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Predictors of vaginal bleeding during the first two trimesters of pregnancy.
Yang J, Savitz DA, Dole N, Hartmann KE, Herring AH, Olshan AF, Thorp JM
(2005) Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 19: 276-83
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Habitual, Abortion, Induced, Adult, Age Factors, Female, Humans, Obstetric Labor, Premature, Placenta Diseases, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular, Pregnancy Trimester, First, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Risk Factors, Smoking, Uterine Hemorrhage
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
This study evaluates maternal age, race, cigarette smoking, prior spontaneous abortion, prior induced abortion, and prior preterm birth in relation to vaginal bleeding during the first two trimesters of pregnancy. Information on vaginal bleeding and predictors came from the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study, which enrolled 2806 pregnant women at 24-29 weeks' gestation during 1995-2000 in central North Carolina, USA. Generalised estimating equations were applied to take into account repeated episodes of vaginal bleeding during pregnancy. Women with advanced maternal age and passive smoking exposure were more likely to experience more intense vaginal bleeding during pregnancy, as were women with prior preterm birth. More intense bleeding was also more likely to be reported among women with multiple prior spontaneous abortions or multiple prior induced abortions, but not among women with a single prior spontaneous or induced abortion. The combination of prior spontaneous and induced abortion showed a dose-response association with the occurrence of vaginal bleeding during pregnancy.
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15 MeSH Terms
Long-term physical and psychological health consequences of induced abortion: a review of the evidence.
Thorp JM, Hartmann KE, Shadigan E
(2005) Linacre Q 72: 44-69
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Abortion, Spontaneous, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Infertility, Informed Consent, Mental Disorders, Pregnancy, Pregnancy, Ectopic, Premature Birth
Added March 5, 2014
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11 MeSH Terms
Long-term physical and psychological health consequences of induced abortion: review of the evidence.
Thorp JM, Hartmann KE, Shadigian E
(2003) Obstet Gynecol Surv 58: 67-79
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Female, Health Status, Humans, Pregnancy, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
UNLABELLED - Induced abortion is a prevalent response to an unintended pregnancy. The long-term health consequences are poorly investigated and conclusions must be drawn from observational studies. Using strict inclusion criteria (study population >100 subjects, follow up >60 days) we reviewed an array of conditions in women's health. Induced abortion was not associated with changes in the prevalence of subsequent subfertility, spontaneous abortion, or ectopic pregnancy. Previous abortion was a risk factor for placenta previa. Moreover, induced abortion increased the risks for both a subsequent preterm delivery and mood disorders substantial enough to provoke attempts of self-harm. Preterm delivery and depression are important conditions in women's health and avoidance of induced abortion has potential as a strategy to reduce their prevalence. Only review articles including the single published meta-analysis exploring linkages between abortion and breast cancer were relied upon to draw conclusions. Reviewers were mixed on whether subsequent breast neoplasia can be linked to induced abortion, although the sole meta-analysis found a summary odds ratio of 1.2. Whatever the effect of induced abortion on breast cancer risk, a young woman with an unintended pregnancy clearly sacrifices the protective effect of a term delivery should she decide to abort and delay childbearing. That increase in risk can be quantified using the Gail Model. Thus, we conclude that informed consent before induced abortion should include information about the subsequent risk of preterm delivery and depression. Although it remains uncertain whether elective abortion increases subsequent breast cancer, it is clear that a decision to abort and delay pregnancy culminates in a loss of protection with the net effect being an increased risk.
TARGET AUDIENCE - Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES - After completion of this article, the reader will be able to define the terms and, to outline the epidemiologic problems in studying the long-term consequences of abortion, and to list the associated long-term consequences of abortion.
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6 MeSH Terms
Abortion history and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.
Sanderson M, Shu XO, Jin F, Dai Q, Wen W, Hua Y, Gao YT, Zheng W
(2001) Int J Cancer 92: 899-905
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Age Factors, Breast Neoplasms, China, Female, Humans, Lactation, Menopause, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Studies of the association between induced abortion and breast cancer risk have been inconsistent, perhaps due to underreporting of abortions. Induced abortion is a well-accepted family planning procedure in China, and women who have several induced abortions do not feel stigmatized. The authors used data from a population-based case-control study of breast cancer among women age 25-64 conducted between 1996 and 1998 in urban Shanghai to assess whether a history of and the number of induced abortions were related to breast cancer risk. In-person interviews were completed with 1,459 incident breast cancer cases ascertained through a population-based cancer registry, and 1,556 controls randomly selected from the general population in Shanghai (with respective response rates of 91% and 90%). After adjusting for confounding, there was no relation between ever having had an induced abortion and breast cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7-1.2). Women who had 3 or more induced abortions were not at increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.4) or postmenopausal breast cancer (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 0.8-2.3). These results suggest that a history of several induced abortions has little influence on breast cancer risk in Chinese women.
Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Thailand: physicians' attitudes on zidovudine use, pregnancy termination, and willingness to provide care.
Stringer JS, Stringer EM, Phanuphak P, Jetwana P, Reinprayoon D, Funkhouser EM, Vermund SH
(1999) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 21: 217-22
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical, Male, Mass Screening, Perinatal Care, Physician's Role, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Pregnant Women, Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors, Thailand, Zidovudine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We administered a survey to Thai physicians, using regular mail, on their attitudes and practices regarding zidovudine (ZDV) use and pregnancy termination in HIV-infected pregnant women. We surveyed their willingness to care for these patients as well. In 1997, 79.5% of 480 respondents reported that they did not routinely use perinatal ZDV prophylaxis. Predictors of failure to use ZDV found to be significant in our logistic regression model included practice outside of Bangkok (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0), belief that ZDV is not cost effective (OR = 2.5), unfamiliarity with AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) 076 results (OR = 2.5), and failure to screen for HIV routinely (OR = 4.9). Elective abortion for HIV-infected women was advocated by 45.3% of respondents. Factors associated in multivariable analysis with this preference included specialty training in obstetrics/gynecology (OR = 1.8), practice inside Bangkok (OR = 2.0), male gender (OR = 1.9), and treatment of < or =2 HIV-infected patients yearly (OR = 1.8). A significant proportion of respondents described themselves as unwilling to perform pelvic examinations (19.2%), vaginal deliveries (30.7%), or cesarean deliveries (39.5%) on women who were known to be infected with HIV. We conclude that many Thai obstetric providers are reluctant to care for HIV-infected women, do not routinely use perinatal ZDV prophylaxis, and prefer to terminate pregnancies among HIV-infected patients. Physician education concerning the value of HIV screening and antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected pregnant women is needed urgently in Thailand.
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17 MeSH Terms
Complications of midtrimester pregnancy termination: the effect of prior cesarean delivery.
Chapman SJ, Crispens M, Owen J, Savage K
(1996) Am J Obstet Gynecol 175: 889-92
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Adult, Blood Transfusion, Cesarean Section, Curettage, Female, Humans, Incidence, Odds Ratio, Postoperative Care, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies, Uterine Rupture
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Our purpose was to determine whether a prior cesarean delivery affects the incidence of complications in women having an indicated midtrimester medical pregnancy termination.
STUDY DESIGN - A retrospective review of women who underwent a midtrimester medical termination of pregnancy from January 1980 to July 1995 ascertained obstetric history, uterotonic agent(s), and the occurrence of uterine rupture, blood transfusion, or curettage. The frequencies of maternal complications were compared in women with and without a prior cesarean section.
RESULTS - Our study population included 606 women with a mean gestational age of 21.1 +/- 3.1 weeks and a mean maternal age of 26.3 +/- 7 years. Seventy-nine (13%) had undergone a prior cesarean section. There was no significant difference in the need for curettage between women with and without a prior cesarean section. However, there was an increased need for blood transfusions in women with a prior cesarean delivery (11.4% vs 5.3%, odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 5.0, p = 0.04). The incidence of uterine rupture was significantly higher among women with a prior cesarean (3.8% vs 0.2%, odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval 14.1 to 104, p = 0.008).
CONCLUSION - Our data suggest that a prior cesarean section is a risk factor for uterine rupture and blood transfusion in women having a midtrimester pregnancy termination.
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15 MeSH Terms
A population-based case-control study of endometrial cancer in Shanghai, China.
Shu XO, Brinton LA, Zheng W, Gao YT, Fan J, Fraumeni JF
(1991) Int J Cancer 49: 38-43
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Induced, Adult, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Anthropometry, Case-Control Studies, China, Contraception, Female, Humans, Menstruation, Middle Aged, Parity, Risk Factors, Smoking, Socioeconomic Factors, Uterine Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
A case-control study of 268 patients with endometrial cancer and 268 population controls was conducted during 1988-1990 in Shanghai, China, to evaluate etiologic factors in a population whose risk had not been substantially altered by the use of exogenous estrogens. In spite of this, the major risk factors resembled those found in other studies. The risk of endometrial cancer was significantly elevated among nulligravidas (OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 2.0-14.6) and decreased with number of pregnancies (p less than 0.01). Late age at menopause was associated with increased risk, while early age at menarche was unrelated. Use of oral contraceptives for more than 2 years was associated with a reduction in endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.1-1.2), while short-term use of oral contraceptives and other methods of contraception were unrelated. Obesity was a strong predictor of risk, with women in the highest quartile of weight having 2.5 times the risk of those in the lowest quartile. In contrast to many other studies, cigarette smokers were at elevated risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.0). Risk was also elevated among women reporting a history of gall-bladder disease, polycystic ovaries, menstrual symptoms, and non-estrogen hormone use.
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17 MeSH Terms