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Associations of coronary artery calcified plaque density with mortality in type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes Heart Study.
Raffield LM, Cox AJ, Criqui MH, Hsu FC, Terry JG, Xu J, Freedman BI, Carr JJ, Bowden DW
(2018) Cardiovasc Diabetol 17: 67
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Prognosis, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) is strongly predictive of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality, both in general populations and individuals with type 2 diabetes at high risk for CVD. CAC is typically reported as an Agatston score, which is weighted for increased plaque density. However, the role of CAC density in CVD risk prediction, independently and with CAC volume, remains unclear.
METHODS - We examined the role of CAC density in individuals with type 2 diabetes from the family-based Diabetes Heart Study and the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. CAC density was calculated as mass divided by volume, and associations with incident all-cause and CVD mortality [median follow-up 10.2 years European Americans (n = 902, n = 286 deceased), 5.2 years African Americans (n = 552, n = 93 deceased)] were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, independently and in models adjusted for CAC volume.
RESULTS - In European Americans, CAC density, like Agatston score and volume, was consistently associated with increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality (p ≤ 0.002) in models adjusted for age, sex, statin use, total cholesterol, HDL, systolic blood pressure, high blood pressure medication use, and current smoking. However, these associations were no longer significant when models were additionally adjusted for CAC volume. CAC density was not significantly associated with mortality, either alone or adjusted for CAC volume, in African Americans.
CONCLUSIONS - CAC density is not associated with mortality independent from CAC volume in European Americans and African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
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18 MeSH Terms
Balanced high fat diet reduces cardiovascular risk in obese women although changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, and insulin resistance differ by race.
Niswender KD, Fazio S, Gower BA, Silver HJ
(2018) Metabolism 82: 125-134
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diet, High-Fat, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Lipoproteins, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - We previously reported that consuming a balanced high fat diet (BHFD) wherein total saturated fat was reduced and total unsaturated fat increased by proportionately balancing the type of fat (1/3 saturated, 1/3 monounsaturated, 1/3 polyunsaturated) led to significant improvements in inflammatory burden, blood pressure, and vascular function in obese premenopausal European American (EA) and African American (AA) women.
OBJECTIVE - Here we compared changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk between EA and AA women.
METHODS - Dietary intakes, plasma fatty acids, lipids, apolipoproteins, lipoproteins, HOMA-IR and ASCVD risk was measured in 144 women who consumed BHFD for 16 weeks. Generalized linear modeling was performed while controlling for change in body weight.
RESULTS - EA women had greater reductions in visceral adipose tissue. Only EA women had significant reductions in fasting insulin levels (↓24.8%) and HOMA-IR (↓29%) scores. In EA women, the most significant improvements occurred in VLDL particle size (↑), apolipoprotein B levels (↑), serum TG (↓), number of plasma LDL particles (↓), and serum LDL-cholesterol (↓). In AA women, significant improvements occurred in HDL particle size (↑), number of large HDL particles (↑), and apolipoprotein AI levels (↑). Consequently, both groups had improved ASCVD risk scores (↓5.5%).
CONCLUSIONS - Consuming the balanced high fat diet led to significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factors in both groups. However, the pattern of response to BHFD differed with EA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein B pathway versus AA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein AI pathway.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Local ancestry transitions modify snp-trait associations.
Fish AE, Crawford DC, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2018) Pac Symp Biocomput 23: 424-435
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Haplotypes, Humans, Linear Models, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Genomic maps of local ancestry identify ancestry transitions - points on a chromosome where recent recombination events in admixed individuals have joined two different ancestral haplotypes. These events bring together alleles that evolved within separate continential populations, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the joint effect of these alleles on health outcomes. In this work, we evaluate the impact of genetic variants in the context of nearby local ancestry transitions within a sample of nearly 10,000 adults of African ancestry with traits derived from electronic health records. Genetic data was located using the Metabochip, and used to derive local ancestry. We develop a model that captures the effect of both single variants and local ancestry, and use it to identify examples where local ancestry transitions significantly interact with nearby variants to influence metabolic traits. In our most compelling example, we find that the minor allele of rs16890640 occuring on a European background with a downstream local ancestry transition to African ancestry results in significantly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume. This finding represents a new way of discovering genetic interactions, and is supported by molecular data that suggest changes to local ancestry may impact local chromatin looping.
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16 MeSH Terms
An ancestry-based approach for detecting interactions.
Park DS, Eskin I, Kang EY, Gamazon ER, Eng C, Gignoux CR, Galanter JM, Burchard E, Ye CJ, Aschard H, Eskin E, Halperin E, Zaitlen N
(2018) Genet Epidemiol 42: 49-63
MeSH Terms: African Americans, African Continental Ancestry Group, DNA Methylation, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Gene-Environment Interaction, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Models, Genetic, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2017
BACKGROUND - Epistasis and gene-environment interactions are known to contribute significantly to variation of complex phenotypes in model organisms. However, their identification in human association studies remains challenging for myriad reasons. In the case of epistatic interactions, the large number of potential interacting sets of genes presents computational, multiple hypothesis correction, and other statistical power issues. In the case of gene-environment interactions, the lack of consistently measured environmental covariates in most disease studies precludes searching for interactions and creates difficulties for replicating studies.
RESULTS - In this work, we develop a new statistical approach to address these issues that leverages genetic ancestry, defined as the proportion of ancestry derived from each ancestral population (e.g., the fraction of European/African ancestry in African Americans), in admixed populations. We applied our method to gene expression and methylation data from African American and Latino admixed individuals, respectively, identifying nine interactions that were significant at P<5×10-8. We show that two of the interactions in methylation data replicate, and the remaining six are significantly enriched for low P-values (P<1.8×10-6).
CONCLUSION - We show that genetic ancestry can be a useful proxy for unknown and unmeasured covariates in the search for interaction effects. These results have important implications for our understanding of the genetic architecture of complex traits.
© 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.
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10 MeSH Terms
African genetic ancestry interacts with body mass index to modify risk for uterine fibroids.
Giri A, Edwards TL, Hartmann KE, Torstenson ES, Wellons M, Schreiner PJ, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006871
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Leiomyoma, Logistic Models, Obesity, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
Race, specifically African ancestry, and obesity are important risk factors for uterine fibroids, and likely interact to provide the right conditions for fibroid growth. However, existing studies largely focus on the main-effects rather than their interaction. Here, we firstly provide evidence for interaction between categories of body mass index (BMI) and reported-race in relation to uterine fibroids. We then investigate whether the association between inferred local European ancestry and fibroid risk is modified by BMI in African American (AA) women in the Vanderbilt University Medical Center bio-repository (BioVU) (539 cases and 794 controls) and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA, 264 cases and 173 controls). We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate interactions between local European ancestry and BMI in relation to fibroid risk, then performed fixed effects meta-analysis. Statistical significance threshold for local-ancestry and BMI interactions was empirically estimated with 10,000 permutations (p-value = 1.18x10-4). Admixture mapping detected an association between European ancestry and fibroid risk which was modified by BMI (continuous-interaction p-value = 3.75x10-5) around ADTRP (chromosome 6p24); the strongest association was found in the obese category (ancestry odds ratio (AOR) = 0.51, p-value = 2.23x10-5). Evaluation of interaction between genotyped/imputed variants and BMI in this targeted region suggested race-specific interaction, present in AAs only; strongest evidence was found for insertion/deletion variant (6:11946435), again in the obese category (OR = 1.66, p-value = 1.72x10-6). We found nominal evidence for interaction between local ancestry and BMI at a previously reported region in chromosome 2q31-32, which includes COL5A2, and TFPI, an immediate downstream target of ADTRP. Interactions between BMI and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) found in this region in AA women were also detected in an independent European American population of 1,195 cases and 1,164 controls. Findings from our study provide an example of how modifiable and non-modifiable factors may interact to influence fibroid risk and suggest a biological role for BMI in fibroid etiology.
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MeSH Terms
Association of ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac and coronary artery calcification in african ancestry men.
Kuipers AL, Zmuda JM, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Nair S, Cvejkus R, Bunker CH, Patrick AL, Wassel CL, Miljkovic I
(2017) Atherosclerosis 263: 198-204
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Diseases, Aortography, Chi-Square Distribution, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Humans, Iliac Artery, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Liver, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Trinidad and Tobago, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - There is strong evidence that fat accumulating in non-adipose sites, "ectopic fat", is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including vascular calcification. Most previous studies of this association have assessed only a single ectopic fat depot. Therefore, our aim was to assess the association of total, regional, and ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac calcification (AAC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in 798 African ancestry men.
METHODS - Participants (mean age 62) were from the Tobago Bone Health Study cohort. Adiposity was assessed via clinical examination, dual x-ray absorptiometry, and computed tomography (CT). Ectopic fat depots included: abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), liver attenuation, and calf intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). Vascular calcification was assessed by CT and quantified as present versus absent. Associations were tested using multiple logistic regression adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Models of ectopic fat were additionally adjusted for total body fat and standing height.
RESULTS - All adiposity measures, except VAT, were associated with AAC. Lower liver attenuation or greater calf IMAT was associated with 1.2-1.3-fold increased odds of AAC (p < 0.03 for both), though calf IMAT was a stronger predictor than liver attenuation (p < 0.001) when entered in a single model. No ectopic fat measure was associated with CAC.
CONCLUSIONS - Greater adiposity in the skeletal muscle and liver, but not in the visceral compartment, was associated with increased odds of AAC in African ancestry men. These results highlight the potential importance of both quantity and location of adiposity accumulation throughout the body.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study to identify variants associated with acute severe vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell anemia.
Chaturvedi S, Bhatnagar P, Bean CJ, Steinberg MH, Milton JN, Casella JF, Barron-Casella E, Arking DE, DeBaun MR
(2017) Blood 130: 686-688
MeSH Terms: Acute Pain, Adolescent, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Epistasis, Genetic, Female, Fetal Hemoglobin, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Male, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies
Added June 7, 2017
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19 MeSH Terms
Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.
Ng MCY, Graff M, Lu Y, Justice AE, Mudgal P, Liu CT, Young K, Yanek LR, Feitosa MF, Wojczynski MK, Rand K, Brody JA, Cade BE, Dimitrov L, Duan Q, Guo X, Lange LA, Nalls MA, Okut H, Tajuddin SM, Tayo BO, Vedantam S, Bradfield JP, Chen G, Chen WM, Chesi A, Irvin MR, Padhukasahasram B, Smith JA, Zheng W, Allison MA, Ambrosone CB, Bandera EV, Bartz TM, Berndt SI, Bernstein L, Blot WJ, Bottinger EP, Carpten J, Chanock SJ, Chen YI, Conti DV, Cooper RS, Fornage M, Freedman BI, Garcia M, Goodman PJ, Hsu YH, Hu J, Huff CD, Ingles SA, John EM, Kittles R, Klein E, Li J, McKnight B, Nayak U, Nemesure B, Ogunniyi A, Olshan A, Press MF, Rohde R, Rybicki BA, Salako B, Sanderson M, Shao Y, Siscovick DS, Stanford JL, Stevens VL, Stram A, Strom SS, Vaidya D, Witte JS, Yao J, Zhu X, Ziegler RG, Zonderman AB, Adeyemo A, Ambs S, Cushman M, Faul JD, Hakonarson H, Levin AM, Nathanson KL, Ware EB, Weir DR, Zhao W, Zhi D, Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study (BMDCS) Group, Arnett DK, Grant SFA, Kardia SLR, Oloapde OI, Rao DC, Rotimi CN, Sale MM, Williams LK, Zemel BS, Becker DM, Borecki IB, Evans MK, Harris TB, Hirschhorn JN, Li Y, Patel SR, Psaty BM, Rotter JI, Wilson JG, Bowden DW, Cupples LA, Haiman CA, Loos RJF, North KE
(2017) PLoS Genet 13: e1006719
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anthropometry, Body Mass Index, Chromosome Mapping, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Male, Obesity, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Serine Endopeptidases, Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Protein, Waist-Hip Ratio
Show Abstract · Added August 22, 2017
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC) using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2) for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2) was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women) and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women) in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%). In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus) from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement in identifying GWAS loci including low frequency variants. Trans-ethnic meta-analyses further improved fine mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between the African and European ancestry populations.
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18 MeSH Terms
Evaluating the role of race and medication in protection of uterine fibroids by type 2 diabetes exposure.
Velez Edwards DR, Hartmann KE, Wellons M, Shah A, Xu H, Edwards TL
(2017) BMC Womens Health 17: 28
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Leiomyoma, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
BACKGROUND - Uterine fibroids (UF) affect 77% of women by menopause, and account for $9.4 billion in annual healthcare costs. Type-2-diabetes (T2D) has inconsistently associated with protection from UFs in prior studies. To further evaluate the relationship between T2D and UFs we tested for association between T2D and UF risk in a large clinical population as well as the potential differences due to T2D medications and interaction with race.
METHODS - This nested case-control study is derived from a clinical cohort. Our outcome was UF case-control status and our exposure was T2D. UF outcomes and T2D exposure were classified using validated electronic medical record (EMR) algorithms. Logistic regression, adjusted for covariates, was used to model the association between T2D diagnosis and UF risk. Secondary analyses were performed evaluating the interaction between T2D exposure and race and stratifying T2D exposed subjects by T2D medication being taken.
RESULTS - We identified 3,789 subjects with UF outcomes (608 UF cases and 3,181 controls), 714 were diabetic and 3,075 were non-diabetic. We observed a nominally significant interaction between T2D exposure and race in adjusted models (interaction p = 0.083). Race stratified analyses demonstrated more protection by T2D exposure on UF risk among European Americans (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.50, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.72) than African Americans (aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.17). We also observed a protective effect by T2D regardless of type of T2D medication being taken, with slightly more protection among subjects on insulin treatments (European Americans aOR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.68; African Americans aOR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.01).
CONCLUSIONS - These data, conducted in a large population of UF cases and controls, support prior studies that have found a protective association between diabetes presence and UF risk and is further modified by race. Protection from UFs by T2D exposure was observed regardless of medication type with slightly more protection among insulin users. Further mechanistic research in larger cohorts is necessary to reconcile the potential role of T2D in UF risk.
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13 MeSH Terms
Sex, Race, and HIV Risk Disparities in Discontinuity of HIV Care After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in the United States and Canada.
Rebeiro PF, Abraham AG, Horberg MA, Althoff KN, Yehia BR, Buchacz K, Lau BM, Sterling TR, Gange SJ
(2017) AIDS Patient Care STDS 31: 129-144
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Canada, Cohort Studies, HIV Infections, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk, Sex Factors, Substance Abuse, Intravenous, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Disruption of continuous retention in care (discontinuity) is associated with HIV disease progression. We examined sex, race, and HIV risk disparities in discontinuity after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among patients in North America. Adults (≥18 years of age) initiating ART from 2000 to 2010 were included. Discontinuity was defined as first disruption of continuous retention (≥2 visits separated by >90 days in the calendar year). Relative hazard ratio (HR) and times from ART initiation until discontinuity by race, sex, and HIV risk were assessed by modeling of the cumulative incidence function (CIF) in the presence of the competing risk of death. Models were adjusted for cohort site, baseline age, and CD4 cell count within 1 year before ART initiation; nadir CD4 cell count after ART, but before a study event, was assessed as a mediator. Among 17,171 adults initiating ART, median follow-up time was 3.97 years, and 49% were observed to have ≥1 discontinuity of care. In adjusted regression models, the hazard of discontinuity for patients was lower for females versus males [HR: 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-0.89] and higher for blacks versus nonblacks (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12-1.23) and persons with injection drug use (IDU) versus non-IDU risk (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.25-1.41). Sex, racial, and HIV risk differences in clinical retention exist, even accounting for access to care and known competing risks for discontinuity. These results point to vulnerable populations at greatest risk for discontinuity in need of improved outreach to prevent disruptions of HIV care.
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19 MeSH Terms