Agatston score and volume, was consistently associated with increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality (p ≤ 0.002) in models adjusted for age, sex, statin use, total cholesterol, HDL, systolic blood pressure, high blood pressure medication use, and current smoking. However, these associations were no longer significant when models were additionally adjusted for CAC volume. CAC density was not significantly associated with mortality, either alone or adjusted for CAC volume, in African Americans.
CONCLUSIONS - CAC density is not associated with mortality independent from CAC volume in European Americans and African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
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18 MeSH Terms
Balanced high fat diet reduces cardiovascular risk in obese women although changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, and insulin resistance differ by race.
Niswender KD, Fazio S, Gower BA, Silver HJ
(2018) Metabolism 82: 125-134
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diet, High-Fat, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Lipoproteins, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - We previously reported that consuming a balanced high fat diet (BHFD) wherein total saturated fat was reduced and total unsaturated fat increased by proportionately balancing the type of fat (1/3 saturated, 1/3 monounsaturated, 1/3 polyunsaturated) led to significant improvements in inflammatory burden, blood pressure, and vascular function in obese premenopausal European American (EA) and African American (AA) women.
OBJECTIVE - Here we compared changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk between EA and AA women.
METHODS - Dietary intakes, plasma fatty acids, lipids, apolipoproteins, lipoproteins, HOMA-IR and ASCVD risk was measured in 144 women who consumed BHFD for 16 weeks. Generalized linear modeling was performed while controlling for change in body weight.
RESULTS - EA women had greater reductions in visceral adipose tissue. Only EA women had significant reductions in fasting insulin levels (↓24.8%) and HOMA-IR (↓29%) scores. In EA women, the most significant improvements occurred in VLDL particle size (↑), apolipoprotein B levels (↑), serum TG (↓), number of plasma LDL particles (↓), and serum LDL-cholesterol (↓). In AA women, significant improvements occurred in HDL particle size (↑), number of large HDL particles (↑), and apolipoprotein AI levels (↑). Consequently, both groups had improved ASCVD risk scores (↓5.5%).
CONCLUSIONS - Consuming the balanced high fat diet led to significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factors in both groups. However, the pattern of response to BHFD differed with EA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein B pathway versus AA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein AI pathway.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Local ancestry transitions modify snp-trait associations.
Fish AE, Crawford DC, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2018) Pac Symp Biocomput 23: 424-435
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Haplotypes, Humans, Linear Models, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Genomic maps of local ancestry identify ancestry transitions - points on a chromosome where recent recombination events in admixed individuals have joined two different ancestral haplotypes. These events bring together alleles that evolved within separate continential populations, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the joint effect of these alleles on health outcomes. In this work, we evaluate the impact of genetic variants in the context of nearby local ancestry transitions within a sample of nearly 10,000 adults of African ancestry with traits derived from electronic health records. Genetic data was located using the Metabochip, and used to derive local ancestry. We develop a model that captures the effect of both single variants and local ancestry, and use it to identify examples where local ancestry transitions significantly interact with nearby variants to influence metabolic traits. In our most compelling example, we find that the minor allele of rs16890640 occuring on a European background with a downstream local ancestry transition to African ancestry results in significantly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume. This finding represents a new way of discovering genetic interactions, and is supported by molecular data that suggest changes to local ancestry may impact local chromatin looping.
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16 MeSH Terms
An ancestry-based approach for detecting interactions.
Park DS, Eskin I, Kang EY, Gamazon ER, Eng C, Gignoux CR, Galanter JM, Burchard E, Ye CJ, Aschard H, Eskin E, Halperin E, Zaitlen N
(2018) Genet Epidemiol 42: 49-63
MeSH Terms: African Americans, African Continental Ancestry Group, DNA Methylation, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Gene-Environment Interaction, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Models, Genetic, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2017
BACKGROUND - Epistasis and gene-environment interactions are known to contribute significantly to variation of complex phenotypes in model organisms. However, their identification in human association studies remains challenging for myriad reasons. In the case of epistatic interactions, the large number of potential interacting sets of genes presents computational, multiple hypothesis correction, and other statistical power issues. In the case of gene-environment interactions, the lack of consistently measured environmental covariates in most disease studies precludes searching for interactions and creates difficulties for replicating studies.
RESULTS - In this work, we develop a new statistical approach to address these issues that leverages genetic ancestry, defined as the proportion of ancestry derived from each ancestral population (e.g., the fraction of European/African ancestry in African Americans), in admixed populations. We applied our method to gene expression and methylation data from African American and Latino admixed individuals, respectively, identifying nine interactions that were significant at P<5×10-8. We show that two of the interactions in methylation data replicate, and the remaining six are significantly enriched for low P-values (P<1.8×10-6).
CONCLUSION - We show that genetic ancestry can be a useful proxy for unknown and unmeasured covariates in the search for interaction effects. These results have important implications for our understanding of the genetic architecture of complex traits.
© 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.
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10 MeSH Terms
Evidence of selection as a cause for racial disparities in fibroproliferative disease.
Hellwege JN, Torstenson ES, Russell SB, Edwards TL, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0182791
MeSH Terms: African Continental Ancestry Group, Connective Tissue Diseases, Databases, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Models, Genetic, Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prevalence, Quantitative Trait Loci, Risk Assessment, Selection, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Fibroproliferative diseases are common complex traits featuring scarring and overgrowth of connective tissue which vary widely in presentation because they affect many organ systems. Most fibroproliferative diseases are more prevalent in African-derived populations than in European populations, leading to pronounced health disparities. It is hypothesized that the increased prevalence of these diseases in African-derived populations is due to selection for pro-fibrotic alleles that are protective against helminth infections. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) of fibroproliferative disease risk-increasing alleles using 147 linkage disequilibrium-pruned variants identified through genome-wide association studies of seven fibroproliferative diseases with large African-European prevalence disparities. A comparison of the fibroproliferative disease GRS between 1000 Genomes Phase 3 populations detected a higher mean GRS in AFR (mean = 148 risk alleles) than EUR (mean = 136 risk alleles; T-test p-value = 1.75x10-123). To test whether differences in GRS burden are systematic and may be due to selection, we employed the quantitative trait loci (QTL) sign test. The QTL sign test result indicates that population differences in risk-increasing allele burdens at these fibroproliferative disease variants are systematic and support a model featuring selective pressure (p-value = 0.011). These observations were replicated in an independent sample and were more statistically significant (T-test p-value = 7.26x10-237, sign test p-value = 0.015). This evidence supports the role of selective pressure acting to increase frequency of fibroproliferative alleles in populations of African relative to European ancestry populations.
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MeSH Terms
African genetic ancestry interacts with body mass index to modify risk for uterine fibroids.
Giri A, Edwards TL, Hartmann KE, Torstenson ES, Wellons M, Schreiner PJ, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006871
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Leiomyoma, Logistic Models, Obesity, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
Race, specifically African ancestry, and obesity are important risk factors for uterine fibroids, and likely interact to provide the right conditions for fibroid growth. However, existing studies largely focus on the main-effects rather than their interaction. Here, we firstly provide evidence for interaction between categories of body mass index (BMI) and reported-race in relation to uterine fibroids. We then investigate whether the association between inferred local European ancestry and fibroid risk is modified by BMI in African American (AA) women in the Vanderbilt University Medical Center bio-repository (BioVU) (539 cases and 794 controls) and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA, 264 cases and 173 controls). We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate interactions between local European ancestry and BMI in relation to fibroid risk, then performed fixed effects meta-analysis. Statistical significance threshold for local-ancestry and BMI interactions was empirically estimated with 10,000 permutations (p-value = 1.18x10-4). Admixture mapping detected an association between European ancestry and fibroid risk which was modified by BMI (continuous-interaction p-value = 3.75x10-5) around ADTRP (chromosome 6p24); the strongest association was found in the obese category (ancestry odds ratio (AOR) = 0.51, p-value = 2.23x10-5). Evaluation of interaction between genotyped/imputed variants and BMI in this targeted region suggested race-specific interaction, present in AAs only; strongest evidence was found for insertion/deletion variant (6:11946435), again in the obese category (OR = 1.66, p-value = 1.72x10-6). We found nominal evidence for interaction between local ancestry and BMI at a previously reported region in chromosome 2q31-32, which includes COL5A2, and TFPI, an immediate downstream target of ADTRP. Interactions between BMI and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) found in this region in AA women were also detected in an independent European American population of 1,195 cases and 1,164 controls. Findings from our study provide an example of how modifiable and non-modifiable factors may interact to influence fibroid risk and suggest a biological role for BMI in fibroid etiology.
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MeSH Terms
Association of ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac and coronary artery calcification in african ancestry men.
Kuipers AL, Zmuda JM, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Nair S, Cvejkus R, Bunker CH, Patrick AL, Wassel CL, Miljkovic I
(2017) Atherosclerosis 263: 198-204
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Diseases, Aortography, Chi-Square Distribution, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Humans, Iliac Artery, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Liver, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Trinidad and Tobago, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - There is strong evidence that fat accumulating in non-adipose sites, "ectopic fat", is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including vascular calcification. Most previous studies of this association have assessed only a single ectopic fat depot. Therefore, our aim was to assess the association of total, regional, and ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac calcification (AAC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in 798 African ancestry men.
METHODS - Participants (mean age 62) were from the Tobago Bone Health Study cohort. Adiposity was assessed via clinical examination, dual x-ray absorptiometry, and computed tomography (CT). Ectopic fat depots included: abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), liver attenuation, and calf intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). Vascular calcification was assessed by CT and quantified as present versus absent. Associations were tested using multiple logistic regression adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Models of ectopic fat were additionally adjusted for total body fat and standing height.
RESULTS - All adiposity measures, except VAT, were associated with AAC. Lower liver attenuation or greater calf IMAT was associated with 1.2-1.3-fold increased odds of AAC (p < 0.03 for both), though calf IMAT was a stronger predictor than liver attenuation (p < 0.001) when entered in a single model. No ectopic fat measure was associated with CAC.
CONCLUSIONS - Greater adiposity in the skeletal muscle and liver, but not in the visceral compartment, was associated with increased odds of AAC in African ancestry men. These results highlight the potential importance of both quantity and location of adiposity accumulation throughout the body.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study to identify variants associated with acute severe vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell anemia.
Chaturvedi S, Bhatnagar P, Bean CJ, Steinberg MH, Milton JN, Casella JF, Barron-Casella E, Arking DE, DeBaun MR
(2017) Blood 130: 686-688
MeSH Terms: Acute Pain, Adolescent, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Epistasis, Genetic, Female, Fetal Hemoglobin, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Male, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies
Added June 7, 2017
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19 MeSH Terms