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A Phase I Study of the Anti-Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK-1) Monoclonal Antibody PF-03446962 in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors.
Goff LW, Cohen RB, Berlin JD, de Braud FG, Lyshchik A, Noberasco C, Bertolini F, Carpentieri M, Stampino CG, Abbattista A, Wang E, Borghaei H
(2016) Clin Cancer Res 22: 2146-54
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type II, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antineoplastic Agents, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added May 7, 2016
PURPOSE - Objectives of this dose-finding study were to determine the MTD and recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of the first-in-class anti-activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK-1) monoclonal antibody PF-03446962, and assess safety and antitumor activity in patients with advanced solid tumors.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - This open-label, multicenter study was based on a 3+3 design. PF-03446962 was administered biweekly by intravenous infusion, at doses ranging from 0.5 to 15 mg/kg.
RESULTS - Forty-four patients received treatment with PF-03446962. Dose-limiting toxicities observed during dose escalation included grade 3 increased amylase, grade 3/4 increased lipase, and grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. The MTD was determined to be 10 mg/kg. The RP2D was set at 7 mg/kg for patients with advanced solid tumors, based on the observed safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity. The most-frequent treatment-related, all-grade adverse events included thrombocytopenia (20.5%), fatigue (15.9%), and nausea, increased amylase, and increased lipase (each 11.4%). Treatment-related telangiectasia was noted in 7% of patients, suggesting in vivo inhibition of the ALK-1 pathway. None of the deaths was deemed to be treatment-related. Three (6.8%) patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer achieved a partial response, and 12 (27.3%) patients had stable disease, across dose levels. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis of tumor vascularity showed reduction in tumor perfusion in 2 patients with stable disease following treatment with PF-03446962.
CONCLUSIONS - The clinical activity demonstrated in this study points to PF-03446962 as a novel approach to antiangiogenic therapy, with manageable safety profile and single-agent, antitumor activity in patients with advanced solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 22(9); 2146-54. ©2015 AACR.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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13 MeSH Terms
Heritable forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension.
Austin ED, Loyd JE
(2013) Semin Respir Crit Care Med 34: 568-80
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type II, Antigens, CD, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Caveolin 1, Endoglin, Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension, Female, Gene-Environment Interaction, Genetic Counseling, Genetic Testing, Germ-Line Mutation, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Male, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Penetrance, Potassium Channels, Tandem Pore Domain, Pregnancy, Preimplantation Diagnosis, Receptors, Cell Surface, Sex Distribution, TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the genetics of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) since its description in the 1950s. Germline mutations in the gene coding bone morphogenetic receptor type 2 (BMPR2) are detectable in the majority of cases of HPAH, and in a small proportion of cases of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Recent advancements in gene sequencing methods have facilitated the discovery of additional genes with mutations among those with and without familial PAH (CAV1, KCNK3). HPAH is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by reduced penetrance, variable expressivity, and female predominance. These characteristics suggest that genetic and nongenetic factors modify disease expression, highlighting areas of active investigation. The reduced penetrance makes genetic counseling complex, as the majority of carriers of PAH-related mutations will never be diagnosed with the disease. This issue is increasingly important, as clinical testing for BMPR2 and other mutations is now available for the evaluation of patients and their at-risk kin. The possibilities to avoid mutation transmission, such as the rapidly advancing field of preimplantation genetic testing, highlight the need for all clinicians to understand the genetic features of PAH risk.
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
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22 MeSH Terms
Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a novel and selective bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMP) inhibitor derived from the pyrazolo[1.5-a]pyrimidine scaffold of dorsomorphin: the discovery of ML347 as an ALK2 versus ALK3 selective MLPCN probe.
Engers DW, Frist AY, Lindsley CW, Hong CC, Hopkins CR
(2013) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 23: 3248-52
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Half-Life, Heterocyclic Compounds, 2-Ring, Humans, Mice, Protein Binding, Protein Isoforms, Pyrazoles, Pyrimidines, Quinolines, Rats, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added January 17, 2014
A structure-activity relationship of the 3- and 6-positions of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine scaffold of the known BMP inhibitors dorsomorphin, 1, LDN-193189, 2, and DMH1, 3, led to the identification of a potent and selective compound for ALK2 versus ALK3. The potency contributions of several 3-position substituents were evaluated with subtle structural changes leading to significant changes in potency. From these studies, a novel 5-quinoline molecule was identified and designated an MLPCN probe molecule, ML347, which shows >300-fold selectivity for ALK2 and presents the community with a selective molecular probe for further biological evaluation.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
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14 MeSH Terms
Narrative review: the enigma of pulmonary arterial hypertension: new insights from genetic studies.
Newman JH, Phillips JA, Loyd JE
(2008) Ann Intern Med 148: 278-83
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type II, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Mutation
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occurs as an idiopathic disease (formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension) and as a consequence of other illnesses. These illnesses include connective tissue diseases, portal hypertension, diet and stimulant drug use, HIV infection, and congenital heart disease. Inherited susceptibility to PAH occurs in families and is almost always due to mutations in genes of the TGF-beta family of receptors. The most common mutation leading to PAH is in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2), originally discovered to be involved in bone healing. Mutations in BMPR2 have also been found in patients with idiopathic PAH, although the true prevalence of this susceptibility has not been determined. About 20% of individuals with a BMPR2 mutation develop symptomatic pulmonary hypertension. Evidence is growing that imbalanced activation of other TGF-beta receptors coupled with reduced activity of mutated BMPR2 increases the likelihood of development of PAH. Many signaling systems have been found to participate in PAH, including K channels, serotonin, angiopoietin, and cyclooxygenases. An interaction of these signaling systems with BMPR2 is a focus of research in PAH. Approaches to altering the imbalance of activation of BMPR2 and other TGF-beta receptors may yield future therapies for PAH.
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5 MeSH Terms
Role of Smad proteins in the regulation of NF-kappaB by TGF-beta in colon cancer cells.
Grau AM, Datta PK, Zi J, Halder SK, Beauchamp RD
(2006) Cell Signal 18: 1041-50
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Nucleus, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Humans, I-kappa B Kinase, NF-kappa B, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Signal Transduction, Smad4 Protein, Smad7 Protein, Transcriptional Activation, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2013
Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) has been implicated in cancer cell survival. We explored the role of the TGF-beta pathway in the regulation of NF-kappaB in colon cancer cells. TGF-beta-1 treatment of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line FET-1, results in an early increase in IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation that precedes NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity. Activation of the TGF-beta type I receptor is required for the TGF-beta-mediated activation of NF-kappaB. No activation of NF-kappaB is observed in a Smad4 null cell line, SW480, even though TGF-beta does result in IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation in these cells. Smad4 restores the TGF-beta-1-mediated NF-kappaB activation in SW480 cells. TGF-beta-1 treatment fails to activate NF-kappaB or phosphorylate IkappaB-alpha in FET-1 cells expressing the inhibitory Smad, Smad7. Taken together, these results suggest a role for Smad4 in the transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB, and a direct effect of Smad 7 inhibiting IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation rather than through the well-established inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation with subsequent inhibition of the TGF-beta pathway.
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23 MeSH Terms
Transforming growth factor-beta induces loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle cell differentiation in epicardial cells.
Compton LA, Potash DA, Mundell NA, Barnett JV
(2006) Dev Dyn 235: 82-93
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, Calmodulin-Binding Proteins, Cell Differentiation, Chick Embryo, Epithelium, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Organ Culture Techniques, Pericardium, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Transforming Growth Factor beta, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2010
During embryogenesis, epicardial cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), invade the myocardium, and differentiate into components of the coronary vasculature, including smooth muscle cells. We tested the hypothesis that transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) stimulates EMT and smooth muscle differentiation of epicardial cells. In epicardial explants, TGFbeta1 and TGFbeta2 induce loss of epithelial morphology, cytokeratin, and membrane-associated Zonula Occludens-1 and increase the smooth muscle markers calponin and caldesmon. Inhibition of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 5 blocks these effects, whereas constitutively active (ca) ALK5 increases cell invasion by 42%. Overexpression of Smad 3 did not mimic the effects of caALK5. Inhibition of p160 rho kinase or p38 MAP kinase prevented the loss of epithelial morphology in response to TGFbeta, whereas only inhibition of p160 rho kinase blocked TGFbeta-stimulated caldesmon expression. These data demonstrate that TGFbeta stimulates loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation in epicardial cells by means of a mechanism that requires ALK5 and p160 rho kinase.
2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Activated type I TGFbeta receptor kinase enhances the survival of mammary epithelial cells and accelerates tumor progression.
Muraoka-Cook RS, Shin I, Yi JY, Easterly E, Barcellos-Hoff MH, Yingling JM, Zent R, Arteaga CL
(2006) Oncogene 25: 3408-23
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Survival, Disease Progression, Genes, Reporter, Mammary Glands, Animal, Mammary Neoplasms, Animal, Mice, Neoplasm Metastasis, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
We have examined the effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling on mammary epithelial cell survival. Transgenic mice expressing an active mutant of Alk5 in the mammary gland (MMTV-Alk5(T204D)) exhibited reduced apoptosis in terminal endbuds and during postlactational involution. Transgene-expressing mammary cells contained lower Smad2/3 and higher c-myc levels than controls, high ligand-independent phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt activities, and were insensitive to TGFbeta-mediated growth arrest. Treatment with a proteasome inhibitor increased Smad2/3 levels and ligand-independent Smad transcriptional reporter activity, as well as reduced both c-myc protein and basal cell proliferation. Treatment with an Alk5 kinase small-molecule inhibitor upregulated Smad2/3 levels, reduced PI3K activity, P-Akt, and c-myc, and inhibited cell survival. Although Alk5(T204D)-expressing mice did not develop mammary tumors, bigenic MMTV-Alk(T204D) x Neu mice developed cancers that were more metastatic than those occurring in MMTV-Neu transgenics. These data suggest that (1) TGFbeta can signal to PI3K/Akt and enhance mammary epithelial cell survival in vivo before cytological or histological evidence of transformation, and (2) TGFbeta signaling can provide epithelial cells with a 'gain-of-function' effect that synergizes with oncogene-induced transformation.
2 Communities
3 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
A specific inhibitor of TGF-beta receptor kinase, SB-431542, as a potent antitumor agent for human cancers.
Halder SK, Beauchamp RD, Datta PK
(2005) Neoplasia 7: 509-21
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Apoptosis, Benzamides, Blotting, Western, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Dioxoles, Enzyme Inhibitors, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Mice, Mink, Models, Biological, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Rats, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Time Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added June 14, 2013
Small molecule inhibitors of signaling pathways have proven to be extremely useful for the development of therapeutic strategies for human cancers. Blocking the tumor-promoting effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in advanced stage carcinogenesis provides a potentially interesting drug target for therapeutic intervention. Although very few TGF-beta receptor kinase inhibitors (TRKI) are now emerging in preclinical studies, nothing is known about how these inhibitors might regulate the tumor-suppressive or tumor-promoting effects of TGF-beta, or when these inhibitors might be useful for treatment during cancer progression. We have investigated the potential of TRKI in new therapeutic approaches in preclinical models. Here, we demonstrate that the TRKI, SB-431542, inhibits TGF-beta-induced transcription, gene expression, apoptosis, and growth suppression. We have observed that SB-431542 attenuates the tumor-promoting effects of TGF-beta, including TGF-beta-induced EMT, cell motility, migration and invasion, and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion in human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, SB-431542 induces anchorage independent growth of cells that are growth-inhibited by TGF-beta, whereas it reduces colony formation by cells that are growth-promoted by TGF-beta. However, SB-431542 has no effect on a cell line that failed to respond to TGF-beta. This represents a novel potential application of these inhibitors as therapeutic agents for human cancers with the goal of blocking tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis, when tumors are refractory to TGF-beta-induced tumor-suppressor functions but responsive to tumor-promoting effects of TGF-beta.
1 Communities
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29 MeSH Terms
Activin receptor-like kinase 2 and Smad6 regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transformation during cardiac valve formation.
Desgrosellier JS, Mundell NA, McDonnell MA, Moses HL, Barnett JV
(2005) Dev Biol 280: 201-10
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Activin Receptors, Type II, Adenoviridae, Alkaline Phosphatase, Animals, Chick Embryo, DNA-Binding Proteins, Endocardium, Epithelium, Gene Transfer Techniques, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Heart Valves, In Situ Hybridization, Mesoderm, Morphogenesis, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Signal Transduction, Smad6 Protein, Trans-Activators, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2014
Epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) occurs during both development and tumorigenesis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) ligands signal EMT in the atrioventricular (AV) cushion of the developing heart, a critical step in valve formation. TGFbeta signals through a complex of type I and type II receptors. Several type I receptors exist although activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 5 mediates the majority of TGFbeta signaling. Here, we demonstrate that ALK2 is sufficient to induce EMT in the heart. Both ALK2 and ALK5 are expressed throughout the heart with ALK2 expressed abundantly in endocardial cells of the outflow tract (OFT), ventricle, and AV cushion. Misexpression of constitutively active (ca) ALK2 in non-transforming ventricular endocardial cells induced EMT, while caALK5 did not, thus demonstrating that ALK2 activity alone is sufficient to stimulate EMT. Smad6, an inhibitor of Smad signaling downstream of ALK2, but not ALK5, inhibited EMT in AV cushion endocardial cells. These data suggest that ALK2 activation may stimulate EMT in the AV cushion and that Smad6 may act downstream of ALK2 to negatively regulate EMT.
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3 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
Type I transforming growth factor beta receptor binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.
Yi JY, Shin I, Arteaga CL
(2005) J Biol Chem 280: 10870-6
MeSH Terms: Activin Receptors, Type I, Animals, COS Cells, Cell Line, Culture Media, Serum-Free, DNA-Binding Proteins, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme Inhibitors, Genes, Dominant, Genetic Vectors, Humans, Immunoblotting, Ligands, Mice, Mutation, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphorylation, Plasmids, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Rabbits, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type I, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Reticulocytes, Smad7 Protein, Trans-Activators, Transcriptional Activation, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We have examined the interaction of transforming growth factor (TGF)beta receptors with phosphatidylinositol 3-(PI3) kinase in epithelial cells. In COS7 cells, treatment with TGFbeta increased PI3 kinase activity as measured by the ability of p85-associated immune complexes to phosphorylate inositides in vitro. Both type I and type II TGFbeta receptors (TbetaR) associated with p85, but the association of TbetaRII appeared to be constitutive. The interaction of TbetaRI with p85 was induced by treatment with TGFbeta. The receptor association with PI3 kinase was not direct as (35)S-labeled rabbit reticulocyte p85 did not couple with fusion proteins containing type I and type II receptors. A kinase-dead, dominant-negative mutant of TbetaRII blocked ligand-induced p85-TbetaRI association and PI3 kinase activity. In TbetaRI-null R1B cells, TGFbeta did not stimulate PI3 kinase activity. This stimulation was restored upon reconstitution of TbetaRI by transfection. In R1B and NMuMG epithelial cells, overexpression of a dominant active mutant form of TbetaRI markedly enhanced ligand-independent PI3 kinase activity, which was blocked by the addition of the TbetaRI kinase inhibitor LY580276, suggesting a causal link between TbetaRI function and PI3 kinase. Overexpressed Smad7 also prevented ligand-induced PI3 kinase activity. Taken together, these data suggest that 1) TGFbeta receptors can indirectly associate with p85, 2) both receptors are required for ligand-induced PI3 kinase activation, and 3) the activated TbetaRI serine-threonine kinase can potently induce PI3 kinase activity.
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29 MeSH Terms