Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 561

Publication Record

Connections

AXL Mediates Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion through Regulation of Extracellular Acidification and Lysosome Trafficking.
Maacha S, Hong J, von Lersner A, Zijlstra A, Belkhiri A
(2018) Neoplasia 20: 1008-1022
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Benzocycloheptenes, Biological Transport, Cathepsin B, Cell Line, Tumor, Chick Embryo, Chorioallantoic Membrane, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Lactates, Lysosomes, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Symporters, Triazoles
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy that is characterized by resistance to chemotherapy and a poor clinical outcome. The overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is frequently associated with unfavorable prognosis in EAC. Although it is well documented that AXL mediates cancer cell invasion as a downstream effector of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this process is not completely understood. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that AXL mediates cell invasion through the regulation of lysosomes peripheral distribution and cathepsin B secretion in EAC cell lines. Furthermore, we show that AXL-dependent peripheral distribution of lysosomes and cell invasion are mediated by extracellular acidification, which is potentiated by AXL-induced secretion of lactate through AKT-NF-κB-dependent MCT-1 regulation. Our novel mechanistic findings support future clinical studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the AXL inhibitor R428 (BGB324) in highly invasive EAC.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Associations among histological characteristics and patient outcomes in colorectal carcinoma with a mucinous component.
Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Washington K
(2019) Histopathology 74: 406-414
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
AIMS - Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) often has a mucinous component, with more than 50% mucin by volume defining the mucinous subtype of CRC. The prognostic impact of the mucinous phenotype remains unclear.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We evaluated 224 CRC with at least 5% mucinous component (herein 'mCRC') for patient sex, age, race and outcome; tumour size, location, stage and microsatellite instability (MSI) status; percentage of glands producing mucin; percentage of tumour volume composed of mucin; whether tumoral epithelium floated in mucin pools; tumour budding; signet ring cells (SRCs); and peritumoural inflammation (PI). We related these features to disease-specific survival and compared outcomes to 499 stage-matched, conventional colorectal adenocarcinomas. Factors predicting worse prognosis in mCRC on univariable analysis included non-MSI-high status (P = 0.0008), SRC (P = 0.0017) and lack of PI (P = 0.0034). No parameters were independently associated with outcome after adjusting for tumour stage in multivariate analysis. The percentage of glands producing mucin and percentage tumour volume composed of mucin did not affect prognosis, including at the recommended 50% cut-off for subtyping mCRC. Disease-specific survival for mCRC and adenocarcinomas were similar after accounting for stage.
CONCLUSIONS - Stage-matched mCRCs and adenocarcinomas have similar outcomes, with no prognostic significance to morphological subtyping. Histological characteristics of mCRC, including percentage of tumour volume comprised of mucin, were not predictive of outcome.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
ARID1A Maintains Differentiation of Pancreatic Ductal Cells and Inhibits Development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Mice.
Kimura Y, Fukuda A, Ogawa S, Maruno T, Takada Y, Tsuda M, Hiramatsu Y, Araki O, Nagao M, Yoshikawa T, Ikuta K, Yoshioka T, Wang Z, Akiyama H, Wright CV, Takaori K, Uemoto S, Chiba T, Seno H
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 194-209.e2
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma in Situ, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Differentiation, DNA-Binding Proteins, Mice, Nuclear Proteins, Pancreatic Ducts, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), SOX9 Transcription Factor
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
BACKGROUND & AIMS - The ARID1A gene encodes a protein that is part of the large adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF and is frequently mutated in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We investigated the functions of ARID1A during formation of PDACs in mice.
METHODS - We performed studies with Ptf1a-Cre;Kras mice, which express activated Kras in the pancreas and develop pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), as well as those with disruption of Aird1a (Ptf1a-Cre;Kras;Arid1a mice) or disruption of Brg1 (encodes a catalytic ATPase of the SWI/SNF complex) (Ptf1a-Cre;Kras; Brg1mice). Pancreatic ductal cells (PDCs) were isolated from Arid1a mice and from Arid1a;SOX9OE mice, which overexpress human SOX9 upon infection with an adenovirus-expressing Cre recombinase. Pancreatic tissues were collected from all mice and analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry; cells were isolated and grown in 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional cultures. We performed microarray analyses to compare gene expression patterns in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) from the different strains of mice. We obtained 58 samples of IPMNs and 44 samples of PDACs from patients who underwent pancreatectomy in Japan and analyzed them by immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS - Ptf1a-Cre;Kras mice developed PanINs, whereas Ptf1a-Cre;Kras;Arid1a mice developed IPMNs and PDACs; IPMNs originated from PDCs. ARID1A-deficient IPMNs did not express SOX9. ARID1A-deficient PDCs had reduced expression of SOX9 and dedifferentiated in culture. Overexpression of SOX9 in these cells allowed them to differentiate and prevented dilation of ducts. Among mice with pancreatic expression of activated Kras, those with disruption of Arid1a developed fewer PDACs from IPMNs than mice with disruption of Brg1. ARID1A-deficient IPMNs had reduced activity of the mTOR pathway. Human IPMN and PDAC specimens had reduced levels of ARID1A, SOX9, and phosphorylated S6 (a marker of mTOR pathway activation). Levels of ARID1A correlated with levels of SOX9 and phosphorylated S6.
CONCLUSIONS - ARID1A regulates expression of SOX9, activation of the mTOR pathway, and differentiation of PDCs. ARID1A inhibits formation of PDACs from IPMNs in mice with pancreatic expression of activated KRAS and is down-regulated in IPMN and PDAC tissues from patients.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Gene and MicroRNA Perturbations of Cellular Response to Pemetrexed Implicate Biological Networks and Enable Imputation of Response in Lung Adenocarcinoma.
Gamazon ER, Trendowski MR, Wen Y, Wing C, Delaney SM, Huh W, Wong S, Cox NJ, Dolan ME
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 733
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Line, Tumor, Drug Resistance, Epithelial Cells, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Lymphocytes, MicroRNAs, Models, Biological, Pemetrexed
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
Pemetrexed is indicated for non-small cell lung carcinoma and mesothelioma, but often has limited efficacy due to drug resistance. To probe the molecular mechanisms underlying chemotherapeutic response, we performed mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of pemetrexed treated and untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and applied a hierarchical Bayesian method. We identified genetic variation associated with gene expression in human lung tissue for the most significant differentially expressed genes (Benjamini-Hochberg [BH] adjusted p < 0.05) using the Genotype-Tissue Expression data and found evidence for their clinical relevance using integrated molecular profiling and lung adenocarcinoma survival data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We identified 39 miRNAs with significant differential expression (BH adjusted p < 0.05) in LCLs. We developed a gene expression based imputation model of drug sensitivity, quantified its prediction performance, and found a significant correlation of the imputed phenotype generated from expression data with survival time in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Differentially expressed genes (MTHFD2 and SUFU) that are putative targets of differentially expressed miRNAs also showed differential perturbation in A549 fusion lung tumor cells with further replication in A549 cells. Our study suggests pemetrexed may be used in combination with agents that target miRNAs to increase its cytotoxicity.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
The Impact of Smoking and TP53 Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients with Targetable Mutations-The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC2).
Aisner DL, Sholl LM, Berry LD, Rossi MR, Chen H, Fujimoto J, Moreira AL, Ramalingam SS, Villaruz LC, Otterson GA, Haura E, Politi K, Glisson B, Cetnar J, Garon EB, Schiller J, Waqar SN, Sequist LV, Brahmer J, Shyr Y, Kugler K, Wistuba II, Johnson BE, Minna JD, Kris MG, Bunn PA, Kwiatkowski DJ, LCMC2 investigators
(2018) Clin Cancer Res 24: 1038-1047
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinogenesis, DNA Mutational Analysis, Female, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Smoking, Survival Analysis, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Multiplex genomic profiling is standard of care for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC) is a multi-institutional effort to identify and treat oncogenic driver events in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. Sixteen U.S. institutions enrolled 1,367 patients with lung cancer in LCMC2; 904 were deemed eligible and had at least one of 14 cancer-related genes profiled using validated methods including genotyping, massively parallel sequencing, and IHC. The use of targeted therapies in patients with or p.V600E mutations, , or rearrangements, or amplification was associated with a survival increment of 1.5 years compared with those with such mutations not receiving targeted therapy, and 1.0 year compared with those lacking a targetable driver. Importantly, 60 patients with a history of smoking derived similar survival benefit from targeted therapy for alterations in //, when compared with 75 never smokers with the same alterations. In addition, coexisting mutations were associated with shorter survival among patients with , or alterations. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung and an oncogenic driver mutation treated with effective targeted therapy have a longer survival, regardless of prior smoking history. Molecular testing should be performed on all individuals with lung adenocarcinomas irrespective of clinical characteristics. Routine use of massively parallel sequencing enables detection of both targetable driver alterations and tumor suppressor gene and other alterations that have potential significance for therapy selection and as predictive markers for the efficacy of treatment. .
©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Nodal Disease in Rectal Cancer Patients With Complete Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Danger Below Calm Waters.
Baucom RB, Maguire LH, Kavalukas SL, Geiger TM, Ford MM, Muldoon RL, Hopkins MB, Hawkins AT
(2017) Dis Colon Rectum 60: 1260-1266
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Case-Control Studies, Chemoradiotherapy, Combined Modality Therapy, Female, Humans, Lymphatic Metastasis, Male, Middle Aged, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Staging, Neoplasm, Residual, Rectal Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 14, 2017
BACKGROUND - A subset of patients with rectal cancer who undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy will develop a complete pathologic tumor response. Complete nodal response is not universal in these patients and is difficult to assess clinically. Quantifying the risk of nodal disease would allow for targeted therapy with either radical resection or "watchful waiting."
OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to identify risk factors for residual nodal disease in ypT0 rectal adenocarcinoma.
DESIGN - This is a retrospective case control study.
SETTINGS - The National Cancer Database 2006 to 2014 was used to identify patients for this study.
PATIENTS - Patients with stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma who completed chemoradiation therapy followed by resection and who had ypT0 tumors were included. Patients with metastatic disease and <2 lymph nodes evaluated were excluded. Patients were divided into 2 groups: node positive and node negative.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - The main outcome was nodal disease. The secondary outcome was overall survival.
RESULTS - A total of 42,257 patients with stage II/III rectal cancer underwent chemoradiation therapy and radical resection; 4170 (9.9%) patients had ypT0 tumors and 395 (9.5%) were node positive. Of patients with clinically node-negative disease (ie, pretreatment imaging), 6.2% were node positive after chemoradiation therapy and resection. In multivariable analysis, factors predictive of nodal disease included increasing (pretreatment) clinical N-stage, high tumor grade (3/4), perineural invasion, and lymphovascular invasion. Higher clinical T-stage was inversely associated with residual nodal disease. Overall 5-year survival was significantly different between patients with ypN0, ypN1, and ypN2 disease (87.4%, 82.2%, and 62.5%, p = 0.002).
LIMITATIONS - This study was limited by the lack of clinical detail in the database and the inability to assess recurrence.
CONCLUSIONS - Ten percent of patients with ypT0 tumors had positive nodes after chemoradiation therapy and resection. Factors associated with residual nodal disease included clinical nodal disease at diagnosis and poor histologic features. Patients with any of these features should consider radical resection regardless of tumor response. Others could be suitable for "watchful waiting" strategies. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A458.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
The gastric microbiome, its interaction with Helicobacter pylori, and its potential role in the progression to stomach cancer.
Noto JM, Peek RM
(2017) PLoS Pathog 13: e1006573
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Disease Progression, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 14, 2018
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Barriers to laparoscopic colon resection for cancer: a national analysis.
Hawkins AT, Ford MM, Benjamin Hopkins M, Muldoon RL, Wanderer JP, Parikh AA, Geiger TM
(2018) Surg Endosc 32: 1035-1042
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Colonic Neoplasms, Databases, Factual, Female, Humans, Insurance Coverage, Laparoscopy, Male, Middle Aged, Morbidity, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 14, 2017
BACKGROUND - Level one evidence has shown that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for colon cancer improves short-term outcomes with equivalent long-term oncologic results when compared to open surgery. However, the adoption of MIS for patients with colon cancer has not been universal. The goal of this study is to identify barriers to the use of MIS surgery in colon cancer resection across the United States.
METHODS - The National Cancer Database was queried for all cases of colonic adenocarcinoma resection from 2010 to 2012. Patients undergoing an MIS approach were compared with those undergoing open surgery (OS). MIS was defined as either robotic or laparoscopic surgery. Patients with metastatic disease, surgery for palliation, or tumors >8 cm were excluded. Multivariable modeling was used to identify variables associated with the use of open surgery.
RESULTS - After applying exclusion criteria, 124,205 cases were identified. An MIS approach was used in only 54,621 (44%) patients. In a multivariable model adjusting for stage and tumor size, a number of important factors were associated with decreased odds of a MIS approach including black race (OR .91; p < .0001), lack of insurance (OR .51; p < .0001), lower education (OR .88; p < .0001), lower income (OR .83; p < .0001), treatment at a community program (OR .86; p < .0001), and treatment at a low-volume center (OR .79; p < .0001). Utilization of MIS increased over the study period (2010: 38.7%, 2011: 44.0%, 2012: 49.1%; p < .0001).
CONCLUSIONS - MIS approach is utilized in less than half of all colon resections in this national database, which accounts for over 70% of all diagnosed cancers in the US. Significant variability exists among age, race, insurance status, socioeconomic status, region, and facility type. In light of the recognized benefits of the MIS approach, local and national policy should focus on narrowing these disparities and continuing the upward trend of MIS utilization.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Masquerading as Sigmoid Adenocarcinoma: A Unique Presentation of High-Grade Serous Carcinoma Arising from Endometriosis.
Johnson WR, Kensinger CD, Desai MA, Hawkins AT
(2017) Am Surg 83: e316-317
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Aged, Biopsy, Needle, Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous, Diagnosis, Differential, Endometrial Neoplasms, Endometriosis, Female, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Risk Assessment, Sigmoid Neoplasms, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Treatment Outcome
Added December 14, 2017
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Loss of claudin-3 expression induces IL6/gp130/Stat3 signaling to promote colon cancer malignancy by hyperactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.
Ahmad R, Kumar B, Chen Z, Chen X, Müller D, Lele SM, Washington MK, Batra SK, Dhawan P, Singh AB
(2017) Oncogene 36: 6592-6604
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Claudin-3, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cytokine Receptor gp130, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Permeability, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Up-Regulation, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The hyperactivated Wnt/β-catenin signaling acts as a switch to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition and promote colorectal cancer. However, due to its essential role in gut homeostasis, therapeutic targeting of this pathway has proven challenging. Additionally, IL-6/Stat-3 signaling, activated by microbial translocation through the dysregulated mucosal barrier in colon adenomas, facilitates the adenoma to adenocarcinomas transition. However, inter-dependence between these signaling pathways and key mucosal barrier components in regulating colon tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. In current study, we have discovered, using a comprehensive investigative regimen, a novel and tissue-specific role of claudin-3, a tight junction integral protein, in inhibiting colon cancer progression by serving as the common rheostat of Stat-3 and Wnt-signaling activation. Loss of claudin-3 also predicted poor patient survival. These findings however contrasted an upregulated claudin-3 expression in other cancer types and implicated role of the epigenetic regulation. Claudin-3-/- mice revealed dedifferentiated and leaky colonic epithelium, and developed invasive adenocarcinoma when subjected to colon cancer. Wnt-signaling hyperactivation, albeit in GSK-3β independent manner, differentiated colon cancer in claudin-3-/- mice versus WT-mice. Claudin-3 loss also upregulated the gp130/IL6/Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelium potentially assisted by infiltrating immune components. Genetic and pharmacological studies confirmed that claudin-3 loss induces Wnt/β-catenin activation, which is further exacerbated by Stat-3-activation and help promote colon cancer. Overall, these novel findings identify claudin-3 as a therapeutic target for inhibiting overactivation of Wnt-signaling to prevent CRC malignancy.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms