John Jeffrey Carr
Professor of Radiology, Biomedical Informatics and Cardiovascular Medicine
Last active: 9/11/2017

Adult height and prevalence of coronary artery calcium: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

Miedema MD, Petrone AB, Arnett DK, Dodson JA, Carr JJ, Pankow JS, Hunt SC, Province MA, Kraja A, Gaziano JM, Djousse L
Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 7 (1): 52-7

PMID: 24336983 · PMCID: PMC3970195 · DOI:10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.113.000681

BACKGROUND - Adult height has been hypothesized to be inversely associated with coronary heart disease; however, studies have produced conflicting results. We sought to examine the relationship between adult height and the prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC), a direct measure of subclinical atherosclerosis and surrogate marker of coronary heart disease.

METHODS AND RESULTS - We evaluated the relationship between adult height and CAC in 2703 participants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study who underwent cardiac computed tomography. We used generalized estimating equations to calculate the prevalence odds ratios for the presence of CAC (CAC>0) across sex-specific quartiles of height. The mean age of the sample was 54.8 years, and 60.2% of participants were female. There was an inverse association between adult height and CAC. After adjusting for age, race, field center, waist circumference, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medications, diabetes mellitus, diabetic medications, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipid-lowering medications, and income, individuals in the tallest quartile had 30% lower odds of having prevalent CAC. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the presence of CAC across consecutive sex-specific quartiles of height were 1.0 (reference), 1.15 (0.86-1.53), 0.95 (0.73-1.22), and 0.70 (0.53-0.93), and P for trend<0.01. There was no evidence of effect modification for the relationship between adult height and CAC by age or socioeconomic status.

CONCLUSIONS - The results of our study suggest an inverse, independent association between adult height and CAC.

MeSH Terms (20)

Adult Aged Age Factors Body Height Chi-Square Distribution Coronary Angiography Coronary Artery Disease Female Humans Linear Models Male Middle Aged Multivariate Analysis National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.) Odds Ratio Prevalence Risk Factors Tomography, X-Ray Computed United States Vascular Calcification

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