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Results: 1 to 10 of 301

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Hepatic Gi signaling regulates whole-body glucose homeostasis.
Rossi M, Zhu L, McMillin SM, Pydi SP, Jain S, Wang L, Cui Y, Lee RJ, Cohen AH, Kaneto H, Birnbaum MJ, Ma Y, Rotman Y, Liu J, Cyphert TJ, Finkel T, McGuinness OP, Wess J
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 746-759
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
An increase in hepatic glucose production (HGP) is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Excessive signaling through hepatic Gs-linked glucagon receptors critically contributes to pathologically elevated HGP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this metabolic impairment can be counteracted by enhancing hepatic Gi signaling. Specifically, we used a chemogenetic approach to selectively activate Gi-type G proteins in mouse hepatocytes in vivo. Unexpectedly, activation of hepatic Gi signaling triggered a pronounced increase in HGP and severely impaired glucose homeostasis. Moreover, increased Gi signaling stimulated glucose release in human hepatocytes. A lack of functional Gi-type G proteins in hepatocytes reduced blood glucose levels and protected mice against the metabolic deficits caused by the consumption of a high-fat diet. Additionally, we delineated a signaling cascade that links hepatic Gi signaling to ROS production, JNK activation, and a subsequent increase in HGP. Taken together, our data support the concept that drugs able to block hepatic Gi-coupled GPCRs may prove beneficial as antidiabetic drugs.
0 Communities
1 Members
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0 MeSH Terms
Insulin exits skeletal muscle capillaries by fluid-phase transport.
Williams IM, Valenzuela FA, Kahl SD, Ramkrishna D, Mezo AR, Young JD, Wells KS, Wasserman DH
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 699-714
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Before insulin can stimulate myocytes to take up glucose, it must first move from the circulation to the interstitial space. The continuous endothelium of skeletal muscle (SkM) capillaries restricts insulin's access to myocytes. The mechanism by which insulin crosses this continuous endothelium is critical to understand insulin action and insulin resistance; however, methodological obstacles have limited understanding of endothelial insulin transport in vivo. Here, we present an intravital microscopy technique to measure the rate of insulin efflux across the endothelium of SkM capillaries. This method involves development of a fully bioactive, fluorescent insulin probe, a gastrocnemius preparation for intravital microscopy, an automated vascular segmentation algorithm, and the use of mathematical models to estimate endothelial transport parameters. We combined direct visualization of insulin efflux from SkM capillaries with modeling of insulin efflux kinetics to identify fluid-phase transport as the major mode of transendothelial insulin efflux in mice. Model-independent experiments demonstrating that insulin movement is neither saturable nor affected by insulin receptor antagonism supported this result. Our finding that insulin enters the SkM interstitium by fluid-phase transport may have implications in the pathophysiology of SkM insulin resistance as well as in the treatment of diabetes with various insulin analogs.
0 Communities
1 Members
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0 MeSH Terms
Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease.
Kropski JA, Blackwell TS
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 64-73
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Eukaryotic cells contain an elegant protein quality control system that is crucial in maintaining cellular homeostasis; however, dysfunction of this system results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Severe or prolonged ER stress is associated with the development of degenerative and fibrotic disorders in multiple organs, as evidenced by the identification of disease-causing mutations in epithelial-restricted genes that lead to protein misfolding or mistrafficking in familial fibrotic diseases. Emerging evidence implicates ER stress and UPR signaling in a variety of profibrotic mechanisms in individual cell types. In epithelial cells, ER stress can induce apoptosis, inflammatory signaling, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In other cell types, ER stress is linked to myofibroblast activation, macrophage polarization, and T cell differentiation. ER stress-targeted therapies have begun to emerge using approaches that range from global enhancement of chaperone function to selective targeting of activated ER stress sensors and other downstream mediators. As the complex regulatory mechanisms of this system are further clarified, there are opportunities to develop new disease-modifying therapeutic strategies in a wide range of chronic fibrotic diseases.
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0 MeSH Terms
p120-Catenin is an obligate haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in intestinal neoplasia.
Short SP, Kondo J, Smalley-Freed WG, Takeda H, Dohn MR, Powell AE, Carnahan RH, Washington MK, Tripathi M, Payne DM, Jenkins NA, Copeland NG, Coffey RJ, Reynolds AB
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 4462-4476
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
p120-Catenin (p120) functions as a tumor suppressor in intestinal cancer, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, using conditional p120 knockout in Apc-sensitized mouse models of intestinal cancer, we have identified p120 as an "obligatory" haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. Whereas monoallelic loss of p120 was associated with a significant increase in tumor multiplicity, loss of both alleles was never observed in tumors from these mice. Moreover, forced ablation of the second allele did not further enhance tumorigenesis, but instead induced synthetic lethality in combination with Apc loss of heterozygosity. In tumor-derived organoid cultures, elimination of both p120 alleles resulted in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis that was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK). With ROCK inhibition, however, p120-ablated organoids exhibited a branching phenotype and a substantial increase in cell proliferation. Access to data from Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis screens afforded an opportunity to directly assess the tumorigenic impact of p120 haploinsufficiency relative to other candidate drivers. Remarkably, p120 ranked third among the 919 drivers identified. Cofactors α-catenin and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) were also among the highest scoring candidates, indicating a mechanism at the level of the intact complex that may play an important role at very early stages of of intestinal tumorigenesis while simultaneously restricting outright loss via synthetic lethality.
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2 Members
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0 MeSH Terms
Hepatic β-arrestin 2 is essential for maintaining euglycemia.
Zhu L, Rossi M, Cui Y, Lee RJ, Sakamoto W, Perry NA, Urs NM, Caron MG, Gurevich VV, Godlewski G, Kunos G, Chen M, Chen W, Wess J
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 2941-2945
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, COS Cells, Cercopithecus aethiops, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucagon, Hepatocytes, Homeostasis, Insulin, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Phenotype, Receptors, Glucagon, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
An increase in hepatic glucose production (HGP) represents a key feature of type 2 diabetes. This deficiency in metabolic control of glucose production critically depends on enhanced signaling through hepatic glucagon receptors (GCGRs). Here, we have demonstrated that selective inactivation of the GPCR-associated protein β-arrestin 2 in hepatocytes of adult mice results in greatly increased hepatic GCGR signaling, leading to striking deficits in glucose homeostasis. However, hepatocyte-specific β-arrestin 2 deficiency did not affect hepatic insulin sensitivity or β-adrenergic signaling. Adult mice lacking β-arrestin 1 selectively in hepatocytes did not show any changes in glucose homeostasis. Importantly, hepatocyte-specific overexpression of β-arrestin 2 greatly reduced hepatic GCGR signaling and protected mice against the metabolic deficits caused by the consumption of a high-fat diet. Our data support the concept that strategies aimed at enhancing hepatic β-arrestin 2 activity could prove useful for suppressing HGP for therapeutic purposes.
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1 Members
0 Resources
22 MeSH Terms
Disruption of lineage specification in adult pulmonary mesenchymal progenitor cells promotes microvascular dysfunction.
Gaskill CF, Carrier EJ, Kropski JA, Bloodworth NC, Menon S, Foronjy RF, Taketo MM, Hong CC, Austin ED, West JD, Means AL, Loyd JE, Merryman WD, Hemnes AR, De Langhe S, Blackwell TS, Klemm DJ, Majka SM
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 2262-2276
MeSH Terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Sub-Family G, Member 2, Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cells, Cultured, Humans, Lung, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells, Mice, Transgenic, Microvessels, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pericytes, Protein Stability, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Vasoconstriction, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2017
Pulmonary vascular disease is characterized by remodeling and loss of microvessels and is typically attributed to pathological responses in vascular endothelium or abnormal smooth muscle cell phenotypes. We have challenged this understanding by defining an adult pulmonary mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) that regulates both microvascular function and angiogenesis. The current understanding of adult MPCs and their roles in homeostasis versus disease has been limited by a lack of genetic markers with which to lineage label multipotent mesenchyme and trace the differentiation of these MPCs into vascular lineages. Here, we have shown that lineage-labeled lung MPCs expressing the ATP-binding cassette protein ABCG2 (ABCG2+) are pericyte progenitors that participate in microvascular homeostasis as well as adaptive angiogenesis. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, either autonomously or downstream of decreased BMP receptor signaling, enhanced ABCG2+ MPC proliferation but suppressed MPC differentiation into a functional pericyte lineage. Thus, enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ABCG2+ MPCs drives a phenotype of persistent microvascular dysfunction, abnormal angiogenesis, and subsequent exacerbation of bleomycin-induced fibrosis. ABCG2+ MPCs may, therefore, account in part for the aberrant microvessel function and remodeling that are associated with chronic lung diseases.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
High salt intake reprioritizes osmolyte and energy metabolism for body fluid conservation.
Kitada K, Daub S, Zhang Y, Klein JD, Nakano D, Pedchenko T, Lantier L, LaRocque LM, Marton A, Neubert P, Schröder A, Rakova N, Jantsch J, Dikalova AE, Dikalov SI, Harrison DG, Müller DN, Nishiyama A, Rauh M, Harris RC, Luft FC, Wassermann DH, Sands JM, Titze J
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 1944-1959
MeSH Terms: Animals, Energy Metabolism, Kidney, Liver, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Sodium, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Urea, Water-Electrolyte Balance
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Natriuretic regulation of extracellular fluid volume homeostasis includes suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, pressure natriuresis, and reduced renal nerve activity, actions that concomitantly increase urinary Na+ excretion and lead to increased urine volume. The resulting natriuresis-driven diuretic water loss is assumed to control the extracellular volume. Here, we have demonstrated that urine concentration, and therefore regulation of water conservation, is an important control system for urine formation and extracellular volume homeostasis in mice and humans across various levels of salt intake. We observed that the renal concentration mechanism couples natriuresis with correspondent renal water reabsorption, limits natriuretic osmotic diuresis, and results in concurrent extracellular volume conservation and concentration of salt excreted into urine. This water-conserving mechanism of dietary salt excretion relies on urea transporter-driven urea recycling by the kidneys and on urea production by liver and skeletal muscle. The energy-intense nature of hepatic and extrahepatic urea osmolyte production for renal water conservation requires reprioritization of energy and substrate metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle, resulting in hepatic ketogenesis and glucocorticoid-driven muscle catabolism, which are prevented by increasing food intake. This natriuretic-ureotelic, water-conserving principle relies on metabolism-driven extracellular volume control and is regulated by concerted liver, muscle, and renal actions.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Transcription factor ETV1 is essential for rapid conduction in the heart.
Shekhar A, Lin X, Liu FY, Zhang J, Mo H, Bastarache L, Denny JC, Cox NJ, Delmar M, Roden DM, Fishman GI, Park DS
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 4444-4459
MeSH Terms: Animals, DNA-Binding Proteins, Heart Atria, Heart Conduction System, Heart Ventricles, Homeobox Protein Nkx-2.5, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Myocardium, Myocytes, Cardiac, NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Rapid impulse propagation in the heart is a defining property of pectinated atrial myocardium (PAM) and the ventricular conduction system (VCS) and is essential for maintaining normal cardiac rhythm and optimal cardiac output. Conduction defects in these tissues produce a disproportionate burden of arrhythmic disease and are major predictors of mortality in heart failure patients. Despite the clinical importance, little is known about the gene regulatory network that dictates the fast conduction phenotype. Here, we have used signal transduction and transcriptional profiling screens to identify a genetic pathway that converges on the NRG1-responsive transcription factor ETV1 as a critical regulator of fast conduction physiology for PAM and VCS cardiomyocytes. Etv1 was highly expressed in murine PAM and VCS cardiomyocytes, where it regulates expression of Nkx2-5, Gja5, and Scn5a, key cardiac genes required for rapid conduction. Mice deficient in Etv1 exhibited marked cardiac conduction defects coupled with developmental abnormalities of the VCS. Loss of Etv1 resulted in a complete disruption of the normal sodium current heterogeneity that exists between atrial, VCS, and ventricular myocytes. Lastly, a phenome-wide association study identified a link between ETV1 and bundle branch block and heart block in humans. Together, these results identify ETV1 as a critical factor in determining fast conduction physiology in the heart.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Vascular stiffness mechanoactivates YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis to drive pulmonary hypertension.
Bertero T, Oldham WM, Cottrill KA, Pisano S, Vanderpool RR, Yu Q, Zhao J, Tai Y, Tang Y, Zhang YY, Rehman S, Sugahara M, Qi Z, Gorcsan J, Vargas SO, Saggar R, Saggar R, Wallace WD, Ross DJ, Haley KJ, Waxman AB, Parikh VN, De Marco T, Hsue PY, Morris A, Simon MA, Norris KA, Gaggioli C, Loscalzo J, Fessel J, Chan SY
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 3313-35
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Animals, Child, Collagen, Endothelial Cells, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Glutamic Acid, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Infant, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Middle Aged, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Phosphoproteins, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Vascular Stiffness, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2016
Dysregulation of vascular stiffness and cellular metabolism occurs early in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the mechanisms by which biophysical properties of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) relate to metabolic processes important in PH remain undefined. In this work, we examined cultured pulmonary vascular cells and various types of PH-diseased lung tissue and determined that ECM stiffening resulted in mechanoactivation of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (WWTR1). YAP/TAZ activation modulated metabolic enzymes, including glutaminase (GLS1), to coordinate glutaminolysis and glycolysis. Glutaminolysis, an anaplerotic pathway, replenished aspartate for anabolic biosynthesis, which was critical for sustaining proliferation and migration within stiff ECM. In vitro, GLS1 inhibition blocked aspartate production and reprogrammed cellular proliferation pathways, while application of aspartate restored proliferation. In the monocrotaline rat model of PH, pharmacologic modulation of pulmonary vascular stiffness and YAP-dependent mechanotransduction altered glutaminolysis, pulmonary vascular proliferation, and manifestations of PH. Additionally, pharmacologic targeting of GLS1 in this model ameliorated disease progression. Notably, evaluation of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected nonhuman primates and HIV-infected subjects revealed a correlation between YAP/TAZ-GLS activation and PH. These results indicate that ECM stiffening sustains vascular cell growth and migration through YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis and anaplerosis, and thereby link mechanical stimuli to dysregulated vascular metabolism. Furthermore, this study identifies potential metabolic drug targets for therapeutic development in PH.
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23 MeSH Terms
EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.
Hardbower DM, Singh K, Asim M, Verriere TG, Olivares-Villagómez D, Barry DP, Allaman MM, Washington MK, Peek RM, Piazuelo MB, Wilson KT
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 3296-312
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Infections, Chemokines, Citrobacter rodentium, Cytokines, Disease Progression, Female, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Macrophage Activation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NF-kappa B, Phosphorylation, Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2016
EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.
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2 Members
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22 MeSH Terms