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Complex regional pain syndrome: practical diagnostic and treatment guidelines, 4th edition.
Harden RN, Oaklander AL, Burton AW, Perez RS, Richardson K, Swan M, Barthel J, Costa B, Graciosa JR, Bruehl S, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association
(2013) Pain Med 14: 180-229
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Analgesics, Opioid, Anesthetics, Local, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Anticonvulsants, Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic, Bone Density Conservation Agents, Complex Regional Pain Syndromes, Humans, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy Modalities, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Recreation Therapy, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Rehabilitation, Vocational
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
OBJECTIVE - This is the fourth edition of diagnostic and treatment guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS; aka reflex sympathetic dystrophy).
METHODS - Expert practitioners in each discipline traditionally utilized in the treatment of CRPS systematically reviewed the available and relevant literature; due to the paucity of levels 1 and 2 studies, less rigorous, preliminary research reports were included. The literature review was supplemented with knowledge gained from extensive empirical clinical experience, particularly in areas where high-quality evidence to guide therapy is lacking.
RESULTS - The research quality, clinical relevance, and "state of the art" of diagnostic criteria or treatment modalities are discussed, sometimes in considerable detail with an eye to the expert practitioner in each therapeutic area. Levels of evidence are mentioned when available, so that the practitioner can better assess and analyze the modality under discussion, and if desired, to personally consider the citations. Tables provide details on characteristics of studies in different subject domains described in the literature.
CONCLUSIONS - In the humanitarian spirit of making the most of all current thinking in the area, balanced by a careful case-by-case analysis of the risk/cost vs benefit analysis, the authors offer these "practical" guidelines.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Norepinephrine depletion of antimicrobial peptides from the skin glands of Xenopus laevis.
Gammill WM, Fites JS, Rollins-Smith LA
(2012) Dev Comp Immunol 37: 19-27
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Animals, Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides, Coloring Agents, Exocrine Glands, Molecular Weight, Norepinephrine, Rosaniline Dyes, Skin, Stress, Physiological, Xenopus Proteins, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
The dermal granular glands of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, contain antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are secreted following local nerve stimulation. These natural antibiotics are active against bacteria and fungi including Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a fungal pathogen that causes the skin disease chytridiomycosis. Granular gland secretion can be stimulated in the laboratory by norepinephrine injection. We found that two injections of 80nmol/g norepinephrine were necessary to fully deplete the AMP stores. One injection resulted in the secretion of most of the stored peptides. A second injection, 2 days later, released a small amount of additional AMPs that are not compositionally different from those released by the first injection. A third injection, 4 days after the first, did not result in further AMP release. Mass spectrometry and histology confirmed that glands are depleted after two injections. Periodic acid-Schiff staining indicated that mucus gland secretion was also induced by norepinephrine.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
alpha2A-adrenergic receptors heterosynaptically regulate glutamatergic transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.
Shields AD, Wang Q, Winder DG
(2009) Neuroscience 163: 339-51
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Animals, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Gene Knock-In Techniques, Glutamic Acid, Guanfacine, Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neurons, Norepinephrine, Organ Culture Techniques, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Septal Nuclei, Stress, Psychological, Substance-Related Disorders, Synaptic Transmission, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Stress is a major driving force in reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) has been identified as a key brain region in this behavior, and receives a dense input of the stress-neurotransmitter norepinephrine through the ventral noradrenergic bundle. Activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(2)-ARs) in the BNST blocks stress-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking, indicating a potentially important role for these receptors. Currently, it is unclear how alpha(2)-AR agonists elicit this behavioral action, or through which alpha(2)-AR subtype. Activation of alpha(2)-ARs decreases glutamatergic transmission in the BNST, an effect which is nearly absent in the alpha(2A)-AR knockout mouse. Here, we take advantage of a knock-in mouse in which a hemagglutinin-tagged alpha(2A)-AR was inserted into the endogenous locus, along with the alpha(2A)-AR selective agonist guanfacine, to further study the role of the alpha(2A)-AR subtype in modulation of neurotransmission in the BNST. Using immunohistochemistry, we find that alpha(2A)-ARs are highly expressed in the BNST, and that this expression is more similar in distribution to the vesicular glutamate transporters than to either norepinephrine transporter or tyrosine hydroxylase positive terminals. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings, we show that guanfacine causes a depression of evoked excitatory and, to a more limited extent, inhibitory fast synaptic transmission. In total, these data support a prominent heterosynaptic role for alpha(2A)-ARs in modulating fast synaptic transmission in the BNST.
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21 MeSH Terms
Effects of variation in the human alpha2A- and alpha2C-adrenoceptor genes on cognitive tasks and pain perception.
Kohli U, Muszkat M, Sofowora GG, Harris PA, Friedman EA, Dupont WD, Scheinin M, Wood AJ, Stein CM, Kurnik D
(2010) Eur J Pain 14: 154-9
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Adult, Cognition, Cold Temperature, Dexmedetomidine, Female, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Humans, Hypnotics and Sedatives, Male, Memory, Pain, Pain Measurement, Pressure, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - The mechanisms underlying interindividual variability in pain perception and cognitive responses are undefined but highly heritable. alpha(2C)- and alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors regulate noradrenergic activity and are important mediators of pain perception and analgesia. We hypothesized that common genetic variants in these genes, particularly the ADRA2C 322-325 deletion variant, affect pain perception or cognitive responses.
METHODS - We studied 73 healthy subjects (37 Caucasians and 36 African-Americans) aged 25.4+/-4.6years. Pain response to a cold pressor test was measured using a 10cm visual analog scale and again on the next day, after three infusions of the selective alpha(2)-agonist dexmedetomidine. Standardized cognitive tests were administered at baseline and after each infusion. The contribution of ADRA2C deletion genotype, dexmedetomidine concentration, and other covariates to pain perception and cognitive responses was determined using multiple linear regression models. Secondary analysis examined the effects of ADRA2A and other ADRA2C variants on pain perception.
RESULTS - ADRA2C Del homozygotes had higher pain scores in response to cold at baseline (6.3+/-1.8cm) and after dexmedetomidine (5.6+/-2.2cm) than insertion allele carriers (4.6+/-2.1cm [baseline] and 3.8+/-1.9cm [after dexmedetomidine]; adjusted P-values=0.019 and 0.004, respectively). Cognitive responses were unrelated to ADRA2C Ins/Del genotype. None of the other ADRA2A and ADRA2C variants was significantly related to cold pain sensitivity before dexmedetomidine; after dexmedetomidine, ADRA2A rs1800038 was marginally associated (P=0.03).
CONCLUSION - The common ADRA2C del322-325 variant affected pain perception before and after dexmedetomidine but did not affect other cognitive responses, suggesting that it contributes to interindividual variability in pain perception.
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20 MeSH Terms
Epitope-tagged receptor knock-in mice reveal that differential desensitization of alpha2-adrenergic responses is because of ligand-selective internalization.
Lu R, Li Y, Zhang Y, Chen Y, Shields AD, Winder DG, Angelotti T, Jiao K, Limbird LE, Zhou Y, Wang Q
(2009) J Biol Chem 284: 13233-43
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Animals, Blotting, Southern, Brain, Calcium, Cells, Cultured, Clonidine, Electrophysiology, Endocytosis, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, GTP-Binding Proteins, Guanfacine, Guanosine 5'-O-(3-Thiotriphosphate), Hemagglutinins, Humans, Immunoenzyme Techniques, Integrases, Kidney, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neurons, Norepinephrine, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Signal Transduction, Sympathetic Nervous System, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added August 13, 2010
Although ligand-selective regulation of G protein-coupled receptor-mediated signaling and trafficking are well documented, little is known about whether ligand-selective effects occur on endogenous receptors or whether such effects modify the signaling response in physiologically relevant cells. Using a gene targeting approach, we generated a knock-in mouse line, in which N-terminal hemagglutinin epitope-tagged alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor (AR) expression was driven by the endogenous mouse alpha(2A)AR gene locus. Exploiting this mouse line, we evaluated alpha(2A)AR trafficking and alpha(2A)AR-mediated inhibition of Ca(2+) currents in native sympathetic neurons in response to clonidine and guanfacine, two drugs used for treatment of hypertension, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and enhancement of analgesia through actions on the alpha(2A)AR subtype. We discovered a more rapid desensitization of Ca(2+) current suppression by clonidine than guanfacine, which paralleled a more marked receptor phosphorylation and endocytosis of alpha(2A)AR evoked by clonidine than by guanfacine. Clonidine-induced alpha(2A)AR desensitization, but not receptor phosphorylation, was attenuated by blockade of endocytosis with concanavalin A, indicating a critical role for internalization of alpha(2A)AR in desensitization to this ligand. Our data on endogenous receptor-mediated signaling and trafficking in native cells reveal not only differential regulation of G protein-coupled receptor endocytosis by different ligands, but also a differential contribution of receptor endocytosis to signaling desensitization. Taken together, our data suggest that these HA-alpha(2A)AR knock-in mice will serve as an important model in developing ligands to favor endocytosis or nonendocytosis of receptors, depending on the target cell and pathophysiology being addressed.
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29 MeSH Terms
alpha2-Adrenergic agonists protect against radiocontrast-induced nephropathy in mice.
Billings FT, Chen SW, Kim M, Park SW, Song JH, Wang S, Herman J, D'Agati V, Lee HT
(2008) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 295: F741-8
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Animals, Cell Line, Clonidine, Contrast Media, Dexmedetomidine, Iohexol, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Medulla, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Renal Circulation
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Radiocontrast nephropathy (RCN) is a common clinical problem for which there is no effective therapy. Utilizing a murine model, we tested the hypothesis that alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonists (clonidine and dexmedetomidine) protect against RCN induced with iohexol (a nonionic low-osmolar radiocontrast). C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with saline, clonidine, or dexmedetomidine before induction of RCN. Some mice were pretreated with yohimbine (a selective alpha(2)-receptor antagonist) before saline, clonidine, or dexmedetomidine administration. alpha(2)-Agonist-treated mice had reduced plasma creatinine, renal tubular necrosis, renal apoptosis, and renal cortical proximal tubule vacuolization 24 h after iohexol injection. Yohimbine reversed the protective effects of clonidine and dexmedetomidine pretreatment. Injection of iohexol resulted in a rapid ( approximately 90 min) fall of renal outer medullary blood flow. Clonidine and dexmedetomidine pretreatment significantly attenuated this perfusion decrease without changing systemic blood pressure. To determine whether proximal tubular alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors mediate the cytoprotective effects, we treated cultured human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells and rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with iohexol after vehicle, clonidine, or dexmedetomidine pretreatment. Iohexol caused a direct dose-dependent reduction of HK-2 and rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell viability, but alpha(2)-agonists failed to preserve the viability of both cell types. We conclude that alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonists protect mice against RCN by preserving outer medullary renal blood flow. As alpha(2)-agonists are widely utilized during the perioperative period, our findings may have significant clinical relevance to improving outcomes following radiocontrast exposure.
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13 MeSH Terms
Ethnic and genetic determinants of cardiovascular response to the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine.
Kurnik D, Muszkat M, Sofowora GG, Friedman EA, Dupont WD, Scheinin M, Wood AJ, Stein CM
(2008) Hypertension 51: 406-11
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular System, Cytosine, Dexmedetomidine, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins, Humans, Male, Norepinephrine, Osmolar Concentration, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Sequence Deletion, Single-Blind Method, Thymine
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine reduces blood pressure more effectively in White than Black Americans despite similar degrees of sympatholysis. Functional genetic variation in receptor signaling mechanisms, for example in the beta 3 G-protein subunit (GNB3 C825T) and in the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor subtype (ADRA2C del322-325), may affect drug responses. We examined the hypothesis that there are ethnic differences in the responses to the highly selective alpha(2)-agonist, dexmedetomidine, and that these genetic variants contribute to interindividual variability in drug responses. In a placebo-controlled, single-masked study, 73 healthy subjects (37 whites and 36 blacks) received 3 placebo infusions and then 3 incremental doses of dexmedetomidine (cumulative dose, 0.4 microg/kg), each separated by 30 minutes. Blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined after each infusion. We measured dexmedetomidine concentrations after the last infusion and determined ADRA2C del322-325 and GNB3 C825T genotypes. Dexmedetomidine lowered blood pressure and plasma catecholamine concentrations significantly (all P<0.001). There was substantial interindividual variability in the reduction of systolic blood pressure (range, 1 to 34 mm Hg) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (range, 24 to 424 pg/mL). However, there were no differences between black and white subjects in dexmedetomidine responses (P>0.16 for all outcomes) before or after adjustment for covariates. Neither ADRA2C del322-325 nor GNB3 C825T genotypes affected the responses to dexmedetomidine (all P>0.66). There is large interindividual variability in response to the selective alpha(2)-AR agonist dexmedetomidine, and neither ethnicity nor ADRA2C and GNB3 genotypes contribute to it. Further studies to identify determinants of alpha(2)-AR-mediated responses will be of interest.
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21 MeSH Terms
Alpha1-adrenergic receptor-induced heterosynaptic long-term depression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is disrupted in mouse models of affective disorders.
McElligott ZA, Winder DG
(2008) Neuropsychopharmacology 33: 2313-23
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Animals, Brain Chemistry, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Cocaine, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors, Glutamic Acid, Long-Term Synaptic Depression, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mood Disorders, Neural Pathways, Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Organ Culture Techniques, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Receptors, Glutamate, Septal Nuclei, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
The glutamatergic synapse in specific brain regions has been shown to be a site for convergence of stress and addictive substances. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a nucleus that relays between higher order processing centers and classical reward and stress pathways, receives dense noradrenergic inputs that are known to influence behavioral paradigms of both anxiety and stress-induced relapse to drug seeking. Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) within this region have been implicated in modulation of the HPA axis and anxiety responses. We found that application of an alpha(1)-AR agonist produced a long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory transmission in an acute mouse BNST slice preparation. This effect was mimicked by a 20 min, but not a 10 min, application of 100 microM norepinephrine (NE) in a prazosin-sensitive manner. This alpha(1)-AR LTD was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function unlike previously described alpha(1)-AR LTD in the hippocampus and visual cortex; however, it was dependent on the activation of L-type voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs). In addition, alpha(1)-AR LTD was induced independently of the activation of mGluR5 which can also induce LTD in this region. Furthermore, alpha(1)-AR LTD was intact in mice receiving an intraperitoneal injection of cocaine but was disrupted in alpha(2a)-AR and NE transporter (NET) knockout (KO) mice. Thus a loss of this plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in BNST could contribute to affective behavioral phenotypes of these mice.
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24 MeSH Terms
Proteomic exploration of pancreatic islets in mice null for the alpha2A adrenergic receptor.
Hu X, Friedman D, Hill S, Caprioli R, Nicholson W, Powers AC, Hunter L, Limbird LE
(2005) J Mol Endocrinol 35: 73-88
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Sequence, Blood Glucose, Brimonidine Tartrate, DNA, Female, Glucose, In Vitro Techniques, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Islets of Langerhans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Molecular Sequence Data, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Proteins, Proteomics, Quinoxalines, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The present studies extend recent findings that mice null for the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor (alpha(2A) AR KO mice) lack suppression of exogenous secretagogue-stimulated insulin secretion in response to alpha(2) AR agonists by evaluating the endogenous secretagogue, glucose, ex vivo, and providing in vivo data that baseline insulin levels are elevated and baseline glucose levels are decreased in alpha(2A) AR KO mice. These latter findings reveal that the alpha(2A) AR subtype regulates glucose-stimulated insulin release in response to endogenous catecholamines in vivo. The changes in alpha(2A) AR responsiveness and resultant changes in insulin/glucose homeostasis encouraged us to utilize proteomics strategies to identify possible alpha(2A) AR downstream signaling molecules or other resultant changes due to perturbation of alpha(2A) AR expression. Although agonist stimulation of islets from wild type (WT) mice did not significantly alter islet protein profiles, several proteins were enriched in islets from alpha(2A) AR KO mice when compared with those from WT mice, including an enzyme participating in insulin protein processing. The present studies document the important role of the alpha(2A) AR subtype in tonic suppression of insulin release in response to endogenous catecholamines as well as exogenous alpha(2) agonists and provide insights into pleiotropic changes that result from loss of alpha(2A) AR expression and tonic suppression of insulin release.
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25 MeSH Terms
Alpha2B adrenergic receptor 301-303 deletion polymorphism and vascular alpha2 adrenergic receptor response.
Muszkat M, Sofowora GG, Xie HG, Wood AJ, Stein CM
(2005) Pharmacogenet Genomics 15: 23-8
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Agonists, Adult, Dexmedetomidine, Female, Gene Deletion, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Homozygote, Humans, Male, Pharmacogenetics, Polymorphism, Genetic, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Veins
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Postsynaptic alpha2B adrenergic receptors (ARs) mediate vasoconstriction. There is more than 1000-fold variability in vascular sensitivity to an alpha2-AR agonist. Genetic variability may contribute to such interindividual differences in sensitivity. A 301-303 deletion (del) polymorphism has been identified in the coding region of the alpha2B-AR gene and has functional effects in vitro. Thus, we examined the hypothesis that the del301-303 polymorphism contributes to variability in vascular alpha2-AR responses in vivo. Healthy subjects were recruited based on their alpha2B-AR genotype. Their vascular sensitivity was determined using a linear variable differential transformer following the infusion of increasing doses (range 0.01-1000 ng/min) of the alpha2-AR agonist, dexmedetomidine, into a dorsal hand vein. The dose that produced 50% (ED50) of maximum venoconstriction (Emax) was determined for each subject. Vascular response was compared among the three genotypes. Forty-nine subjects were studied [28 wild-type wt/wt, 13 wt/del, 8 del/del]. There was no difference in dexmedetomidine ED50 and Emax among the alpha2B-AR del301-303 genotypes. The ED50 was 1.39 ng/min [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-63.0 ng/min] in wt/wt subjects, 1.63 ng/min (95% CI 0.01-177.8 ng/min) in wt/del and 2.37 ng/min (95% CI 0.17-33.7 ng/min) in del/del (P=0.80). The average Emax was 75.4+/-14.9% in wt/wt, 75.7+/-21.3% in wt/del and 82.2+/-12.9% in del/del subjects (P=0.26). These findings suggest that the del301-303 polymorphism does not contribute significantly to interindividual in vivo variability in response to alpha2-AR activation in the hand vein.
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14 MeSH Terms