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Molecular and epidemiologic characterization of Wilms tumor from Baghdad, Iraq.
Phelps HM, Al-Jadiry MF, Corbitt NM, Pierce JM, Li B, Wei Q, Flores RR, Correa H, Uccini S, Frangoul H, Alsaadawi AR, Al-Badri SAF, Al-Darraji AF, Al-Saeed RM, Al-Hadad SA, Lovvorn Iii HN
(2018) World J Pediatr 14: 585-593
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Child, Preschool, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Female, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, Iraq, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, Mutation, N-Myc Proto-Oncogene Protein, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules, Nuclear Proteins, Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins, Receptors, Retinoic Acid, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, WT1 Proteins, Wilms Tumor, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added January 28, 2019
BACKGROUND - Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide, yet its incidence and clinical behavior vary according to race and access to adequate healthcare resources. To guide and streamline therapy in the war-torn and resource-constrained city of Baghdad, Iraq, we conducted a first-ever molecular analysis of 20 WT specimens to characterize the biological features of this lethal disease within this challenged population.
METHODS - Next-generation sequencing of ten target genes associated with WT development and treatment resistance (WT1, CTNNB1, WTX, IGF2, CITED1, SIX2, p53, N-MYC, CRABP2, and TOP2A) was completed. Immunohistochemistry was performed for 6 marker proteins of WT (WT1, CTNNB1, NCAM, CITED1, SIX2, and p53). Patient outcomes were compiled.
RESULTS - Mutations were detected in previously described WT "hot spots" (e.g., WT1 and CTNNB1) as well as novel loci that may be unique to the Iraqi population. Immunohistochemistry showed expression domains most typical of blastemal-predominant WT. Remarkably, despite the challenges facing families and care providers, only one child, with combined WT1 and CTNNB1 mutations, was confirmed dead from disease. Median clinical follow-up was 40.5 months (range 6-78 months).
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that WT biology within a population of Iraqi children manifests features both similar to and unique from disease variants in other regions of the world. These observations will help to risk stratify WT patients living in this difficult environment to more or less intensive therapies and to focus treatment on cell-specific targets.
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27 MeSH Terms
Differential Expression of NF2 in Neuroepithelial Compartments Is Necessary for Mammalian Eye Development.
Moon KH, Kim HT, Lee D, Rao MB, Levine EM, Lim DS, Kim JW
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 13-28.e3
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Lineage, Cell Polarity, Cells, Cultured, Cilia, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Humans, Hyperplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neural Stem Cells, Neurofibromin 2, Organogenesis, Phenotype, Phosphoproteins, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Retinal Pigment Epithelium, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
The optic neuroepithelial continuum of vertebrate eye develops into three differentially growing compartments: the retina, the ciliary margin (CM), and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Neurofibromin 2 (Nf2) is strongly expressed in slowly expanding RPE and CM compartments, and the loss of mouse Nf2 causes hyperplasia in these compartments, replicating the ocular abnormalities seen in human NF2 patients. The hyperplastic ocular phenotypes were largely suppressed by heterozygous deletion of Yap and Taz, key targets of the Nf2-Hippo signaling pathway. We also found that, in addition to feedback transcriptional regulation of Nf2 by Yap/Taz in the CM, activation of Nf2 expression by Mitf in the RPE and suppression by Sox2 in retinal progenitor cells are necessary for the differential growth of the corresponding cell populations. Together, our findings reveal that Nf2 is a key player that orchestrates the differential growth of optic neuroepithelial compartments during vertebrate eye development.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 promotes glutamine metabolism in tumors by activating the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ.
Edwards DN, Ngwa VM, Wang S, Shiuan E, Brantley-Sieders DM, Kim LC, Reynolds AB, Chen J
(2017) Sci Signal 10:
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Amino Acid Transport System ASC, Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Ephrin-A2, Female, Glutaminase, Glutamine, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Minor Histocompatibility Antigens, Muscle Proteins, Phosphoproteins, Transcription Factors, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Malignant tumors reprogram cellular metabolism to support cancer cell proliferation and survival. Although most cancers depend on a high rate of aerobic glycolysis, many cancer cells also display addiction to glutamine. Glutamine transporters and glutaminase activity are critical for glutamine metabolism in tumor cells. We found that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 activated the TEAD family transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (YAP/TAZ), likely in a ligand-independent manner, to promote glutamine metabolism in cells and mouse models of HER2-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of EphA2 induced the nuclear accumulation of YAP and TAZ and increased the expression of YAP/TAZ target genes. Inhibition of the GTPase Rho or the kinase ROCK abolished EphA2-dependent YAP/TAZ nuclear localization. Silencing or substantially reduced the amount of intracellular glutamate through decreased expression of and , respectively, genes that encode proteins that promote glutamine uptake and metabolism. The regulatory DNA elements of both and contain TEAD binding sites and were bound by TEAD4 in an EphA2-dependent manner. In patient breast cancer tissues, expression positively correlated with that of and , as well as that of and Although high expression of predicted enhanced metastatic potential and poor patient survival, it also rendered HER2-positive breast cancer cells more sensitive to glutaminase inhibition. The findings define a previously unknown mechanism of EphA2-mediated glutaminolysis through YAP/TAZ activation in HER2-positive breast cancer and identify potential therapeutic targets in patients.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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MeSH Terms
RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance.
Liu M, Zhang Z, Sampson L, Zhou X, Nalapareddy K, Feng Y, Akunuru S, Melendez J, Davis AK, Bi F, Geiger H, Xin M, Zheng Y
(2017) Stem Cell Reports 9: 1961-1975
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Epiregulin, Epithelium, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Intestine, Small, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Morphogenesis, Phosphoproteins, Stem Cells, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin, rho GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG) expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A) mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnb mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Structure of Myo7b/USH1C complex suggests a general PDZ domain binding mode by MyTH4-FERM myosins.
Li J, He Y, Weck ML, Lu Q, Tyska MJ, Zhang M
(2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114: E3776-E3785
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Caco-2 Cells, Humans, Multiprotein Complexes, Myosins, PDZ Domains, Protein Structure, Quaternary
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Unconventional myosin 7a (Myo7a), myosin 7b (Myo7b), and myosin 15a (Myo15a) all contain MyTH4-FERM domains (myosin tail homology 4-band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin; MF) in their cargo binding tails and are essential for the growth and function of microvilli and stereocilia. Numerous mutations have been identified in the MyTH4-FERM tandems of these myosins in patients suffering visual and hearing impairment. Although a number of MF domain binding partners have been identified, the molecular basis of interactions with the C-terminal MF domain (CMF) of these myosins remains poorly understood. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of Myo7b CMF in complex with the extended PDZ3 domain of USH1C (a.k.a., Harmonin), revealing a previously uncharacterized interaction mode both for MyTH4-FERM tandems and for PDZ domains. We predicted, based on the structure of the Myo7b CMF/USH1C PDZ3 complex, and verified that Myo7a CMF also binds to USH1C PDZ3 using a similar mode. The structure of the Myo7b CMF/USH1C PDZ complex provides mechanistic explanations for >20 deafness-causing mutations in Myo7a CMF. Taken together, these findings suggest that binding to PDZ domains, such as those from USH1C, PDZD7, and Whirlin, is a common property of CMFs of Myo7a, Myo7b, and Myo15a.
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7 MeSH Terms
The major miR-31 target genes STK40 and LATS2 and their implications in the regulation of keratinocyte growth and hair differentiation.
Luan L, Shi J, Yu Z, Andl T
(2017) Exp Dermatol 26: 497-504
MeSH Terms: 3' Untranslated Regions, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Apoptosis, Carcinoma, Basal Cell, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cell Survival, Hair Follicle, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Keratinocytes, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, MicroRNAs, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Skin, Skin Neoplasms, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added June 21, 2017
Emerging evidence indicates that even subtle changes in the expression of key genes of signalling pathways can have profound effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are masters of subtlety and generally have only mild effects on their target genes. The microRNA miR-31 is one of the major microRNAs in many cutaneous conditions associated with activated keratinocytes, such as the hyperproliferative diseases psoriasis, non-melanoma skin cancer and hair follicle growth. miR-31 is a marker of the hair growth phase, and in our miR-31 transgenic mouse model it impairs the function of keratinocytes. This leads to aberrant proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation that results in altered hair growth, while the loss of miR-31 leads to increased hair growth. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we have defined a set of conserved miR-31 target genes, including LATS2 and STK40, which serve as new players in the regulation of keratinocyte growth and hair follicle biology. LATS2 can regulate growth of keratinocytes and we have identified a function of STK40 that can promote the expression of key hair follicle programme regulators such as HR, DLX3 and HOXC13.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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22 MeSH Terms
Interaction of phosphorylated Rab11-FIP2 with Eps15 regulates apical junction composition.
Lapierre LA, Manning EH, Mitchell KM, Caldwell CM, Goldenring JR
(2017) Mol Biol Cell 28: 1088-1100
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cadherins, Carrier Proteins, Cell Polarity, Dogs, Endosomes, Epithelial Cells, Gene Knockout Techniques, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intercellular Junctions, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Membrane Proteins, Occludin, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Protein Transport, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
MARK2 regulates the establishment of polarity in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in part through phosphorylation of serine 227 of Rab11-FIP2. We identified Eps15 as an interacting partner of phospho-S227-Rab11-FIP2 (pS227-FIP2). During recovery from low calcium, Eps15 localized to the lateral membrane before pS227-FIP2 arrival. Later in recovery, Eps15 and pS227-FIP2 colocalized at the lateral membrane. In MDCK cells expressing the pseudophosphorylated FIP2 mutant FIP2(S227E), during recovery from low calcium, Eps15 was trapped and never localized to the lateral membrane. Mutation of any of the three NPF domains within GFP-FIP2(S227E) rescued Eps15 localization at the lateral membrane and reestablished single-lumen cyst formation in GFP-FIP2(S227E)-expressing cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Whereas expression of GFP-FIP2(S227E) induced the loss of E-cadherin and occludin, mutation of any of the NPF domains of GFP-FIP2(S227E) reestablished both proteins at the apical junctions. Knockdown of Eps15 altered the spatial and temporal localization of pS227-FIP2 and also elicited formation of multiple lumens in MDCK 3D cysts. Thus an interaction of Eps15 and pS227-FIP2 at the appropriate time and location in polarizing cells is necessary for proper establishment of epithelial polarity.
© 2017 Lapierre et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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19 MeSH Terms
Clostridium difficile Toxin A Undergoes Clathrin-Independent, PACSIN2-Dependent Endocytosis.
Chandrasekaran R, Kenworthy AK, Lacy DB
(2016) PLoS Pathog 12: e1006070
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Blotting, Western, Caco-2 Cells, Clathrin, Clostridium Infections, Clostridium difficile, Endocytosis, Enterotoxins, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Gene Knockdown Techniques, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Mice, Microscopy, Confocal, Protein Transport, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Transfection, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Clostridium difficile infection affects a significant number of hospitalized patients in the United States. Two homologous exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, are the major virulence factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. The toxins are glucosyltransferases that inactivate Rho family-GTPases to disrupt host cellular function and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Toxicity depends on receptor binding and subsequent endocytosis. TcdB has been shown to enter cells by clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but the mechanism of TcdA uptake is still unclear. Here, we utilize a combination of RNAi-based knockdown, pharmacological inhibition, and cell imaging approaches to investigate the endocytic mechanism(s) that contribute to TcdA uptake and subsequent cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. We show that TcdA uptake and cellular intoxication is dynamin-dependent but does not involve clathrin- or caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Confocal microscopy using fluorescently labeled TcdA shows significant colocalization of the toxin with PACSIN2-positive structures in cells during entry. Disruption of PACSIN2 function by RNAi-based knockdown approaches inhibits TcdA uptake and toxin-induced downstream effects in cells indicating that TcdA entry is PACSIN2-dependent. We conclude that TcdA and TcdB utilize distinct endocytic mechanisms to intoxicate host cells.
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21 MeSH Terms
LIM-Only Protein 4 (LMO4) and LIM Domain Binding Protein 1 (LDB1) Promote Growth and Metastasis of Human Head and Neck Cancer (LMO4 and LDB1 in Head and Neck Cancer).
Simonik EA, Cai Y, Kimmelshue KN, Brantley-Sieders DM, Loomans HA, Andl CD, Westlake GM, Youngblood VM, Chen J, Yarbrough WG, Brown BT, Nagarajan L, Brandt SJ
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0164804
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Cell Proliferation, DNA-Binding Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, LIM Domain Proteins, Mice, Mouth Neoplasms, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Transplantation, Tissue Culture Techniques, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) accounts for more than 300,000 deaths worldwide per year as a consequence of tumor cell invasion of adjacent structures or metastasis. LIM-only protein 4 (LMO4) and LIM-domain binding protein 1 (LDB1), two directly interacting transcriptional adaptors that have important roles in normal epithelial cell differentiation, have been associated with increased metastasis, decreased differentiation, and shortened survival in carcinoma of the breast. Here, we implicate two LDB1-binding proteins, single-stranded binding protein 2 (SSBP2) and 3 (SSBP3), in controlling LMO4 and LDB1 protein abundance in HNSCC and in regulating specific tumor cell functions in this disease. First, we found that the relative abundance of LMO4, LDB1, and the two SSBPs correlated very significantly in a panel of human HNSCC cell lines. Second, expression of these proteins in tumor primaries and lymph nodes involved by metastasis were concordant in 3 of 3 sets of tissue. Third, using a Matrigel invasion and organotypic reconstruct assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of LDB1 in the VU-SCC-1729 cell line, which is highly invasive of basement membrane and cellular monolayers, reduced tumor cell invasiveness and migration, as well as proliferation on tissue culture plastic. Finally, inactivation of the LDB1 gene in these cells decreased growth and vascularization of xenografted human tumor cells in vivo. These data show that LMO4, LDB1, and SSBP2 and/or SSBP3 regulate metastasis, proliferation, and angiogenesis in HNSCC and provide the first evidence that SSBPs control LMO4 and LDB1 protein abundance in a cancer context.
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16 MeSH Terms
ETAA1 acts at stalled replication forks to maintain genome integrity.
Bass TE, Luzwick JW, Kavanaugh G, Carroll C, Dungrawala H, Glick GG, Feldkamp MD, Putney R, Chazin WJ, Cortez D
(2016) Nat Cell Biol 18: 1185-1195
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Antigens, Surface, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Carrier Proteins, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Line, DNA Damage, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genome, Human, Genomic Instability, Humans, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proteomics, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hypersensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse. ETAA1 contains two RPA-interaction motifs that localize ETAA1 to stalled replication forks. It also interacts with several DNA damage response proteins including the BLM/TOP3α/RMI1/RMI2 and ATR/ATRIP complexes. It binds ATR/ATRIP directly using a motif with sequence similarity to the TOPBP1 ATR-activation domain; and like TOPBP1, ETAA1 acts as a direct ATR activator. ETAA1 functions in parallel to the TOPBP1/RAD9/HUS1/RAD1 pathway to regulate ATR and maintain genome stability. Thus, vertebrate cells contain at least two ATR-activating proteins.
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15 MeSH Terms