Comorbidities and breast cancer survival: a report from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study.

Nechuta S, Lu W, Zheng Y, Cai H, Bao PP, Gu K, Zheng W, Shu XO
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2013 139 (1): 227-35

PMID: 23605082 · PMCID: PMC3712758 · DOI:10.1007/s10549-013-2521-2

We investigated the association of major comorbidities with breast cancer outcomes using the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study of Chinese women diagnosed with breast cancer. Analyses included 4,664 women diagnosed with stage I-III incident breast cancer aged 20-75 years (median age = 51) during 2002-2006. Women were interviewed at 3-11 months post-diagnosis (median = 6.4) and followed up by in-person interviews and linkage with the vital statistics registry. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and (95 % confidence intervals (CIs)) for the associations of comorbidities with breast cancer outcomes were estimated using Cox regression models. After a median follow-up of 5.3 years (range: 0.64-8.9), 647 women died (516 from breast cancer) and 632 recurrence/metastases were documented. The main comorbidities reported included: hypertension (22.4 %), chronic gastritis (14.3 %), diabetes mellitus (6.2 %), chronic bronchitis/asthma (5.8 %), coronary heart disease (5.0 %), and stroke (2.2 %). Diabetes was associated with increased risk of total mortality (adjusted HR: 1.40 (1.06-1.85)) and non-breast cancer mortality (adjusted HR: 2.64 (1.63-4.27)), but not breast cancer-specific mortality (adjusted HR: 0.98 (0.68-1.41)), adjusting for socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, selected lifestyle factors, and other comorbidities. Women with a history of stroke had a non-significant increased risk of total mortality (adjusted HR: 1.42 (0.91-2.22)) and a significant increased risk of non-breast cancer mortality (adjusted HR: 2.52 (1.33-4.78)), but not breast cancer-specific mortality (adjusted HR: 0.78 (0.38-1.62)). Overall, none of the comorbidities investigated were significantly associated with recurrence. In this large prospective cohort of breast cancer survivors, diabetes was significantly associated with increased risk of total and non-breast cancer mortality, and history of stroke was associated with increased risk of non-breast cancer mortality.

MeSH Terms (11)

Adult Aged Breast Neoplasms China Cohort Studies Comorbidity Female Humans Middle Aged Proportional Hazards Models Young Adult

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