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Results: 1 to 10 of 356

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Regulation of Diabetogenic Immunity by IL-15-Activated Regulatory CD8 T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes.
Stocks BT, Wilson CS, Marshall AF, Hoopes EM, Moore DJ
(2019) J Immunol 203: 158-166
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2019
Unchecked collaboration between islet-reactive T and B lymphocytes drives type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the healthy setting, CD8 T regulatory cells (Tregs) terminate ongoing T-B interactions. We determined that specific CD8 Tregs from NOD mice lack suppressive function, representing a previously unreported regulatory cell deficit in this T1D-prone strain. NOD mice possess 11-fold fewer Ly-49 CD8 Tregs than nonautoimmune mice, a deficiency that worsens as NOD mice age toward diabetes and leaves them unable to regulate CD4 T follicular helper cells. As IL-15 is required for Ly-49 CD8 Treg development, we determined that NOD macrophages inadequately -present IL-15. Despite reduced IL-15 -presentation, NOD Ly-49 CD8 Tregs can effectively transduce IL-15-mediated survival signals when they are provided. Following stimulation with an IL-15/IL-15Ra superagonist complex, Ly-49 CD8 Tregs expanded robustly and became activated to suppress the Ag-specific Ab response. IL-15/IL-15Ra superagonist complex-activated CD8CD122 T cells also delayed diabetes transfer, indicating the presence of an underactivated CD8 T cell subset with regulatory capacity against late stage T1D. We identify a new cellular contribution to anti-islet autoimmunity and demonstrate the correction of this regulatory cell deficit. Infusion of IL-15-activated CD8 Tregs may serve as an innovative cellular therapy for the treatment of T1D.
Copyright © 2019 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
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0 MeSH Terms
Influenza Virus-Specific Human Antibody Repertoire Studies.
Crowe JE
(2019) J Immunol 202: 368-373
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The diversity of Ag-specific adaptive receptors on the surface of B cells and in the population of secreted Abs is enormous, but increasingly, we are acquiring the technical capability to interrogate Ab repertoires in great detail. These Ab technologies have been especially pointed at understanding the complex issues of immunity to infection and disease caused by influenza virus, one of the most common and vexing medical problems in man. Influenza immunity is particularly interesting as a model system because the antigenic diversity of influenza strains and proteins is high and constantly evolving. Discovery of canonical features in the subset of the influenza repertoire response that is broadly reactive for diverse influenza strains has spurred the recent optimism for creating universal influenza vaccines. Using new technologies for sequencing Ab repertoires at great depth is helping us to understand the central features of influenza immunity.
Copyright © 2019 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
0 MeSH Terms
Cutting Edge: IL-1α and Not IL-1β Drives IL-1R1-Dependent Neonatal Murine Sepsis Lethality.
Benjamin JT, Moore DJ, Bennett C, van der Meer R, Royce A, Loveland R, Wynn JL
(2018) J Immunol 201: 2873-2878
Show Abstract · Added October 12, 2018
Sepsis disproportionately affects the very old and the very young. IL-1 signaling is important in innate host defense but may also play a deleterious role in acute inflammatory conditions (including sepsis) by promulgating life-threatening inflammation. IL-1 signaling is mediated by two distinct ligands: IL-1α and IL-1β, both acting on a common receptor (IL-1R1). IL-1R1 targeting has not reduced adult human sepsis mortality despite biologic plausibility. Because the specific role of IL-1α or IL-1β in sepsis survival is unknown in any age group and the role of IL-1 signaling remains unknown in neonates, we studied the role of IL-1 signaling, including the impact of IL-1α and IL-1β, on neonatal murine sepsis survival. IL-1 signaling augments the late plasma inflammatory response to sepsis. IL-1α and not IL-1β is the critical mediator of sepsis mortality, likely because of paracrine actions within the tissue. These data do not support targeting IL-1 signaling in neonates.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
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0 MeSH Terms
How Superantigens Bind MHC.
Van Kaer L
(2018) J Immunol 201: 1817-1818
Added March 26, 2019
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
0 MeSH Terms
Anti-Insulin B Cells Are Poised for Antigen Presentation in Type 1 Diabetes.
Felton JL, Maseda D, Bonami RH, Hulbert C, Thomas JW
(2018) J Immunol 201: 861-873
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigen Presentation, Autoantibodies, Autoantigens, B-Lymphocyte Subsets, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Immune Tolerance, Inflammation, Insulin, Insulin Antibodies, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Transgenic, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell
Show Abstract · Added July 20, 2018
Early breaches in B cell tolerance are central to type 1 diabetes progression in mouse and man. Conventional BCR transgenic mouse models (VH125.Tg NOD) reveal the power of B cell specificity to drive disease as APCs. However, in conventional fixed IgM models, comprehensive assessment of B cell development is limited. To provide more accurate insight into the developmental and functional fates of anti-insulin B cells, we generated a new NOD model (V125NOD) in which anti-insulin VDJH125 is targeted to the IgH chain locus to generate a small (1-2%) population of class switch-competent insulin-binding B cells. Tracking of this rare population in a polyclonal repertoire reveals that anti-insulin B cells are preferentially skewed into marginal zone and late transitional subsets known to have increased sensitivity to proinflammatory signals. Additionally, IL-10 production, characteristic of regulatory B cell subsets, is increased. In contrast to conventional models, class switch-competent anti-insulin B cells proliferate normally in response to mitogenic stimuli but remain functionally silent for insulin autoantibody production. Diabetes development is accelerated, which demonstrates the power of anti-insulin B cells to exacerbate disease without differentiation into Ab-forming or plasma cells. Autoreactive T cell responses in V125NOD mice are not restricted to insulin autoantigens, as evidenced by increased IFN-γ production to a broad array of diabetes-associated epitopes. Together, these results independently validate the pathogenic role of anti-insulin B cells in type 1 diabetes, underscore their diverse developmental fates, and demonstrate the pathologic potential of coupling a critical β cell specificity to predominantly proinflammatory Ag-presenting B cell subsets.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Links between Immunologic Memory and Metabolic Cycling.
Cottam MA, Itani HA, Beasley AA, Hasty AH
(2018) J Immunol 200: 3681-3689
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Body Weight, Humans, Hypertension, Immunity, Innate, Immunologic Memory, Metabolic Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diet and therapeutics, often provide short-term therapy for metabolic stressors, but relapse is common. Repeated bouts of exposure to, and relief from, metabolic stimuli results in a phenomenon we call "metabolic cycling." Recent human and rodent data suggest metabolic cycling promotes an exaggerated response and ultimately worsened metabolic health. This is particularly evident with cycling of body weight and hypertension. The innate and adaptive immune systems have a profound impact on development of metabolic disease, and current data suggest that immunologic memory may partially explain this association, especially in the context of metabolic cycling. In this Brief Review, we highlight recent work in this field and discuss potential immunologic mechanisms for worsened disease prognosis in individuals who experience metabolic cycling.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
The TLR4 Agonist Monophosphoryl Lipid A Drives Broad Resistance to Infection via Dynamic Reprogramming of Macrophage Metabolism.
Fensterheim BA, Young JD, Luan L, Kleinbard RR, Stothers CL, Patil NK, McAtee-Pereira AG, Guo Y, Trenary I, Hernandez A, Fults JB, Williams DL, Sherwood ER, Bohannon JK
(2018) J Immunol 200: 3777-3789
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Candida albicans, Candidiasis, Glycolysis, Lipid A, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Signal Transduction, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a clinically used TLR4 agonist that has been found to drive nonspecific resistance to infection for up to 2 wk. However, the molecular mechanisms conferring protection are not well understood. In this study, we found that MPLA prompts resistance to infection, in part, by inducing a sustained and dynamic metabolic program in macrophages that supports improved pathogen clearance. Mice treated with MPLA had enhanced resistance to infection with and that was associated with augmented microbial clearance and organ protection. Tissue macrophages, which exhibited augmented phagocytosis and respiratory burst after MPLA treatment, were required for the beneficial effects of MPLA. Further analysis of the macrophage phenotype revealed that early TLR4-driven aerobic glycolysis was later coupled with mitochondrial biogenesis, enhanced malate shuttling, and increased mitochondrial ATP production. This metabolic program was initiated by overlapping and redundant contributions of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways as well as downstream mTOR activation. Blockade of mTOR signaling inhibited the development of the metabolic and functional macrophage phenotype and ablated MPLA-induced resistance to infection in vivo. Our findings reveal that MPLA drives macrophage metabolic reprogramming that evolves over a period of days to support a macrophage phenotype highly effective at mediating microbe clearance and that this results in nonspecific resistance to infection.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
B Cell-Intrinsic mTORC1 Promotes Germinal Center-Defining Transcription Factor Gene Expression, Somatic Hypermutation, and Memory B Cell Generation in Humoral Immunity.
Raybuck AL, Cho SH, Li J, Rogers MC, Lee K, Williams CL, Shlomchik M, Thomas JW, Chen J, Williams JV, Boothby MR
(2018) J Immunol 200: 2627-2639
MeSH Terms: Animals, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression, Germinal Center, Immunity, Humoral, Immunoglobulin G, Immunologic Memory, Lymphocyte Activation, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Plasma Cells, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-6, Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
B lymphocytes migrate among varied microenvironmental niches during diversification, selection, and conversion to memory or Ab-secreting plasma cells. Aspects of the nutrient milieu differ within these lymphoid microenvironments and can influence signaling molecules such as the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, much remains to be elucidated as to the B cell-intrinsic functions of nutrient-sensing signal transducers that modulate B cell differentiation or Ab affinity. We now show that the amino acid-sensing mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is vital for induction of Bcl6-a key transcriptional regulator of the germinal center (GC) fate-in activated B lymphocytes. Accordingly, disruption of mTORC1 after B cell development and activation led to reduced populations of Ag-specific memory B cells as well as plasma cells and GC B cells. In addition, induction of the germ line transcript that guides activation-induced deaminase in selection of the IgG1 H chain region during class switching required mTORC1. Expression of the somatic mutator activation-induced deaminase was reduced by a lack of mTORC1 in B cells, whereas point mutation frequencies in Ag-specific GC-phenotype B cells were only halved. These effects culminated in a B cell-intrinsic defect that impacted an antiviral Ab response and drastically impaired generation of high-affinity IgG1. Collectively, these data establish that mTORC1 governs critical B cell-intrinsic mechanisms essential for establishment of GC differentiation and effective Ab production.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
In Utero Exposure to Histological Chorioamnionitis Primes the Exometabolomic Profiles of Preterm CD4 T Lymphocytes.
Matta P, Sherrod SD, Marasco CC, Moore DJ, McLean JA, Weitkamp JH
(2017) J Immunol 199: 3074-3085
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Chorioamnionitis, Enterotoxins, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Pregnancy, Th1 Cells
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2017
Histological chorioamnionitis (HCA) is an intrauterine inflammatory condition that increases the risk for preterm birth, death, and disability because of persistent systemic and localized inflammation. The immunological mechanisms sustaining this response in the preterm newborn remain unclear. We sought to determine the consequences of HCA exposure on the fetal CD4 T lymphocyte exometabolome. We cultured naive CD4 T lymphocytes from HCA-positive and -negative preterm infants matched for gestational age, sex, race, prenatal steroid exposure, and delivery mode. We collected conditioned media samples before and after a 6-h in vitro activation of naive CD4 T lymphocytes with soluble staphylococcal enterotoxin B and anti-CD28. We analyzed samples by ultraperformance liquid chromatography ion mobility-mass spectrometry. We determined the impact of HCA on the CD4 T lymphocyte exometabolome and identified potential biomarker metabolites by multivariate statistical analyses. We discovered that: 1) CD4 T lymphocytes exposed to HCA exhibit divergent exometabolomic profiles in both naive and activated states; 2) ∼30% of detected metabolites differentially expressed in response to activation were unique to HCA-positive CD4 T lymphocytes; 3) metabolic pathways associated with glutathione detoxification and tryptophan degradation were altered in HCA-positive CD4 T lymphocytes; and 4) flow cytometry and cytokine analyses suggested a bias toward a T1-biased immune response in HCA-positive samples. HCA exposure primes the neonatal adaptive immune processes by inducing changes to the exometabolomic profile of fetal CD4 T lymphocytes. These exometabolomic changes may link HCA exposure to T1 polarization of the neonatal adaptive immune response.
Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
The Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide Does Not Predict the Host Response to Infection.
Fensterheim BA, Guo Y, Sherwood ER, Bohannon JK
(2017) J Immunol 198: 3264-3273
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Flow Cytometry, Ligands, Lipid A, Lipopolysaccharides, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Poly I-C, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Toll-Like Receptors
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2017
The magnitude of the LPS-elicited cytokine response is commonly used to assess immune function in critically ill patients. A suppressed response, known as endotoxin tolerance, is associated with worse outcomes, yet endotoxin tolerance-inducing TLR4 ligands are known to protect animals from infection. Thus, it remains unknown whether the magnitude of the LPS-elicited cytokine response provides an accurate assessment of antimicrobial immunity. To address this, the ability of diverse TLR ligands to modify the LPS-elicited cytokine response and resistance to infection were assessed. Priming of mice with LPS, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), or poly(I:C) significantly reduced plasma LPS-elicited proinflammatory cytokines, reflecting endotoxin tolerance, whereas CpG-ODN-primed mice showed augmented cytokine production. In contrast, LPS, MPLA, and CpG-ODN, but not poly(I:C), improved the host response to a infection. Mice primed with protective TLR ligands, including CpG-ODN, showed reduced plasma cytokines during infection. The protection imparted by TLR ligands persisted for up to 15 d yet was independent of the adaptive immune system. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, protective TLR ligands induced a persistent metabolic phenotype characterized by elevated glycolysis and oxidative metabolism as well as augmented size, granularity, phagocytosis, and respiratory burst. Sustained augmentation of glycolysis in TLR-primed cells was dependent, in part, on hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α and was essential for increased phagocytosis. In conclusion, the magnitude of LPS-elicited cytokine production is not indicative of antimicrobial immunity after exposure to TLR ligands. Additionally, protective TLR ligands induce sustained augmentation of phagocyte metabolism and antimicrobial function.
Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
0 Communities
2 Members
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15 MeSH Terms