Mark Lipsey
Last active: 4/6/2017

The effects of CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care on gestational age, birth weight, and fetal demise.

Tanner-Smith EE, Steinka-Fry KT, Lipsey MW
Matern Child Health J. 2014 18 (4): 801-9

PMID: 23793483 · DOI:10.1007/s10995-013-1304-z

We examined the effects of CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care versus individually delivered prenatal care on gestational age, birth weight, and fetal demise. We conducted a retrospective chart review and used propensity score matching to form a sample of 6,155 women receiving prenatal care delivered in a group or individual format at five sites in Tennessee. Compared to the matched group of women receiving prenatal care in an individual format, women in CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care had longer weeks of gestation (b = .35, 95 % CI [.29, .41]), higher birth weight in grams (b = 28.6, 95 % CI [4.8, 52.3]), lower odds of very low birth weight (OR = .21, 95 % CI [.06, .70]), and lower odds of fetal demise (OR = .12, 95 % CI [.02, .92]). Results indicated no evidence of differences in the odds of preterm birth or low birth weight for participants in group versus individual prenatal care. CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care had statistically and clinically significant beneficial effects on very low birth weight and fetal demise outcomes relative to traditional individually delivered prenatal care. Group prenatal care had statistically significant beneficial effects on gestational age and birth weight, although the effects were relatively small in clinical magnitude.

MeSH Terms (15)

Adult Birth Weight Case-Control Studies Cohort Studies Confidence Intervals Female Fetal Death Gestational Age Humans Patient-Centered Care Pregnancy Prenatal Care Quality of Health Care Standard of Care Young Adult

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