Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Correlate with Serum Cytokines and Clinical Disease Activity in Crohn's Disease.

Scoville EA, Allaman MM, Adams DW, Motley AK, Peyton SC, Ferguson SL, Horst SN, Williams CS, Beaulieu DB, Schwartz DA, Wilson KT, Coburn LA
Sci Rep. 2019 9 (1): 2882

PMID: 30814550 · PMCID: PMC6393448 · DOI:10.1038/s41598-019-39232-z

Crohn's disease (CD) has been associated with an increased consumption of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), while greater intake of n-3 PUFA has been associated with a reduced risk. We sought to investigate serum fatty acid composition in CD, and associations of fatty acids with disease activity, cytokines, and adipokines. Serum was prospectively collected from 116 CD subjects and 27 non-IBD controls. Clinical disease activity was assessed by the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI). Serum fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. Serum cytokines and adipokines were measured by Luminex assay. Dietary histories were obtained from a subset of patients. Nine serum cytokines and adipokines were increased in CD versus controls. CD subjects had increased percentage serum monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and oleic acid, but decreased arachidonic acid (AA) versus controls. The % total n-3 fatty acids and % EPA directly correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and HBI, whereas the % total n-6 fatty acids were inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and HBI. CD subjects had increased caloric intake versus controls, but no alterations in total fat or PUFA intake. We found differences in serum fatty acids, most notably PUFA, in CD that correlated both with clinical disease activity and inflammatory cytokines. Our findings indicate that altered fatty acid metabolism or utilization is present in CD and is related to disease activity.

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