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Association of smoking with abdominal adipose deposition and muscle composition in Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) participants at mid-life: A population-based cohort study.
Terry JG, Hartley KG, Steffen LM, Nair S, Alman AC, Wellons MF, Jacobs DR, Tindle HA, Carr JJ
(2020) PLoS Med 17: e1003223
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Fat, Adiposity, Adult, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Life Style, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Factors, Smoking, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
BACKGROUND - Smokers have lower risk of obesity, which some consider a "beneficial" side effect of smoking. However, some studies suggest that smoking is simultaneously associated with higher central adiposity and, more specifically, ectopic adipose deposition. Little is known about the association of smoking with intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), an ectopic adipose depot associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and a key determinant of muscle quality and function. We tested the hypothesis that smokers have higher abdominal IMAT and lower lean muscle quality than never smokers.
METHODS AND FINDINGS - We measured abdominal muscle total, lean, and adipose volumes (in cubic centimeters) and attenuation (in Hounsfield units [HU]) along with subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes using computed tomography (CT) in 3,020 middle-aged Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) participants (age 42-58, 56.3% women, 52.6% white race) at the year 25 (Y25) visit. The longitudinal CARDIA study was initiated in 1985 with the recruitment of young adult participants (aged 18-30 years) equally balanced by female and male sex and black and white race at 4 field centers located in Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Minneapolis, MN, and Oakland, CA. Multivariable linear models included potential confounders such as physical activity and dietary habits along with traditional CVD risk factors. Current smokers had lower BMI than never smokers. Nevertheless, in the fully adjusted multivariable model with potential confounders, including BMI and CVD risk factors, adjusted mean (95% CI) IMAT volume was 2.66 (2.55-2.76) cm3 in current smokers (n = 524), 2.36 (2.29-2.43) cm3 in former smokers (n = 944), and 2.23 (2.18-2.29) cm3 in never smokers (n = 1,552) (p = 0.007 for comparison of former versus never smoker, and p < 0.001 for comparison of current smoker versus never and former smoker). Moreover, compared to participants who never smoked throughout life (41.6 [41.3-41.9] HU), current smokers (40.4 [39.9-40.9] HU) and former smokers (40.8 [40.5-41.2] HU) had lower lean muscle attenuation suggesting lower muscle quality in the fully adjusted model (p < 0.001 for comparison of never smokers with either of the other two strata). Among participants who had ever smoked, pack-years of smoking exposure were directly associated with IMAT volume (β [95% CI]: 0.017 [0.010-0.025]) (p < 0.001). Despite having less SAT, current smokers also had higher VAT/SAT ratio than never smokers. These findings must be viewed with caution as residual confounding and/or reverse causation may contribute to these associations.
CONCLUSIONS - We found that, compared to those who never smoked, current and former smokers had abdominal muscle composition that was higher in adipose tissue volume, a finding consistent with higher CVD risk and age-related physical deconditioning. These findings challenge the belief that smoking-associated weight loss or maintenance confers a health benefit.
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17 MeSH Terms
Associations of Thigh and Abdominal Adipose Tissue Radiodensity with Glucose and Insulin in Nondiabetic African-Ancestry Men.
Tilves C, Zmuda JM, Kuipers AL, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Wheeler V, Peddada SD, Nair S, Miljkovic I
(2020) Obesity (Silver Spring) 28: 404-411
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Blood Glucose, Body Composition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Overweight, Subcutaneous Fat, Thigh, West Indies
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
OBJECTIVE - Decreased radiodensity of adipose tissue (AT) located in the visceral AT (VAT), subcutaneous AT (SAT), and intermuscular AT (IMAT) abdominal depots is associated with hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance independent of AT volumes. These associations were sought in African-ancestry men, who have higher risk for type 2 diabetes and have been underrepresented in previous studies.
METHODS - This cross-sectional analysis included 505 nondiabetic men of African-Caribbean ancestry (median age: 61 years; median BMI: 26.8 kg/m ) from the Tobago Health Study. AT volumes and radiodensities were assessed using computed tomography, including abdominal (VAT and SAT) and thigh (IMAT) depots. Associations between AT radiodensities were assessed with fasting serum glucose and insulin and with insulin resistance (updated homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, HOMA2-IR).
RESULTS - Higher radiodensity in any AT depot was associated with lower log-insulin and log-HOMA2-IR (β range: -0.16 to -0.18 for each; all P < 0.0001). No AT radiodensity was associated with glucose. Thigh IMAT radiodensity associations were independent of, and similar in magnitude to, VAT radiodensities. Model fit statistics suggested that AT radiodensities were a better predictor for insulin and insulin resistance compared with AT volumes in individuals with overweight and obesity.
CONCLUSIONS - AT radiodensities at multiple depots are significantly associated with insulin and insulin resistance in African-ancestry men.
© 2019 The Obesity Society.
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19 MeSH Terms
Adiposity-Independent Effects of Aging on Insulin Sensitivity and Clearance in Mice and Humans.
Ehrhardt N, Cui J, Dagdeviren S, Saengnipanthkul S, Goodridge HS, Kim JK, Lantier L, Guo X, Chen YI, Raffel LJ, Buchanan TA, Hsueh WA, Rotter JI, Goodarzi MO, Péterfy M
(2019) Obesity (Silver Spring) 27: 434-443
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, Adult, Animals, Female, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added May 16, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Aging is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether aging-associated insulin resistance is due to increased adiposity or other age-related factors. To address this question, the impact of aging on insulin sensitivity was investigated independently of changes in body composition.
METHODS - Cohorts of mice aged 4 to 8 months ("young") and 18 to 27 months ("aged") exhibiting similar body composition were characterized for glucose metabolism on chow and high-fat diets. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses. The relationship between aging and insulin resistance in humans was investigated in 1,250 nondiabetic Mexican Americans who underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps.
RESULTS - In mice with similar body composition, age had no detrimental effect on plasma glucose and insulin levels. While aging did not diminish glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps demonstrated impaired insulin sensitivity and reduced insulin clearance in aged mice on chow and high-fat diets. Consistent with results in the mouse, age remained an independent determinant of insulin resistance after adjustment for body composition in Mexican American males.
CONCLUSIONS - This study demonstrates that in addition to altered body composition, adiposity-independent mechanisms also contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance in mice and humans.
© 2019 The Obesity Society.
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9 MeSH Terms
Association Between Regional Adipose Tissue Distribution and Risk of Heart Failure Among Blacks.
Pandey A, Kondamudi N, Patel KV, Ayers C, Simek S, Hall ME, Musani SK, Blackshear C, Mentz RJ, Khan H, Terry JG, Correa A, Butler J, Neeland IJ, Berry JD
(2018) Circ Heart Fail 11: e005629
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, African Americans, Aged, Female, Heart Failure, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Obesity is highly prevalent among blacks and is associated with a greater risk of heart failure (HF). However, the contribution of regional adiposity depots such as visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue toward risk of HF in blacks is unknown.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We included 2602 participants (mean age: 59 years, 35% men) from the Jackson Heart Study without prevalent HF who underwent computed tomography quantification of VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue during the second visit (2005-2009). The associations between different adiposity measures and HF were evaluated using adjusted Cox models. There were 122 incident HF events over a median follow-up of 7.1 years. Higher amounts of VAT were associated with greater risk of HF in age- and sex-adjusted analyses (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-SD higher VAT: 1.29 [1.09-1.52]). This association was attenuated and not significant after additional adjustment for traditional HF risk factors and body mass index. Overall obesity, represented by body mass index, was associated with higher risk of HF independent of risk factors and VAT (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-kg/m higher body mass index: 1.06 [1.02-1.11]). Subcutaneous adipose tissue was not associated with risk of HF in adjusted analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - In a community-dwelling black population, higher amounts of overall and visceral adiposity are associated with higher risk of HF. The association between VAT and HF risk in blacks may reflect differences in traditional HF risk factor burden. Future studies are needed to confirm this observation and clarify the independent role of different measures of adiposity on HF outcomes.
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13 MeSH Terms
Association of abdominal muscle composition with prediabetes and diabetes: The CARDIA study.
Granados A, Gebremariam A, Gidding SS, Terry JG, Carr JJ, Steffen LM, Jacobs DR, Lee JM
(2019) Diabetes Obes Metab 21: 267-275
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Body Composition, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Physical Fitness, Prediabetic State, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
AIM - To evaluate the relationship of abdominal muscle lean tissue and adipose tissue volumes with prediabetes and diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We measured abdominal muscle composition in 3170 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who underwent computed tomography (CT) at Year 25 of follow-up (ages, 43-55 years). Multinomial regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of CT-measured intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), lean muscle tissue (lean) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes with diabetes at any point during the CARDIA study, newly detected prediabetes, prior history of prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance. Models were adjusted for potential confounding factors: age, sex, race, height, smoking status, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, cardiorespiratory fitness and study centre.
RESULTS - Higher IMAT, lean and VAT volumes were all separately associated with a higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes. Inclusion of VAT volume in models with both IMAT volume and lean volume attenuated the association of IMAT with both prediabetes and diabetes, but higher lean volume retained its association with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals in the highest IMAT quartile, coupled with VAT in its lower three quartiles, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, but not of prediabetes, than those with both IMAT and VAT in their respective lower three quartiles. Adjusting for cardiorespiratory fitness did not substantially change the findings.
CONCLUSION - Higher IMAT volume was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes even after adjustment for VAT volume. However, further study is warranted to understand the complicated relationship between abdominal muscle and adipose tissues.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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19 MeSH Terms
Brief Report: Circulating Markers of Immunologic Activity Reflect Adiposity in Persons With HIV on Antiretroviral Therapy.
Koethe JR, Jenkins CA, Furch BD, Lake JE, Barnett L, Hager CC, Smith R, Hulgan T, Shepherd BE, Kalams SA
(2018) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 79: 135-140
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Biomarkers, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2019
BACKGROUND - Obesity alters adipose tissue immunology, and these changes may be reflected in circulating soluble inflammatory biomarker and T-cell subset profiles measured in HIV research studies.
METHODS - We recruited 70 adults with HIV (50% obese) on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine, virologic suppression for >2 years, and no rheumatologic or other known inflammatory conditions. We measured fasting plasma levels of several markers of innate immunity and major CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets. We assessed relationships between measurements of total adiposity [body mass index (BMI), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-quantified fat mass index (FMI), and plasma leptin] and the immunologic parameters using covariate-adjusted Spearman's rank correlations.
RESULTS - The cohort was 43% women, 54% nonwhite, and median age was 45 years. Higher BMI, FMI, and plasma leptin were consistently associated with higher C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and interleukin-6 (P < 0.01 for all), but lower interleukin-10 (P ≤ 0.02 for all). BMI and FMI were positively associated with soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 1 levels (P ≤ 0.02 for both), and a positive correlation approached significance for all 3 body composition measurements with soluble CD163 (P ≤ 0.09 for all). Higher BMI and FMI were associated with lower CD38 expression on CD4 T cells (P ≤ 0.04 for both), but higher CD69 expression (P ≤ 0.01 for BMI and FMI, P = 0.07 for leptin).
CONCLUSIONS - Greater adiposity is associated with alterations in a limited set of circulating immune markers, potentially reflecting changes known to occur in adipose tissue with treated HIV infection. Measuring total fat mass radiographically did not yield substantively different results compared with BMI.
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MeSH Terms
Genome-Wide Study of Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipose Tissue Reveals Novel Sex-Specific Adiposity Loci in Mexican Americans.
Gao C, Langefeld CD, Ziegler JT, Taylor KD, Norris JM, Chen YI, Hellwege JN, Guo X, Allison MA, Speliotes EK, Rotter JI, Bowden DW, Wagenknecht LE, Palmer ND
(2018) Obesity (Silver Spring) 26: 202-212
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Body Mass Index, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Obesity, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to explore the genetic mechanisms of regional fat deposition, which is a strong risk factor for metabolic diseases beyond total adiposity.
METHODS - A genome-wide association study of 7,757,139 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 983 Mexican Americans (n  = 403; n  = 580) from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study was performed. Association analyses were performed with and without sex stratification for subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and visceral-subcutaneous ratio (VSR) obtained from computed tomography.
RESULTS - The strongest signal identified was SNP rs2185405 (minor allele frequencies [MAF] = 40%; P = 1.98 × 10 ) with VAT. It is an intronic variant of the GLIS family zinc finger 3 gene (GLIS3). In addition, SNP rs12657394 (MAF = 19%) was associated with VAT in males (P = 2.39×10 ; P = 2.5 × 10 ). It is located intronically in the serum response factor binding protein 1 gene (SRFBP1). On average, male carriers of the variant had 24.6 cm increased VAT compared with noncarriers. Subsequently, genome-wide SNP-sex interaction analysis was performed. SNP rs10913233 (MAF = 14%; P = 3.07 × 10 ) in PAPPA2 and rs10923724 (MAF = 38%; P = 2.89 × 10 ) upstream of TBX15 were strongly associated with the interaction effect for VSR.
CONCLUSIONS - Six loci were identified with genome-wide significant associations with fat deposition and interactive effects. These results provided genetic evidence for a differential basis of fat deposition between genders.
© 2017 The Obesity Society.
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MeSH Terms
Shared Genetic Control of Brain Activity During Sleep and Insulin Secretion: A Laboratory-Based Family Study.
Morselli LL, Gamazon ER, Tasali E, Cox NJ, Van Cauter E, Davis LK
(2018) Diabetes 67: 155-164
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, Adult, Blood Glucose, Brain, Electroencephalography, Female, Glucose Tolerance Test, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Male, Middle Aged, Pedigree, Sleep
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2017
Over the past 20 years, a large body of experimental and epidemiologic evidence has linked sleep duration and quality to glucose homeostasis, although the mechanistic pathways remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to determine whether genetic variation influencing both sleep and glucose regulation could underlie their functional relationship. We hypothesized that the genetic regulation of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep, a highly heritable trait with fingerprint reproducibility, is correlated with the genetic control of metabolic traits including insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. We tested our hypotheses through univariate and bivariate heritability analyses in a three-generation pedigree with in-depth phenotyping of both sleep EEG and metabolic traits in 48 family members. Our analyses accounted for age, sex, adiposity, and the use of psychoactive medications. In univariate analyses, we found significant heritability for measures of fasting insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, for time spent in slow-wave sleep, and for EEG spectral power in the delta, theta, and sigma ranges. Bivariate heritability analyses provided the first evidence for a shared genetic control of brain activity during deep sleep and fasting insulin secretion rate.
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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14 MeSH Terms
Metabolic Effects of Diet and Exercise in Patients with Moderate to Severe CKD: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
Ikizler TA, Robinson-Cohen C, Ellis C, Headley SAE, Tuttle K, Wood RJ, Evans EE, Milch CM, Moody KA, Germain M, Limkunakul C, Bian A, Stewart TG, Himmelfarb J
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 250-259
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, Aged, Albuminuria, Body Weight, Caloric Restriction, Creatinine, Exercise, F2-Isoprostanes, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Interleukin-6, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Oxygen Consumption, Pilot Projects, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2017
CKD is steadily increasing along with obesity worldwide. Furthermore, obesity is a proinflammatory risk factor for progression of CKD and cardiovascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that implementation of caloric restriction and aerobic exercise is feasible and can improve the proinflammatory metabolic milieu in patients with moderate to severe CKD through a pilot, randomized, 2×2 factorial design trial. Of 122 participants consented, 111 were randomized to receive caloric restriction and aerobic exercise, caloric restriction alone, aerobic exercise alone, or usual care. Of those randomized, 42% were women, 25% were diabetic, and 91% were hypertensive; 104 started intervention, and 92 completed the 4-month study. Primary outcomes were a change from baseline in absolute fat mass, body weight, plasma F-isoprostane concentrations, and peak oxygen uptake (VO). Compared with usual care, the combined intervention led to statistically significant decreases in body weight and body fat percentage. Caloric restriction alone also led to significant decreases in these measures, but aerobic exercise alone did not. The combined intervention and each independent intervention also led to significant decreases in F-isoprostane and IL-6 concentrations. No intervention produced significant changes in VO, kidney function, or urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. In conclusion, 4-month dietary calorie restriction and aerobic exercise had significant, albeit clinically modest, benefits on body weight, fat mass, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in patients with moderate to severe CKD. These results suggest healthy lifestyle interventions as a nonpharmacologic strategy to improve markers of metabolic health in these patients.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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18 MeSH Terms
Intermuscular Adipose Tissue and Subclinical Coronary Artery Calcification in Midlife: The CARDIA Study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults).
Terry JG, Shay CM, Schreiner PJ, Jacobs DR, Sanchez OA, Reis JP, Goff DC, Gidding SS, Steffen LM, Carr JJ
(2017) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 37: 2370-2378
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Asymptomatic Diseases, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Pericardium, Prevalence, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Excess deposition of fat within and around vital organs and nonadipose tissues is hypothesized to contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We evaluated the association of abdominal intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) volume with coronary artery calcification in the CARDIA study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) participants.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - We measured IMAT in the abdominal muscles, visceral adipose tissue and pericardial adipose tissue, and coronary artery calcification using computed tomography in 3051 CARDIA participants (56% women) at the CARDIA year 25 examination (2010-2011). Mean IMAT volume and mean IMAT/total muscle volume (IMAT normalized for muscle size) were calculated in a 10-mm block of slices centered at L3-L4. Multivariable analyses included potential confounders and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Compared with the lowest quartile, the upper quartile of abdominal IMAT volume was associated with higher coronary artery calcification prevalence (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.6 [1.2-2.1]) after adjusting for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results were similar for highest versus lowest quartile of IMAT normalized to total muscle volume (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.5 [1.1-2.0]). Significant associations of higher IMAT and normalized IMAT with coronary artery calcification prevalence persisted when body mass index, visceral adipose tissue, or pericardial adipose tissue were added to the models.
CONCLUSIONS - In a large, community-based, cross-sectional study, we found that higher abdominal skeletal muscle adipose tissue volume was associated with subclinical atherosclerosis independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and other adipose depots.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
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25 MeSH Terms