Pseudogene-derived small interfering RNAs regulate gene expression in mouse oocytes.

Tam OH, Aravin AA, Stein P, Girard A, Murchison EP, Cheloufi S, Hodges E, Anger M, Sachidanandam R, Schultz RM, Hannon GJ
Nature. 2008 453 (7194): 534-8

PMID: 18404147 · PMCID: PMC2981145 · DOI:10.1038/nature06904

Pseudogenes populate the mammalian genome as remnants of artefactual incorporation of coding messenger RNAs into transposon pathways. Here we show that a subset of pseudogenes generates endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in mouse oocytes. These endo-siRNAs are often processed from double-stranded RNAs formed by hybridization of spliced transcripts from protein-coding genes to antisense transcripts from homologous pseudogenes. An inverted repeat pseudogene can also generate abundant small RNAs directly. A second class of endo-siRNAs may enforce repression of mobile genetic elements, acting together with Piwi-interacting RNAs. Loss of Dicer, a protein integral to small RNA production, increases expression of endo-siRNA targets, demonstrating their regulatory activity. Our findings indicate a function for pseudogenes in regulating gene expression by means of the RNA interference pathway and may, in part, explain the evolutionary pressure to conserve argonaute-mediated catalysis in mammals.

MeSH Terms (13)

Animals Computational Biology DNA Transposable Elements Female Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental Gene Library Mice Oocytes Pseudogenes Ribonuclease III RNA, Messenger RNA, Small Interfering RNA Interference

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