Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 1456

Publication Record

Connections

Isotopic tagging of oxidized and reduced cysteines (iTORC) for detecting and quantifying sulfenic acids, disulfides, and free thiols in cells.
Albertolle ME, Glass SM, Trefts E, Guengerich FP
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 6522-6530
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Oxidative modifications of cysteine residues are an important component in signaling pathways, enzymatic regulation, and redox homeostasis. Current direct and indirect methods detect specific modifications and a general binary population of "free" or "oxidized" cysteines, respectively. In an effort to combine both direct and indirect detection strategies, here we developed a method that we designate isotopic tagging of oxidized and reduced cysteines (iTORC). This method uses synthetic molecules for rapid isotopic coding of sulfenic acids, reduced cysteines, and disulfides in cells. Our approach utilizes isotopically distinct benzothiazine and halogenated benzothiazine probes to sequentially alkylate sulfenic acids and then free thiols and, finally, after a reduction step, cysteines oxidized to disulfides or other phosphine-reducible states. We ascertained that the iodinated benzothiazine probe has reduced cross-reactivity toward primary amines and is highly reactive with the cysteine of GSH, with a calculated rate constant of 2 × 10 m s (pH 8.0, 23 °C) ( 10-20 times faster than ethylmaleimide). We applied iTORC to a mouse hepatocyte lysate to identify known sulfenylated and disulfide-bonded proteins, including elongation factor 1-α1 and mouse serum albumin, and found that iTORC reliably detected their expected oxidation status. This method can be easily employed to study the effects of oxidants on recombinant proteins and cell and tissue extracts, and the efficiencies of the alkylating agents enable completion of all three labeling steps within 2 h. In summary, we demonstrate here that halogenated benzothiazine-based alkylating agents can be utilized to rapidly measure the cellular thiol status in cells.
© 2019 Albertolle et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
0 MeSH Terms
An alternative N-terminal fold of the intestine-specific annexin A13a induces dimerization and regulates membrane-binding.
McCulloch KM, Yamakawa I, Shifrin DA, McConnell RE, Foegeding NJ, Singh PK, Mao S, Tyska MJ, Iverson TM
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 3454-3463
MeSH Terms: Animals, Annexins, Cell Membrane, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Liposomes, Mice, Models, Molecular, Organ Specificity, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Protein Transport
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Annexin proteins function as Ca-dependent regulators of membrane trafficking and repair that may also modulate membrane curvature. Here, using high-resolution confocal imaging, we report that the intestine-specific annexin A13 (ANX A13) localizes to the tips of intestinal microvilli and determined the crystal structure of the ANX A13a isoform to 2.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the N terminus exhibits an alternative fold that converts the first two helices and the associated helix-loop-helix motif into a continuous α-helix, as stabilized by a domain-swapped dimer. We also found that the dimer is present in solution and partially occludes the membrane-binding surfaces of annexin, suggesting that dimerization may function as a means for regulating membrane binding. Accordingly, as revealed by binding and cellular localization assays, ANX A13a variants that favor a monomeric state exhibited increased membrane association relative to variants that favor the dimeric form. Together, our findings support a mechanism for how the association of the ANX A13a isoform with the membrane is regulated.
© 2019 McCulloch et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase activity promotes palmitate lipotoxicity in rat hepatocytes by enhancing anaplerosis and citric acid cycle flux.
Egnatchik RA, Leamy AK, Sacco SA, Cheah YE, Shiota M, Young JD
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 3081-3090
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aspartate Aminotransferases, Cell Death, Cell Line, Citric Acid Cycle, Extracellular Space, Glutamine, Hepatocytes, Ketoglutaric Acids, Male, Oxidative Stress, Oxygen, Palmitates, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
Hepatocyte lipotoxicity is characterized by aberrant mitochondrial metabolism, which predisposes cells to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Previously, we reported that translocation of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria of palmitate-treated hepatocytes activates anaplerotic flux from glutamine to α-ketoglutarate (αKG), which subsequently enters the citric acid cycle (CAC) for oxidation. We hypothesized that increased glutamine anaplerosis fuels elevations in CAC flux and oxidative stress following palmitate treatment. To test this hypothesis, primary rat hepatocytes or immortalized H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells were treated with lipotoxic levels of palmitate while modulating anaplerotic pathways leading to αKG. We found that culture media supplemented with glutamine, glutamate, or dimethyl-αKG increased palmitate lipotoxicity compared with media that lacked these anaplerotic substrates. Knockdown of glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase activity significantly reduced the lipotoxic effects of palmitate, whereas knockdown of glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1) had no effect on palmitate lipotoxicity. C flux analysis of H4IIEC3 cells co-treated with palmitate and the pan-transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid confirmed that reductions in lipotoxic markers were associated with decreases in anaplerosis, CAC flux, and oxygen consumption. Taken together, these results demonstrate that lipotoxic palmitate treatments enhance anaplerosis in cultured rat hepatocytes, causing a shift to aberrant transaminase metabolism that fuels CAC dysregulation and oxidative stress.
© 2019 Egnatchik et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Unicellular ancestry and mechanisms of diversification of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein.
Darris C, Revert F, Revert-Ros F, Gozalbo-Rovira R, Feigley A, Fidler A, Lopez-Pascual E, Saus J, Hudson BG
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 759-769
MeSH Terms: Basement Membrane, Evolution, Molecular, Humans, Isoenzymes, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added November 19, 2018
The emergence of the basement membrane (BM), a specialized form of extracellular matrix, was essential in the unicellular transition to multicellularity. However, the mechanism is unknown. Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a BM protein, was uniquely poised to play diverse roles in this transition owing to its multiple isoforms (GPBP-1, -2, and -3) with varied intracellular and extracellular functions (ceramide trafficker and protein kinase). We sought to determine the evolutionary origin of GPBP isoforms. Our findings reveal the presence of GPBP in unicellular protists, with GPBP-2 as the most ancient isoform. In vertebrates, GPBP-1 assumed extracellular function that is further enhanced by membrane-bound GPBP-3 in mammalians, whereas GPBP-2 retained intracellular function. Moreover, GPBP-2 possesses a dual intracellular/extracellular function in cnidarians, an early nonbilaterian group. We conclude that GPBP functioning both inside and outside the cell was of fundamental importance for the evolutionary transition to animal multicellularity and tissue evolution.
© 2019 Darris et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
Structure-function analyses of the ion channel TRPC3 reveal that its cytoplasmic domain allosterically modulates channel gating.
Sierra-Valdez F, Azumaya CM, Romero LO, Nakagawa T, Cordero-Morales JF
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 16102-16114
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Ankyrin Repeat, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Ion Channel Gating, Mutation, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Domains, TRPC Cation Channels
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The transient receptor potential ion channels support Ca permeation in many organs, including the heart, brain, and kidney. Genetic mutations in transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily C member 3 (TRPC3) are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, memory loss, and hypertension. To better understand the conformational changes that regulate TRPC3 function, we solved the cryo-EM structures for the full-length human TRPC3 and its cytoplasmic domain (CPD) in the apo state at 5.8- and 4.0-Å resolution, respectively. These structures revealed that the TRPC3 transmembrane domain resembles those of other TRP channels and that the CPD is a stable module involved in channel assembly and gating. We observed the presence of a C-terminal domain swap at the center of the CPD where horizontal helices (HHs) transition into a coiled-coil bundle. Comparison of TRPC3 structures revealed that the HHs can reside in two distinct positions. Electrophysiological analyses disclosed that shortening the length of the C-terminal loop connecting the HH with the TRP helices increases TRPC3 activity and that elongating the length of the loop has the opposite effect. Our findings indicate that the C-terminal loop affects channel gating by altering the allosteric coupling between the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains. We propose that molecules that target the HH may represent a promising strategy for controlling TRPC3-associated neurological disorders and hypertension.
© 2018 Sierra-Valdez et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Glycine -methyltransferase deletion in mice diverts carbon flux from gluconeogenesis to pathways that utilize excess methionine cycle intermediates.
Hughey CC, Trefts E, Bracy DP, James FD, Donahue EP, Wasserman DH
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 11944-11954
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carbon, Citric Acid Cycle, Energy Metabolism, Fatty Liver, Gene Deletion, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Liver, Male, Metabolic Flux Analysis, Methionine, Mice, Mice, Knockout, S-Adenosylmethionine
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Glycine -methyltransferase (GNMT) is the most abundant liver methyltransferase regulating the availability of the biological methyl donor, -adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, GNMT has been identified to be down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite its role in regulating SAM levels and association of its down-regulation with liver tumorigenesis, the impact of reduced GNMT on metabolic reprogramming before the manifestation of HCC has not been investigated in detail. Herein, we used H/C metabolic flux analysis in conscious, unrestrained mice to test the hypothesis that the absence of GNMT causes metabolic reprogramming. GNMT-null (KO) mice displayed a reduction in blood glucose that was associated with a decline in both hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The reduced gluconeogenesis was due to a decrease in liver gluconeogenic precursors, citric acid cycle fluxes, and anaplerosis and cataplerosis. A concurrent elevation in both hepatic SAM and metabolites of SAM utilization pathways was observed in the KO mice. Specifically, the increase in metabolites of SAM utilization pathways indicated that hepatic polyamine synthesis and catabolism, transsulfuration, and lipogenesis pathways were increased in the KO mice. Of note, these pathways utilize substrates that could otherwise be used for gluconeogenesis. Also, this metabolic reprogramming occurs before the well-documented appearance of HCC in GNMT-null mice. Together, these results indicate that GNMT deletion promotes a metabolic shift whereby nutrients are channeled away from glucose formation toward pathways that utilize the elevated SAM.
© 2018 Hughey et al.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Cryo-EM structure of the cytoplasmic domain of murine transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily C member 6 (TRPC6).
Azumaya CM, Sierra-Valdez F, Cordero-Morales JF, Nakagawa T
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 10381-10391
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Cytoplasm, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Mutation, Protein Domains, TRPC6 Cation Channel
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The kidney maintains the internal milieu by regulating the retention and excretion of proteins, ions, and small molecules. The glomerular podocyte forms the slit diaphragm of the ultrafiltration filter, whose damage leads to progressive kidney failure and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) ion channel is expressed in the podocyte, and mutations in its cytoplasmic domain cause FSGS in humans. evaluation of disease-causing mutations in TRPC6 has revealed that these genetic alterations result in abnormal ion channel gating. However, the mechanism whereby the cytoplasmic domain modulates TRPC6 function is largely unknown. Here, we report a cryo-EM structure of the cytoplasmic domain of murine TRPC6 at 3.8 Å resolution. The cytoplasmic fold of TRPC6 is characterized by an inverted dome-like chamber pierced by four radial horizontal helices that converge into a vertical coiled-coil at the central axis. Unlike other TRP channels, TRPC6 displays a unique domain swap that occurs at the junction of the horizontal helices and coiled-coil. Multiple FSGS mutations converge at the buried interface between the vertical coiled-coil and the ankyrin repeats, which form the dome, suggesting these regions are critical for allosteric gating modulation. This functionally critical interface is a potential target for drug design. Importantly, dysfunction in other family members leads to learning deficits (TRPC1/4/5) and ataxia (TRPC3). Our data provide a structural framework for the mechanistic investigation of the TRPC family.
© 2018 Azumaya et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Modification by isolevuglandins, highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes, deleteriously alters high-density lipoprotein structure and function.
May-Zhang LS, Yermalitsky V, Huang J, Pleasent T, Borja MS, Oda MN, Jerome WG, Yancey PG, Linton MF, Davies SS
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 9176-9187
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Animals, Apolipoprotein A-I, Apolipoprotein A-II, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, Ketones, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Lipoproteins, HDL, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phosphatidylethanolamines
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2018
Cardiovascular disease risk depends on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, not HDL-cholesterol. Isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) are lipid dicarbonyls that react with lysine residues of proteins and phosphatidylethanolamine. IsoLG adducts are elevated in atherosclerosis. The consequences of IsoLG modification of HDL have not been studied. We hypothesized that IsoLG modification of apoA-I deleteriously alters HDL function. We determined the effect of IsoLG on HDL structure-function and whether pentylpyridoxamine (PPM), a dicarbonyl scavenger, can preserve HDL function. IsoLG adducts in HDL derived from patients with familial hypercholesterolemia ( = 10, 233.4 ± 158.3 ng/mg) were found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls ( = 7, 90.1 ± 33.4 pg/mg protein). Further, HDL exposed to myeloperoxidase had elevated IsoLG-lysine adducts (5.7 ng/mg protein) compared with unexposed HDL (0.5 ng/mg protein). Preincubation with PPM reduced IsoLG-lysine adducts by 67%, whereas its inactive analogue pentylpyridoxine did not. The addition of IsoLG produced apoA-I and apoA-II cross-links beginning at 0.3 molar eq of IsoLG/mol of apoA-I (0.3 eq), whereas succinylaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal required 10 and 30 eq. IsoLG increased HDL size, generating a subpopulation of 16-23 nm. 1 eq of IsoLG decreased HDL-mediated [H]cholesterol efflux from macrophages via ABCA1, which corresponded to a decrease in HDL-apoA-I exchange from 47.4% to only 24.8%. This suggests that IsoLG inhibits apoA-I from disassociating from HDL to interact with ABCA1. The addition of 0.3 eq of IsoLG ablated HDL's ability to inhibit LPS-stimulated cytokine expression by macrophages and increased IL-1β expression by 3.5-fold. The structural-functional effects were partially rescued with PPM scavenging.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
The unassembled flavoprotein subunits of human and bacterial complex II have impaired catalytic activity and generate only minor amounts of ROS.
Maklashina E, Rajagukguk S, Iverson TM, Cecchini G
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 7754-7765
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Proteins, Catalysis, Crystallography, X-Ray, Electron Transport Complex II, Escherichia coli, Flavoproteins, Humans, Models, Molecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Conformation, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Complex II (SdhABCD) is a membrane-bound component of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport chains, as well as of the TCA cycle. In this capacity, it catalyzes the reversible oxidation of succinate. SdhABCD contains the SDHA protein harboring a covalently bound FAD redox center and the iron-sulfur protein SDHB, containing three distinct iron-sulfur centers. When assembly of this complex is compromised, the flavoprotein SDHA may accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix or bacterial cytoplasm. Whether the unassembled SDHA has any catalytic activity, for example in succinate oxidation, fumarate reduction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, or other off-pathway reactions, is not known. Therefore, here we investigated whether unassembled SdhA flavoprotein, its homolog fumarate reductase (FrdA), and the human SDHA protein have succinate oxidase or fumarate reductase activity and can produce ROS. Using recombinant expression in , we found that the free flavoproteins from these divergent biological sources have inherently low catalytic activity and generate little ROS. These results suggest that the iron-sulfur protein SDHB in complex II is necessary for robust catalytic activity. Our findings are consistent with those reported for single-subunit flavoprotein homologs that are not associated with iron-sulfur or heme partner proteins.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Introduction to the Thematic Minireview Series: Brain glycogen metabolism.
Carlson GM, Dienel GA, Colbran RJ
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 7087-7088
MeSH Terms: Brain, Glycogen, Glycogenolysis, Glycolysis, Humans, Review Literature as Topic, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The synthesis of glycogen allows for efficient intracellular storage of glucose molecules in a soluble form that can be rapidly released to enter glycolysis in response to energy demand. Intensive studies of glucose and glycogen metabolism, predominantly in skeletal muscle and liver, have produced innumerable insights into the mechanisms of hormone action, resulting in the award of several Nobel Prizes over the last one hundred years. Glycogen is actually present in all cells and tissues, albeit at much lower levels than found in muscle or liver. However, metabolic and physiological roles of glycogen in other tissues are poorly understood. This series of Minireviews summarizes what is known about the enzymes involved in brain glycogen metabolism and studies that have linked glycogen metabolism to multiple brain functions involving metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons. Recent studies unexpectedly linking some forms of epilepsy to mutations in two poorly understood proteins involved in glycogen metabolism are also reviewed.
© 2018 Carlson et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms