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Association Between Regional Adipose Tissue Distribution and Risk of Heart Failure Among Blacks.
Pandey A, Kondamudi N, Patel KV, Ayers C, Simek S, Hall ME, Musani SK, Blackshear C, Mentz RJ, Khan H, Terry JG, Correa A, Butler J, Neeland IJ, Berry JD
(2018) Circ Heart Fail 11: e005629
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, African Americans, Aged, Female, Heart Failure, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Obesity is highly prevalent among blacks and is associated with a greater risk of heart failure (HF). However, the contribution of regional adiposity depots such as visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue toward risk of HF in blacks is unknown.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We included 2602 participants (mean age: 59 years, 35% men) from the Jackson Heart Study without prevalent HF who underwent computed tomography quantification of VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue during the second visit (2005-2009). The associations between different adiposity measures and HF were evaluated using adjusted Cox models. There were 122 incident HF events over a median follow-up of 7.1 years. Higher amounts of VAT were associated with greater risk of HF in age- and sex-adjusted analyses (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-SD higher VAT: 1.29 [1.09-1.52]). This association was attenuated and not significant after additional adjustment for traditional HF risk factors and body mass index. Overall obesity, represented by body mass index, was associated with higher risk of HF independent of risk factors and VAT (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-kg/m higher body mass index: 1.06 [1.02-1.11]). Subcutaneous adipose tissue was not associated with risk of HF in adjusted analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - In a community-dwelling black population, higher amounts of overall and visceral adiposity are associated with higher risk of HF. The association between VAT and HF risk in blacks may reflect differences in traditional HF risk factor burden. Future studies are needed to confirm this observation and clarify the independent role of different measures of adiposity on HF outcomes.
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13 MeSH Terms
Perceived Unfair Treatment by Police, Race, and Telomere Length: A Nashville Community-based Sample of Black and White Men.
McFarland MJ, Taylor J, McFarland CAS, Friedman KL
(2018) J Health Soc Behav 59: 585-600
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, European Continental Ancestry Group, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Police, Racism, Stress, Psychological, Telomere, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2019
Police maltreatment, whether experienced personally or indirectly through one's family or friends, represents a structurally rooted public health problem that disproportionately affects minorities. Researchers, however, know little about the physiological mechanisms connecting unfair treatment by police (UTBP) to poor health. Shortened telomeres due to exposure to this stressor represent one plausible mechanism. Using data from a community sample of black (n = 262) and white (n = 252) men residing in Nashville-Davidson County, we test four hypotheses: (1) Black men will be more likely to report UTBP than white men, (2) those reporting UTBP will have shorter telomeres than those not reporting UTBP, (3) this association will be more pronounced among black men, and (4) these hypotheses will extend to those who report vicarious UTBP. Results reveal support for all hypotheses. The implications for our findings are discussed as they pertain to debates on policing practices and health disparities research.
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12 MeSH Terms
Race- and Sex-related Differences in Nephrolithiasis Risk Among Blacks and Whites in the Southern Community Cohort Study.
Hsi RS, Kabagambe EK, Shu X, Han X, Miller NL, Lipworth L
(2018) Urology 118: 36-42
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Cohort Studies, Continental Population Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Calculi, Male, Medicaid, Medicare, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 18, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate race-sex associations with risk among whites and blacks in the southeastern United States. The relationship between race, sex, and kidney stone risk is poorly understood.
METHODS - Participants were 42,136 black and white adults enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study between 2002 and 2009, with no history of kidney stones and receiving Medicare or Medicaid services. Incident kidney stone diagnoses through December 2014 were determined via linkage with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services research files. Hazard ratios (HRs) for associations with race and sex were computed from multivariable Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbid diseases, and dietary intakes.
RESULTS - During 116,931 and 270,917 person-years of follow-up for whites and blacks, respectively, age-adjusted incidence rates (95% confidence interval [CI]) were 5.98 (4.73-7.23) and 4.50 (3.86-5.14) per 1000 person-years for white men and women, respectively, while corresponding rates among blacks were 2.19 (1.71-2.67) and 2.47 (2.19-2.75) per 1000 person-years. Risk was higher among whites compared to blacks (HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.97-2.53). Male sex was significantly associated with risk among whites (HR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.20-1.75), but not among blacks (HR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.75-1.07). Formal tests of interaction by race and sex were statistically significant for all models (P = .01 for fully adjusted model).
CONCLUSION - The association of incident kidney stones with sex differs between whites and blacks. White men have the highest risk, while no difference in risk is observed between black men and women.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
CD36 Modulates Fasting and Preabsorptive Hormone and Bile Acid Levels.
Shibao CA, Celedonio JE, Tamboli R, Sidani R, Love-Gregory L, Pietka T, Xiong Y, Wei Y, Abumrad NN, Abumrad NA, Flynn CR
(2018) J Clin Endocrinol Metab 103: 1856-1866
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Bile Acids and Salts, CD36 Antigens, Case-Control Studies, Energy Metabolism, Fasting, Female, Genotype, Hormones, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added May 14, 2018
Context - Abnormal fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The FA receptor CD36 has been linked to risk of metabolic syndrome. In rodents CD36 regulates various aspects of fat metabolism, but whether it has similar actions in humans is unknown. We examined the impact of a coding single-nucleotide polymorphism in CD36 on postprandial hormone and bile acid (BA) responses.
Objective - To examine whether the minor allele (G) of coding CD36 variant rs3211938 (G/T), which reduces CD36 level by ∼50%, influences hormonal responses to a high-fat meal (HFM).
Design - Obese African American (AA) women carriers of the G allele of rs3211938 (G/T) and weight-matched noncarriers (T/T) were studied before and after a HFM.
Setting - Two-center study.
Participants - Obese AA women.
Intervention - HFM.
Main Outcome Measures - Early preabsorptive responses (10 minutes) and extended excursions in plasma hormones [C-peptide, insulin, incretins, ghrelin fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, FGF21], BAs, and serum lipoproteins (chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoprotein) were determined.
Results - At fasting, G-allele carriers had significantly reduced cholesterol and glycodeoxycholic acid and consistent but nonsignificant reductions of serum lipoproteins. Levels of GLP-1 and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were reduced 60% to 70% and those of total BAs were 1.8-fold higher. After the meal, G-allele carriers displayed attenuated early (-10 to 10 minute) responses in insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, gastric inhibitory peptide, and PP. BAs exhibited divergent trends in G allele carriers vs noncarriers concomitant with differential FGF19 responses.
Conclusions - CD36 plays an important role in the preabsorptive hormone and BA responses that coordinate brain and gut regulation of energy metabolism.
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Black Americans' Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators of Community Screening for Kidney Disease.
Umeukeje EM, Wild MG, Maripuri S, Davidson T, Rutherford M, Abdel-Kader K, Lewis J, Wilkins CH, Cavanaugh K
(2018) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 13: 551-559
MeSH Terms: Adult, Advertising, African Americans, Aged, Community Health Services, Cultural Competency, Emotions, Female, Focus Groups, Health Education, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Religion, Trust, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Incidence of ESKD is three times higher in black Americans than in whites, and CKD prevalence continues to rise among black Americans. Community-based kidney disease screening may increase early identification and awareness of black Americans at risk, but it is challenging to implement. This study aimed to identify participants' perspectives of community kidney disease screening. The Health Belief Model provides a theoretic framework for conceptualization of these perspectives and optimization of community kidney disease screening activities.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - Researchers in collaboration with the Tennessee Kidney Foundation conducted three focus groups of adults in black American churches in Nashville, Tennessee. Questions examined views on CKD information, access to care, and priorities of kidney disease health. Content analysis was used. Guided by the Health Belief Model, themes were generated, and additional themes were derived from the data using an inductive approach.
RESULTS - Thirty-two black Americans completed the study in 2014. Participants were mostly women (79%) with a mean age of 56 years old (range, 24-78). Two major categories of barriers to kidney disease screening were identified: () participant factors, including limited kidney disease knowledge, spiritual/religious beliefs, emotions, and culture of the individual; and () logistic factors, including lack of convenience and incentives and poor advertisement. Potential facilitators of CKD screening included provision of CKD education, convenience of screening activities, and use of culturally sensitive and enhanced communication strategies. Program recommendations included partnering with trusted community members, selecting convenient locations, tailored advertising, and provision of compensation.
CONCLUSIONS - Findings of this study suggest that provider-delivered culturally sensitive education and stakeholder engagement are critical to increase trust, decrease fear, and maximize participation and early identification of kidney disease among black Americans considering community screening.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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20 MeSH Terms
Adipose tissue depot volume relationships with spinal trabecular bone mineral density in African Americans with diabetes.
Chan GC, Divers J, Russell GB, Langefeld CD, Wagenknecht LE, Xu J, Smith SC, Bowden DW, Register TC, Carr JJ, Lenchik L, Freedman BI
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0191674
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adult, African Americans, Bone Density, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Spine
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
Changes in select adipose tissue volumes may differentially impact bone mineral density. This study was performed to assess cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between computed tomography-determined visceral (VAT), subcutaneous (SAT), inter-muscular (IMAT), and pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) volumes with respective changes in thoracic vertebral and lumbar vertebral volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (vBMD) in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Generalized linear models were fitted to test relationships between baseline and change in adipose volumes with change in vBMD in 300 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants; adjustment was performed for age, sex, diabetes duration, study interval, smoking, hypertension, BMI, kidney function, and medications. Participants were 50% female with mean ± SD age 55.1±9.0 years, diabetes duration 10.2±7.2 years, and BMI 34.7±7.7 kg/m2. Over 5.3 ± 1.4 years, mean vBMD decreased in thoracic/lumbar spine, while mean adipose tissue volumes increased in SAT, IMAT, and PAT, but not VAT depots. In fully-adjusted models, changes in lumbar and thoracic vBMD were positively associated with change in SAT (β[SE] 0.045[0.011], p<0.0001; 0.40[0.013], p = 0.002, respectively). Change in thoracic vBMD was positively associated with change in IMAT (p = 0.029) and VAT (p = 0.016); and change in lumbar vBMD positively associated with baseline IMAT (p<0.0001). In contrast, vBMD was not associated with change in PAT. After adjusting for BMI, baseline and change in volumes of select adipose depots were associated with increases in thoracic and lumbar trabecular vBMD in African Americans. Effects of adiposity on trabecular bone appear to be site-specific and related to factors beyond mechanical load.
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Transethnic Evaluation Identifies Low-Frequency Loci Associated With 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations.
Hong J, Hatchell KE, Bradfield JP, Bjonnes A, Chesi A, Lai CQ, Langefeld CD, Lu L, Lu Y, Lutsey PL, Musani SK, Nalls MA, Robinson-Cohen C, Roizen JD, Saxena R, Tucker KL, Ziegler JT, Arking DE, Bis JC, Boerwinkle E, Bottinger EP, Bowden DW, Gilsanz V, Houston DK, Kalkwarf HJ, Kelly A, Lappe JM, Liu Y, Michos ED, Oberfield SE, Palmer ND, Rotter JI, Sapkota B, Shepherd JA, Wilson JG, Basu S, de Boer IH, Divers J, Freedman BI, Grant SFA, Hakanarson H, Harris TB, Kestenbaum BR, Kritchevsky SB, Loos RJF, Norris JM, Norwood AF, Ordovas JM, Pankow JS, Psaty BM, Sanghera DK, Wagenknecht LE, Zemel BS, Meigs J, Dupuis J, Florez JC, Wang T, Liu CT, Engelman CD, Billings LK
(2018) J Clin Endocrinol Metab 103: 1380-1392
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Americans, Aged, Body Mass Index, Child, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Loci, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, United States, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
Context - Vitamin D inadequacy is common in the adult population of the United States. Although the genetic determinants underlying vitamin D inadequacy have been studied in people of European ancestry, less is known about populations with Hispanic or African ancestry.
Objective - The Trans-Ethnic Evaluation of Vitamin D (TRANSCEN-D) genomewide association study (GWAS) consortium was assembled to replicate genetic associations with 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations from the Study of Underlying Genetic Determinants of Vitamin D and Highly Related Traits (SUNLIGHT) meta-analyses of European ancestry and to identify genetic variants related to vitamin D concentrations in African and Hispanic ancestries.
Design - Ancestry-specific (Hispanic and African) and transethnic (Hispanic, African, and European) meta-analyses were performed with Meta-Analysis Helper software (METAL).
Patients or Other Participants - In total, 8541 African American and 3485 Hispanic American (from North America) participants from 12 cohorts and 16,124 European participants from SUNLIGHT were included in the study.
Main Outcome Measures - Blood concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured for all participants.
Results - Ancestry-specific analyses in African and Hispanic Americans replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GC (2 and 4 SNPs, respectively). An SNP (rs79666294) near the KIF4B gene was identified in the African American cohort. Transethnic evaluation replicated GC and DHCR7 region SNPs. Additionally, the transethnic analyses revealed SNPs rs719700 and rs1410656 near the ANO6/ARID2 and HTR2A genes, respectively.
Conclusions - Ancestry-specific and transethnic GWASs of 25(OH)D confirmed findings in GC and DHCR7 for African and Hispanic American samples and revealed findings near KIF4B, ANO6/ARID2, and HTR2A. The biological mechanisms that link these regions with 25(OH)D metabolism warrant further investigation.
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Genome-wide association study of coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque in African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
Divers J, Palmer ND, Langefeld CD, Brown WM, Lu L, Hicks PJ, Smith SC, Xu J, Terry JG, Register TC, Wagenknecht LE, Parks JS, Ma L, Chan GC, Buxbaum SG, Correa A, Musani S, Wilson JG, Taylor HA, Bowden DW, Carr JJ, Freedman BI
(2017) BMC Genet 18: 105
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prevalence, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2017
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CAC) predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite exposure to more severe conventional CVD risk factors, African Americans (AAs) are less likely to develop CAC, and when they do, have markedly lower levels than European Americans. Genetic factors likely contribute to the observed ethnic differences. To identify genes associated with CAC in AAs with type 2 diabetes (T2D), a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina 5 M chip in 691 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants (AA-DHS), with replication in 205 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants with T2D. Genetic association tests were performed on the genotyped and 1000 Genomes-imputed markers separately for each study, and combined in a meta-analysis.
RESULTS - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs11353135 (2q22.1), rs16879003 (6p22.3), rs5014012, rs58071836 and rs10244825 (all on chromosome 7), rs10918777 (9q31.2), rs13331874 (16p13.3) and rs4459623 (18q12.1) were associated with presence and/or quantity of CAC in the AA-DHS and JHS, with meta-analysis p-values ≤8.0 × 10. The strongest result in AA-DHS alone was rs6491315 in the 13q32.1 region (parameter estimate (SE) = -1.14 (0.20); p-value = 9.1 × 10). This GWAS peak replicated a previously reported AA-DHS CAC admixture signal (rs7492028, LOD score 2.8).
CONCLUSIONS - Genetic association between SNPs on chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 9, 16 and 18 and CAC were detected in AAs with T2D from AA-DHS and replicated in the JHS. These data support a role for genetic variation on these chromosomes as contributors to CAC in AAs with T2D, as well as to variation in CAC between populations of African and European ancestry.
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15 MeSH Terms
Admixture mapping of uterine fibroid size and number in African American women.
Bray MJ, Edwards TL, Wellons MF, Jones SH, Hartmann KE, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) Fertil Steril 108: 1034-1042.e26
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Biological Specimen Banks, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cross-Sectional Studies, Databases, Factual, Electronic Health Records, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Heredity, Humans, Leiomyoma, Leiomyomatosis, Linear Models, Logistic Models, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors, Tumor Burden, United States, Uterine Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the relationship between genetic ancestry and uterine fibroid characteristics.
DESIGN - Cross-sectional study.
SETTING - Not applicable.
PATIENT(S) - A total of 609 African American participants with image- or surgery-confirmed fibroids in a biorepository at Vanderbilt University electronic health record biorepository and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults studies were included.
INTERVENTION(S) - None.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) - Outcome measures include fibroid number (single vs. multiple), volume of largest fibroid, and largest fibroid dimension of all fibroid measurements.
RESULT(S) - Global ancestry meta-analyses revealed a significant inverse association between percentage of European ancestry and risk of multiple fibroids (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval 0.66, 0.93; P=6.05 × 10). Local ancestry meta-analyses revealed five suggestive (P<4.80 × 10) admixture mapping peaks in 2q14.3-2q21.1, 3p14.2-3p14.1, 7q32.2-7q33, 10q21.1, 14q24.2-14q24.3, for number of fibroids and one suggestive admixture mapping peak (P<1.97 × 10) in 10q24.1-10q24.32 for volume of largest fibroid. Single variant association meta-analyses of the strongest associated region from admixture mapping of fibroid number (10q21.1) revealed a strong association at single nucleotide polymorphism variant rs12219990 (odds ratio: 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.28, 0.60; P=3.82 × 10) that was significant after correction for multiple testing.
CONCLUSION(S) - Increasing African ancestry is associated with multiple fibroids but not with fibroid size. Local ancestry analyses identified several novel genomic regions not previously associated with fibroid number and increasing volume. Future studies are needed to explore the genetic impact that ancestry plays into the development of fibroid characteristics.
Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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An ancestry-based approach for detecting interactions.
Park DS, Eskin I, Kang EY, Gamazon ER, Eng C, Gignoux CR, Galanter JM, Burchard E, Ye CJ, Aschard H, Eskin E, Halperin E, Zaitlen N
(2018) Genet Epidemiol 42: 49-63
MeSH Terms: African Americans, African Continental Ancestry Group, DNA Methylation, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Gene-Environment Interaction, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Models, Genetic, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2017
BACKGROUND - Epistasis and gene-environment interactions are known to contribute significantly to variation of complex phenotypes in model organisms. However, their identification in human association studies remains challenging for myriad reasons. In the case of epistatic interactions, the large number of potential interacting sets of genes presents computational, multiple hypothesis correction, and other statistical power issues. In the case of gene-environment interactions, the lack of consistently measured environmental covariates in most disease studies precludes searching for interactions and creates difficulties for replicating studies.
RESULTS - In this work, we develop a new statistical approach to address these issues that leverages genetic ancestry, defined as the proportion of ancestry derived from each ancestral population (e.g., the fraction of European/African ancestry in African Americans), in admixed populations. We applied our method to gene expression and methylation data from African American and Latino admixed individuals, respectively, identifying nine interactions that were significant at P<5×10-8. We show that two of the interactions in methylation data replicate, and the remaining six are significantly enriched for low P-values (P<1.8×10-6).
CONCLUSION - We show that genetic ancestry can be a useful proxy for unknown and unmeasured covariates in the search for interaction effects. These results have important implications for our understanding of the genetic architecture of complex traits.
© 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.
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10 MeSH Terms