Development of a Theory-based, Sociocultural Instrument to Assess Black Maternal Intentions to Vaccinate Their Daughters Aged 9 to 12 Against HPV.

Cunningham-Erves J, Talbott LL, O'Neal MR, Ivankova NV, Wallston KA
J Cancer Educ. 2016 31 (3): 514-21

PMID: 26081311 · DOI:10.1007/s13187-015-0867-3

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could assist in reducing the cervical cancer disparity existing between Black and White women. Understanding factors influencing Black maternal intentions to vaccinate their daughter is essential in improving vaccination uptake. However, existing instruments do not comprehensively assess factors (e.g., culture) influencing maternal intentions. This paper describes the development of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Survey for Black Mothers with Girls Aged 9 to 12 (HPVS-BM), the first instrument to measure knowledge, attitudes, subjective norms, and cultural beliefs relating to Black maternal intentions to vaccinate their daughters aged 9 to 12 years against HPV. The items and scales were refined using content review by experts, as well as cognitive interviews and pilot testing with target audience participants. The final version of the HPVS-BM was administered to 242 Black mothers with adolescent daughters. Internal reliability was determined using Cronbach's alpha. An a priori hypothetical model was developed to determine convergent and discriminant validity. All scales of the HPVS-BM had an acceptable internal reliability of 0.70 or higher. The intention scale of HPVS-BM was significantly correlated (p < .05) with perceived benefits, perceived barriers, and subjective norms, supporting strong convergent validity. Moderate discriminant construct validity was also demonstrated. Exhibiting good psychometrics, this instrument could be used by healthcare researchers and professionals to develop programs to increase HPV vaccination among Black adolescent females aimed at reducing the racial disparities in cervical cancer. Further psychometric testing of this survey tool for understanding factors influencing maternal intentions is warranted.

MeSH Terms (16)

Adolescent Adult African Americans Child Female Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice Humans Mother-Child Relations Mothers Papillomaviridae Papillomavirus Infections Papillomavirus Vaccines Perception Surveys and Questionnaires Vaccination Young Adult

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