The mission of the Vanderbilt Transgenic Mouse/Embryonic Stem Cell Shared Resource (TMESCSR) is to provide services that facilitate the generation, storage and regeneration of genetically altered mice. We provide a wide array of services that are essential to support these goals. 

The following procedures are provided on a fee-for-service basis:

  • Crispr/Cas9 mouse technologies
  • Gene targeting in mouse ES cells
  • Pronuclear microinjection of DNAs
  • Recombinase Mediated Cassette Exchange
  • Embryo and sperm cryopreservation
  • In vitro fertilization and rederivation
  • BAC recombineering
  • Southern blot hybridization

The TMESCSR is staffed by experienced stem cell scientists and highly competent staff, and our track record in performing these services is extensive.  In addition, we are also happy to work with you to develop and/or implement new methods and techniques.  

  • Location: 9410 MRB-IV
  • Phone: 615-936-3454   

CRISPR mutagenesis: We have now successfully induced knockout mutations in 4 of 5 loci tested to date. The goal of these projects was to create simple insertion/deletion mutations via the NHEJ repair pathway. 

CRISPR editing by homology-directed  gene repair:   We have now had preliminary success in 2 separate codon editing experiments. In each case, 2 or more mice were born carrying a correctly recombined fragment designed to alter a single codon within a targeted gene of interest.

CRISPR/Cas9 Services page + data example


The TMESCSR has now partnered with Sigma-Aldrich to provide discounted core pricing on CRISPR reagents to Vanderbilt customers.

These items include Cas9 mRNA, custom guide RNAs, and long DNA oligos for HDR. Vanderbilt community members may obtain the Sigma-Aldrich CRISPR core price list from this internal web page. 

For more information about Sigma-Aldrich CRISPR reagents, check out the Sigma-Aldrich CRISPR web page or contact Christopher Lemke at Sigma-Aldrich (christopher.lemke@sial.com).   

 

Flexner Discovery Lecture Series: 

Jennifer Doudna, Ph.D.

Crispr Biology:  From Foundational to Translational Science

http://mediasite.vanderbilt.edu/Mediasite/Play/b8701c579ec6438abcc0188275efa16a1d

 

 

Publications/Citations

Featured publications

  1. Using a new Lrig1 reporter mouse to assess differences between two Lrig1 antibodies in the intestine. Poulin EJ, Powell AE, Wang Y, Li Y, Franklin JL, Coffey RJ (2014) Stem Cell Res 13(3PA): 422-430
    › Citation · 25460603 (PubMed)
  2. Dominant and context-specific control of endodermal organ allocation by Ptf1a. Willet SG, Hale MA, Grapin-Botton A, Magnuson MA, MacDonald RJ, Wright CV (2014) Development 141(22): 4385-94
    › Citation · 25371369 (PubMed)
  3. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants. Mergy MA, Gowrishankar R, Gresch PJ, Gantz SC, Williams J, Davis GL, Wheeler CA, Stanwood GD, Hahn MK, Blakely RD (2014) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
    › Citation · 25331903 (PubMed)
  4. Attenuated transforming growth factor beta signaling promotes metastasis in a model of HER2 mammary carcinogenesis. Novitskiy SV, Forrester E, Pickup MW, Gorska AE, Chytil A, Aakre M, Polosukhina D, Owens P, Yusupova DR, Zhao Z, Ye F, Shyr Y, Moses HL (2014) Breast Cancer Res 16(5): 425
    › Citation · 25280532 (PubMed)
  5. Deletion of KCC3 in parvalbumin neurons leads to locomotor deficit in a conditional mouse model of peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Ding J, Delpire E (2014) Behav Brain Res : 128-36
    › Citation · 25116249 (PubMed) · PMC4179972 (PubMed Central)
  6. Activated FoxM1 attenuates streptozotocin-mediated β-cell death. Golson ML, Maulis MF, Dunn JC, Poffenberger G, Schug J, Kaestner KH, Gannon MA (2014) Mol Endocrinol 28(9): 1435-47
    › Citation · 25073103 (PubMed) · PMC4154244 (PubMed Central)
  7. Insm1 promotes endocrine cell differentiation by modulating the expression of a network of genes that includes Neurog3 and Ripply3. Osipovich AB, Long Q, Manduchi E, Gangula R, Hipkens SB, Schneider J, Okubo T, Stoeckert CJ, Takada S, Magnuson MA (2014) Development 141(15): 2939-49
    › Citation · 25053427 (PubMed)
  8. Integrin-mediated type II TGF-β receptor tyrosine dephosphorylation controls SMAD-dependent profibrotic signaling. Chen X, Wang H, Liao HJ, Hu W, Gewin L, Mernaugh G, Zhang S, Zhang ZY, Vega-Montoto L, Vanacore RM, Fässler R, Zent R, Pozzi A (2014) J Clin Invest 124(8): 3295-310
    › Citation · 24983314 (PubMed) · PMC4109532 (PubMed Central)
  9. ETO family protein Mtg16 regulates the balance of dendritic cell subsets by repressing Id2. Ghosh HS, Ceribelli M, Matos I, Lazarovici A, Bussemaker HJ, Lasorella A, Hiebert SW, Liu K, Staudt LM, Reizis B (2014) J Exp Med 211(8): 1623-35
    › Citation · 24980046 (PubMed) · PMC4113936 (PubMed Central)
  10. Inducible Loss of One Apc Allele in Lrig1-Expressing Progenitor Cells Results in Multiple Distal Colonic Tumors with Features of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Powell AE, Vlacich G, Zhao ZY, McKinley ET, Washington MK, Manning HC, Coffey RJ (2014) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol
    › Citation · 24833705 (PubMed)

Community Leaders

Keywords

Mouse Knock in ES cells rederivation cryopreservation BAC RMCE Transgenic Knockout iPSC cells CRISPR

Contact Information

9410 MRB IV
2213 Garland Avenue
Nashville, TN 37232
United States

No contact person provided